Katie Knoeringer. Stranger (at a bar). #1040
Katie Knoeringer
Houses are like people and vice versa. Both are containers for thoughts. There are things we can't know about someone unless they let us inside. A significant amount of my work is about houses and I also draw people. This stranger seemed reminiscent of the figure in Harry Sefarbi's work Interior: Jim. I observed this person in a public place while he was enthralled with private thoughts and interactions on his phone.

Katie grew up in New Jersey and went to school at Kutztown University. She received her MFA from Louisiana State University. She loves running and biking and being outside making drawings. She teaches at Drexel University and lives in East Kensington Philadelphia with her husband and their two cats Raisin and Peach. She will be attending Jentel as an artist in residence this October.

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Harry Sefarbi. Interior: Jim. BF2540


David Ruffner, Mabel Luu. The Landing. #1164
David Ruffner, Mabel Luu
This piece was inspired by an artwork at the Barnes: Woman with Pigeons by Gustave Courbet. We were inspired by the interaction and composition between the woman and the pigeons, in turn, our painting fuses the two subjects together into a new visual experience. Using the principles of dark, light, contrast, and negative space, the relationship between the woman and pigeon becomes the main focal point of thought.

Dave and Mabel are a creative duo residing in Philadelphia. Dave is a painter who explores the visual relationships between dark, light, and negative space. Mabel is a photographer who explores capturing genuine moments, and often provides reference photos for Dave's paintings.

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Gustave Courbet. Woman with Pigeons. BF824


Ebony Bennett. Girl With Jump Rope. #1159
Ebony Bennett
While visiting the Barnes Foundation several times, Renoir's "Girl with Jump Rope" caught my attention on every occasion. It reminded me of playing outside in my pretty dress and shoes as a little girl.Then having my mother tell me not to ruin my clothes and shoes. With my submission, I decided to recreate the girl's boots from Renoir's painting.



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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Girl with a Jump Rope (Portrait of Delphine Legrand). BF137


Rebecca Jacob. Malus. #1169
Rebecca Jacob
As an artist, I work hard to develop paintings that speak both to me and to others about the beauty that exists in abstract color. I do not merely want to capture the image with my brushes; rather, with careful, colorful strokes, give life with color.

Rebecca graduated from Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia. In addition to Moore, Rebecca studied at the School of the Visual Arts, NYC, The Art Students League of New York, the Cleveland Art Museum and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Rebecca worked as a designer and storyboard illustrator in NYC, prior to concentrating on painting and family full time.

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Paul Cézanne. Still Life with Skull (Nature morte au crâne). BF329


Pia De Girolamo. Cliff, Trees and Lake. #1182
Pia De Girolamo
My paintings derive from the landscape, which I abstract to convey the essence of place so I responded to the formal qualities as well as the mystery of Milton Avery's The Nursemaid and translated the figures into a landscape.

Growing up, I studied painting with a local artist. I continued studying fine art at Barnard College and received a BA in Art/Architectural History while also following a pre-medicine curriculum. I became an Infectious Diseases physician and started a private practice. Later, I changed course, resumed my art education at PAFA and with individual artists and now work as a professional artist. My work is in corporate and individual collections in the US and Italy, including those of PNC Bank headquarters and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. I am a member of 3rd Street Gallery and Cerulean Arts Collective.

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Milton Avery. The Nursemaid. BF961


Marilyn MacGregor, MacGregor-Art. Fresh Pastry (Le Patissier). #1044
Marilyn MacGregor, MacGregor-Art
Le Patissier, with its fresh colorful paint surface and sly sense of whimsy, has a story that puts it at the heart of Dr. Barnes’ active involvement in forming his great collection. My piece, initiated with hand-drawing, a medium well represented in the collection, responds not only to the color and whimsy of Soutine’s original, but to many of the values that Dr. Barnes held dear. In my piece The Pastry Chef pushes forward out of the frame, a reference to Dr. Barnes’ refusal to be bound by convention, and the digital color, a contemporary medium I use in a free-hand, careful but spontaneous way, salutes his embrace of new ideas, new mediums, and fresh new ways of seeing the world.

Marilyn MacGregor is a fine artist, illustrator, and graphic designer with an extensive record of exhibitions and a popular series of colorful prints of Philadelphia entitled Famous Sites and Favorite Places. She uses her many sketchbooks from life and travel in the US and in Europe to create much of her illustration and graphic design work, including her International Series of fine art prints, and shows her scenes of Paris in a Paris gallery. She is also an art historian who has taught at secondary and university levels, and whose love of art of all periods and types infuses everything she does.

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Chaim Soutine. The Pastry Chef (Baker Boy) (Le Pâtissier). BF442


Linda Dubin Garfield. Rosa Revisited. #1064
Linda Dubin Garfield
In the early 90’s I took a printmaking course and fell in love with the process. Unlike other passionate relationships that fade with time, the passion I feel for printmaking has only gotten more intense. I started exploring mixed media several years ago and have found that combing collage and monotype works for me. I also enjoy using digital photography with traditional printmaking techniques. I have expanded my visual vocabulary which creates exponential possibilities. Toulouse-Lautrec’s works speak to me. I love his line and this painting is among my favorite from the Barnes. I love the light and the mood. I never copied a master before but found the challenge invigorating. I used digital imagery, printing on organza, as well as traditional hand-pulled printmaking techniques to create my version of A Montrouge-Rosa La Rouge.

Linda Dubin Garfield, an award winning printmaker and mixed media artist, creates visual memoirs exploring the mystery of memory and the magic of place using Hand pulled traditional printmaking techniques, digital imagery and collage. In 2005 she founded ARTsisters and in 2007 she started smART business consulting. Currently she is board president of Da Vinci Art Alliance and appreciated her good fortune to make art every chance she gets.

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Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. A Montrouge–Rosa La Rouge. BF263


Joseoh Kane. No Yes No. #1033
Joseoh Kane
No yes no was developed in watercolor mixed media and addresses current issues of the day. We learn "to live together or die together." The piece speaks volumes about how especially the poor are treated.Not with love and respect but with distane.

Senior. Student at Fleishers One arm one eye one goal to have fun and enjoy this journey we all know as life.


Pablo Picasso. Acrobat and Young Harlequin (Acrobate et jeune Arlequin). BF382


Laurence de Valmy. Henri and Albert. #1067
Laurence de Valmy
My work on the POST series, is based on the life and work of some of major artists through fictional Instagram posts from the past combining an original painting and some imagined dialogues, based on accurate stories and quotes. My goals are to share about the stories behind the artworks, the connections of these artists and to make my viewers consider these iconic artworks with a renewed interest. In this POST, Henri Matisse shares about his visit to the Barnes Foundation on September 27, 1930 were he was able to see his early works including The Joy of Life and meet with Albert Barnes. During the visit, they agreed on the murals for the Central Hall which will prove to be significant in Matisse artwork evolution. Henri Matisse comment is based on a quote were he declared that "the Barnes was the only sane place to see art in America". My series also takes place in a reflection about the importance of social media for artists nowadays, the positive aspect which is how people connect but also the fact that art is often seen through a screen when nothing replaces the experience of being in front of an original artwork.

Laurence de Valmy (French born) studied art both in France and in the USA. Her work reflects on the relationship between art and modern technologies and more precisely on the use of social media by artists. She was awarded an Artist Residency by the ESKFF at Mana Contemporary, NJ in 2017 for her work on the POST series, which depicts fictional Instagram Posts of the past of famous artists. She is represented by the Galleries Azart (NY) & Kahn (UK).Her work has been shown in various group shows and major art fairs. Her paintings can be found in private collections in Europe, USA and Asia (Hubert Burda ; Eileen Kaminski collection). In June 2018, her work will be on view at the MUCA (Museum of Urban and Contemporary Art), Munich.

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Henri Matisse. Le Bonheur de vivre, also called The Joy of Life. BF719


Rachel Stern. Self Portrait as a Chubby Renoir Woman. #1082
Rachel Stern
My work focuses on ideas surrounding beauty and power. What is the relationship between the two? When walking through the Barnes Collection I was struck by how beautiful and powerful Renoir’s chubby women were. Throughout the museum I encountered in his works broad backs, fat rolls, and big legs. I so rarely see bodies that look and feel like my own in spaces that celebrate beauty, so this experience was particularly meaningful. Back in my studio I considered the meaning Renior’s gaze, of these women as subjects. While I felt reflected in their form I found no meaningful feminist content and was concerned by the location of power. Renoir did not treat the women particularly differently than the hats and other objects which surround them. So to my original question - what is the relationship between beauty and power? Here I found beauty in the subject but the power seemed to lie with the artist and his gaze and gender. With the fate of the image now in my hands, I occupy both rolls. In my work I revisit moments from the history of art and visual culture in the pose of Robin Hood — taking them back from the structures which produced them and through kitsch and the equalizing lens of the camera redistribute them for myself and my community. This self portrait describes my insecurities as much as it does my defiance as a body which occupies a position of power often excluded from the cannon of imaged female forms.

Rachel Stern (b. 1989, NYC) is a photographer whose work challenges conventions of beauty and promotes escapist, constructivist fantasy. Her work images a world that might be, built out of the world that is. It is a kitsch paradise, a queer-washed history, and an attempt at hope. She received her BFA in Photography and the History of Art and Visual Culture in 2011 from the Rhode Island School of Design, attended Skowhegan in 2014, and graduated from Columbia University in 2016 with an MFA in Visual Arts. Her work has been featured in BOMB, ArtFCity, Hyperallergic, and Matte Magazine.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Nude from the Back (Nu de dos). BF976


W Jane Foster. Dance in the light of your own North Star . #1058
W Jane Foster
The Dance by Henri Matisse melds physical movement with the architecture. And the dancers seem to extend beyond the arches. I was inspired to explore the story of one of the dancers. Posing this question: “What does she see that inspires her to dance?” I choose to believe that it is her excitement in seeing the light of her own North Star that inspires her. She dances away from us, and toward her calling. I worked with the traditional quilt format to link her with women who used this form for to express their dance.

Jane Foster is a practicing architect, professional musician and fabric artist.

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Henri Matisse. The Dance. 2001.25.50a,b,c


Janet Williams. Young Woman Holding a Smartphone. #1127
Janet Williams
Creating art is being in the present moment and capturing it.

I studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the University of Delaware. After a long hiatus from painting and after practicing yoga and meditation for many years, my interest in painting reemerged. I found a new love for it after learning to be in the present moment and appreciating the talents I had instead of always looking for something else to satisfy my happiness. I have more recently studied at Fleisher Art Memorial, PAFA and Incamminati. Lately I’ve been painting outside and have participated in a few Plein Air events. Currently, I’m gathering paintings for a show.

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Pablo Picasso. Young Woman Holding a Cigarette (Jeune femme tenant une cigarette). BF318


Victor Miller. The unidentified iron worker. #1029
Victor Miller
The unknown iron worker does his job and may or may not think he is making art. Non the less his work holds the frame in place and allows the work to hold together. Barnes I think uses the metal work in his collection in the same way.It holds the art in place.

Photographer and amateur artist!


Unidentified maker. Handle and Hinges. 01.07.71


Michelle Marcuse. Disassembled. #1174
Michelle Marcuse
I grew up in South Africa. My formative years were marked by the elitism of the Apartheid system and scarred by the early-age trauma of witnessing a silent majority struggle to exist within a state of humiliation. My artwork is rooted in childhood myths and stories and often addresses the anxiety and memories from this period. I create “spaces beyond reality” and build my narrative to establish a single message of disintegration through manipulated forms, structurally incomplete surfaces and non-rectilinear shapes. I find information in disorder and randomness. Buildup and disintegration serve as generative methods. For reference, I look at materials under duress to stimulate new forms, surface tensions and line quality. Being at the intersection of architecture, history, and culture, I relate to contemporary social issues such as dominance, the accrual of power, greed and survival. Using discarded materials [such as cardboard, paper, plastic] in my work is deliberate. I look for unexpected approaches and for elements that have vulnerabilities. These raw elements provoke experimentation. I hope to draw the viewer into questionable realities and illusions and to challenge cultural perceptions, beliefs and expectations.

Michelle Marcuse grew up in South Africa and now resides in Philadelphia, PA where she is Co-Director of HOUSEGallery exhibition space. She has shown with BLAM Projects Brooklyn, NY [2016], Arte y Amor at Taller Boricua, NYC [2016], and Borderless Caribbean at The Haitian Cultural Arts Alliance, Miami, FL [2015]. She is a recipient of a 2016 Fleisher Art Memorial Wind Challenge exhibition and awarded a full fellowship to The Vermont Studio Center. [2012]. Acquisitions of her work have been made by The USA Embassy of Bangkok, Thailand; the University of Notre Dame, Baltimore, MD, The State Museum of Pennsylvania in Harrisburg, PA, and The Philadelphia Museum of Art collection.

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Unidentified maker. Windsor Armchair. 01.17.11


Robert Reinhardt. After Cezanne. #1005
Robert Reinhardt
The act of painting has always seemed magical to me. Capturing and preserving a moment in time with a personal creative flare on a 2d surface is a skill acquired after many years of experience. Viewing Cezanne's painting of Mont Sainte-Victoire reinforces that magical quality for me. His use of strong earth colors mobilized by aggressive strokes, enabled Cezanne to create solid geometric forms that redefined the landscape genre for that era. In my recent landscapes paintings I saw his influence flow into my work on many levels. Notably the color and how his brushstrokes defined form. His surfaces have a magical quality that I tried to mirror in how I approached the watercolor for this exhibit.

My paintings explore the sensitive interconnections between the temporal elements of time and their relationship to the changing environment. The careful observer begins to discover the delicate surfaces that lie hidden among the many layers of washes layered into one final piece. The rich patinas and the weather worn surfaces magnetically draw me in as I render each image. The current series of paintings follow a recent trip to Tucson Arizona. These images bring to life a strength that lives on in these landscapes. They seem almost indifferent to the elements that continue to wear at their surfaces and daily challenge their structural integrity. At the same time this is happening Nature is painting an entirely new palette for us to see.

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Paul Cézanne. Mont Sainte-Victoire (La Montagne Sainte-Victoire). BF13


Jessica Libor. Madame. #1048
Jessica Libor
Myths and legends tell the story of where we came from and who we see ourselves as. I am inspired by the feminine spirit: my work is about the woman who is empowered to be the heroine of her own story. My aesthetic is influenced by the Rococo and Pre-Raphaelite periods of art history, as well as theater, set design, high fashion culture. This piece is a response to Renoir's work "In the Grass". I took inspiration from the dappled lighting and sense of ease and enjoyment of the outdoors, capturing the sensuous feeling of the fullness and glamour of nature, and being a part of it.

Jessica Libor is an artist from Philadelphia, PA who creates work that deal with legends and myths of women, beauty, desire, artifice, and feminine experience. She writes a blog, and also curates exhibitions through the pop-up gallery Era Contemporary. She has studied at the Florence Academy of Art, Grand Central Atelier and received her MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in 2014. She currently lives and works in Philadelphia, PA.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. On the Grass (Jeunes femmes assises dans l'herbe). BF289


Agathe Bouton. Color Chart. #1039
Agathe Bouton
For Let's connect I wanted to reinterpret the textile from the clothes in this Renoir painting. I tried to find the color palette for each clothes by creating an assemblage with actual pieces of fabrics combined with paper previously print. The fabrics give also the idea of the movement created by the dress. In immediate and almost constant contact with our skin, fabric sends us back to our intimacy as well as to the sense of touch. Agathe Bouton uses a thousand surfaces to reveal what such a material can offer when it is torn, patched, sewn, and assembled in order to become thicker and heavier, or else more refined. In the past she made huge textile Installation. With these hanging fabrics she creates moving walls and suggests a new way of inhabiting space ; an evocation of ‘fabrics drying on terraces or hanging in the tents of nomads.’ The artist guides us as we go through these works to share in this reflection on inhabited space, and its echoes of our interior space. At the same time our visual perception is appealed to by the vast chromatic palette of fabric dyed, painted, washed and faded. These textiles, in their superimposition and their transparence, can be perceived as the humble inscriptions of humanity on the material world – traces of our daily life. Marked by the deteriorations caused by exposure to the sun and the rain, these textile installations by Agathe Bouton bear witness to a memory.

Agathe Bouton is a French artist. She moved to Philadelphia 3 years ago. She works mainly in various forms of printmaking, but also in painting and collage. She has a B.F.A and M.F.A from ESAA Duperré,Paris. She has shown her art in many exhibitions in France and around Europe, as well as Australia, Japan, India, Burma, West Africa, Turkey and the USA. She has won a number of awards for her work. Some of Agathe’s work is displayed at the Gallery Martine Namy-Caulier in Paris, and in the permanent collection of the National Library of Paris. Her work breaks the boundaries of the traditional medium of engraving and etching. Her modern approach to this ancient technique means her work tends to be more colourful and pictorial.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Leaving the Conservatory (La Sortie du conservatoire). BF862


Bethann Parker. Master and Moses. #1070
Bethann Parker
My work is influenced by the same silamar interests that had inspired Barnes to set up his ensembles accordingly. By bring multiple traditions side by side we can observe their varying plastic qualities and direct influences. Through this understanding, I aim create visual conversations through the collapsing of multiple imagery that describes the discourse of relationships between my predecessors, contemporaries and self. Portrait of a Man (BF440) interested me for the vast landscapes described in Netherlandish paintings. This investigation feels familiar because it mirrors the same landscape of my own home setting in the Pocono mountains. Growing up in a home that was primarily interested in folk art, I couldn't help but make a direct correlation to this tradition and the outsider work of, Grandma Moses. Her vast landscapes carry the same plastic attributes and I wanted to bring her conversation together with that of the Netherlandish Masters. The horizontal landscape composition of my painting painting is an interpretation of a collapsed grandma Moses, with that of, Portrait of a Man. I am also interested in the conversation of formal training vs. self taught and how they can still speak the same visual language. This is why I decided to force them together and apply an expressive hand to the subject of the man as well. In this, I aimed to bring my own artist conversation to that of Grandma Moses and the Netherlandish Masters discourse of landscape.

Bethann Parker b.1984 | Philadelphia,Pa Bethann Parker is an artist living in the Pocono Mountains and working in Philadelphia. She attends the Pennsylvania Academy of Art and is expected to graduate with a Bachelors of Fine Art in 2019. Her work has been exhibited in group shows and she is the recent recipient of the Fred and Naomi Hazell Art Scholarship and Venture Fund Grant.


Hans Memling. Portrait of a Man. BF440


Joann Neufeld. Golden. #1083
Joann Neufeld
Golden Exhibiting distractingly ornate hardware around masterpieces of world art is what makes the Barnes unique among museums. The founder realized the exquisite nature of design in all formats. Noticing uncommon examples of beauty in everyday objects and images has always been my own emphasis, in both my artwork and in my teaching. To heighten observational skills while delighting in ordinary spaces, color, and light raises the delight in daily sights. Creativity is fostered through improving the ability to look and really see. This painting emphasizes the glory of golden altarpieces, symmetrical portraits, matching masks, balanced landscapes, centered abstractions, and measured distances. Chinese ‘joss’ paper may obscure most of the under paintings in order to capture the gold-framed glow in each gallery. Even the floor guidelines are honored. The hardware, while not as fanciful as those found in the Barnes Collection, displays the contemporary attempt at functional aesthetics. The organized “ensembles” reminds us to be thoughtful as we arrange our collections and our lives. Retirement has enabled me to paint regularly in my transformed closet space. An Artist’s Studio Residency would allow me to indulge in a larger canvas size while promoting the importance and significance of art. I would get to paint and teach simultaneously! Dr. Barnes and I would both be thrilled. Joann Neufeld

Joann Neufeld * Artist Educator Neshaminy High School, 1968-1971 Tyler School of Art, 1971-1978, BFA and MEd School District of Philadelphia, 1975-1998 New Hope-Solebury School District, 1998-2014 Additional instructional experience at : The University of the Arts Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art (summer session) Moore College of Art (teacher training) Exhibitions: Boston Street Gallery, Langhorne Solo Show, Architeqt Gallery, Artists of Yardley

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Master of the San Quirico Crucifix. Triptych. BF83


Amy Turner. Young Woman in Blue Chip. #1139
Amy Turner
Dr. Barnes' quote about the "ordinary person" having access to art resonated with me. I have chosen everyday materials, all found at yard sales. Old things given a new re-interpreted life. I wanted to make my "Young Woman" a bit more gender non-specific and stronger. Her skirt could be interpreted as pants and the leather gives a modern strength.

Amy is a self-taught artist originally from Los Angeles who specializes in Dog Portraits, Abstract Painting and Upcycled Mixed Media works. She has been an Antarctic traveler, baker and long distance sailor. An avid fan of music, especially jazz, those influences also are reflected in her work. Amy has lived and worked in New York City, Sag Harbor, NY, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Philadelphia.

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Amedeo Modigliani. Young Woman in Blue (Giovane donna in azzurro). BF268


Celeste Mann. 21st Century Degas in Philadelphia. #1022
Celeste Mann
"21st Century Degas in Philadelphia" honors my adult ballet friends and teachers in Philadelphia. When I saw Degas "Group of Dancers," I related to it because of the subject matter and the medium. As a pastel artist, I always look for pastel works in exhibitions, which are a rarity. They are fragile and harder to deal with than other media, so when I see one it is special. This Degas looks like a study for a future painting. It uses visible strokes and minimal colors, and the pastel doesn't fill the paper, but it communicates the togetherness and intimacy of the subjects. I wanted to portray ballet in the same medium but with diverse people, which is what I experienced dancing in Philadelphia. In my piece the dancers are different ethnicities and body types. Their identical skirts, worn in performance, unify them. Rather than face away, they are open to the viewer and hopefully show their freedom and joy in movement in their bodies. I greatly admire the work of Degas, but my goal was not to copy his style. I fill up the paper with more color, and my marks are not as salient as his. I experimented with several possible configurations. I plan to make a series, using much larger paper, based on adult ballet and perhaps another of belly dancers. In "21st Century Degas in Philadelphia," his influence is obvious, but this is a bold new piece for a new century.

Celeste Mann, originally from NYC, creatively assembles "dust." Celeste makes drawings in soft pastel and charcoal and is inspired by beauty: in everyday objects, the human face and figure, architectural wonders, nature, or the movement and music of performance. Mostly self-taught, Celeste has taken classes at PAFA in Continuing Education. Recently in exhibition there was "Selfie in Pastel." At DaVinci Art Alliance she has presented "Beyond the Tiles: Al-Andalus in Photography and Pastel" in the Pecha Kucha event, and the postcard "Cuarto de Oaxaca." "Four Empty Vases" was published in FOUNTAIN SPRAY 2017. Usually luminous and colorful, her work tends to be romantic, with Impressionist, Latin American and Spanish influences.

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Edgar Degas. Group of Dancers (Groupe de danseuses). BF213


Martha Kent Martin. Barnes. #1171
Martha Kent Martin
The Steeple Cock is an unusually placed piece of metal work at the Barnes. It isn't part of a wall picture. Rather it stands, prominently, in the center of the room and repeats the theme of primitiveness that pervades the space. It is merely decorative and does not express itself plastically by way of light, line color and space. I see it more as a punctum, a personally touching detail which establishes a direct relationship with the objects in the gallery. It unifies the African sculpture, the Modigliani, the Lautrec and the Picassos like no other piece of metal in the museum and possesses its own accidental aesthetic.

Martha Kent Martin earned her MFA from Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and her BFA in Metalsmithing from Tyler School of Art. A jewelry artist since 1979, she has shown her work locally, regionally and nationally, worked with at risk children and their adults in Philadelphia and furthered her education at the Barnes Foundation, the DeMazia Trust and the Gemological Institute of America. She has been teaching jewelry and metalsmithing at various venues within the metropolitan area since 1986. Recent exhibitions of her work include Abington Art Center, Reflection, 2017-2018, the Cosmopolitan Club of Philadelphia, 2017, the American Color Print Society and the 77th Anniversary Fall Exhibition at the Plastic Club, 2016.

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Unidentified artist. Steeple Cock (Coq de clocher). 01.22.43


Amy Orr. Barnes Ensemble. #1069
Amy Orr
In this piece, composed under the influence of the Barnes philosophy, I created an ensemble that references the relationship between ornate metalwork and the forms found in paintings of entangled women, at rest and play. I collect common artifacts, often from the street, that appeal to my artmaking obsessions, then assemble the materials into lush patterned surfaces. I am fascinated by the ordinary, drawn to commonplace artifacts for their abundance, color and inherent content. The excessive embellishment in my work, pays pays homage to the ordinary, using cultural ephemera for story telling and contemplation.

Amy Orr is an independent artist. She was a tenured professor at Rosemont College, before resigning to pursue independent projects. Orr was the director of FiberPhiladelphia 2012 and the publisher of the Artists' Guide to Philadelphia. Amy Orr’s work is exhibited internationally and written about frequently. Exhibitions include those in Sitges, Spain, SOFA, NY and Chicago, Delaware Center for Contemporary Art, Temple Gallery, Philadelphia, Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, Morris Museum, Texas Quilt Museum and the Philadelphia Art Alliance. Orr has a BFA in Fine Arts from Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem, Israel, an MA from UArts and an MFA in Fibers/Crafts from Tyler School of Art, Temple University.

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Unidentified maker. Door Knocker. 01.02.11


Pamela Tudor. #100 Years Later. #1087
Pamela Tudor
I am always drawn to Modigliani’s work, and in particular this painting of the “Redheaded Girl in Evening Dress”, looking frankly at the viewer after what looks like quite an evening out. I imagined what she would be like, exactly 100 years later, and she became Contemporary Woman, confident, strong, attractive and proud. I left her face blank so that the viewer can project onto her, i.e., who and what she might be. Let the mystery remain.

PNT is a painter and creator of three-dimensional shadow boxes. She works in acrylics and mixed media. Many of her expressive paintings focus on our beautiful planet and concerns about climate change. After receiving an M.A. in Applied Psychology she went to art school for four years (NY Studio School,The Art Students League). Pamela has shown at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the Noyes Museum in Oceanville, NJ, and the El Paso Museum of Art. Her work is in private collections in NY, NJ, Philadelphia, Miami and Los Angeles. She is a member of Inliquid and The DaVinci Art Alliance. RECENT SOLO SHOWS Hard Rain’s Gonna Fall, Dec-March 2018, Courtyard Hotel, Phila Navy Yard Mother Earth, Sept–Dec 2017, Or Hadash, Ft.Washington, PA

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Amedeo Modigliani. Redheaded Girl in Evening Dress (Jeune fille rousse en robe de soir). BF206


Photolope. Reflections. #1115
Photolope
This piece has three main points of inspiration, all of which illustrate how times have changed since Dr. Barnes first acquired Renoir's "Bather Gazing at Herself in the Water": A few years ago, I was lucky enough to see Van Gogh's "The Starry Night" in person and was struck by how many people were simply taking photos of it on their phones and then looking at their photo, not the work of art. That stuck with me and this work was partially inspired by how technology impacts our appreciation of art and natural beauty to the point that our surroundings no longer matter to us. I also wanted this piece to confront society's image of "thin = beauty." Dr. Barnes' collection contains many works of women in various states of undress who appear comfortable with their bodies and their nudity at a time before society began telling us, women AND men, that curves and extra pounds aren't desirable. Lastly, I used the iPhone as the reflection point to illustrate how the modern gay man's self image is oftentimes reflected to him only through online likes and messages through dating/hookup apps.

My photography has always been about capturing moments. The beauty of an approaching storm, or the feeling of awe when immersed in nature, or the empathy that comes from a glimpse into the life of another human being. When I encounter these moments, I want what I capture to blossom into a moment in the viewer's day where they can see, feel, or understand just a little bit more.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Portrait of Félix Hippolyte-Lucas. BF595


Carissa Latona. Guardless. #1023
Carissa Latona
I immediately connected with Matisse's paintings, one facing the other in the collection, involving bold colors and figures whose minds seemed far away from the room they were in. As I researched these pieces, a similar Matisse painting appeared, called "The Silence that Lives in Houses". I found this to be highly applicable as I originally thought of my own family sitting in the room Matisse depicted in "Two Young Girls in a Red and Yellow Interior". My submission is a mixture of words, colors, and texture that represents my overall style as an artist, as I often configure individual words from literature into quotes and poems. The hinge represents two people bound together, with a theme in the room surrounding them, and barriers - perceived or apparent - that may hinder them from expressing their honest thoughts. The electrical tape is present for its color, but also symbolizes electric synapses (and the potential for synaptic dysfunction) in the brain. The quote itself is my reflection on a caretaker-taker relationship that I was exposed to during my childhood and early adult life. I do hope you will enjoy this work, whether you find it relevant to your own story or can simply tie it to the inspiration piece.

​I am originally from New York and lived in Wilmington, Delaware before making the move to Philadelphia. I often weave my family history or current situations into my art as a way to express things often unexpressed in the past. To me, art is something that is deeply personal, but also provides the opportunity to connect with others. I have been working creatively for as long as I can remember and I enjoy making things that people can relate to - especially if they inspire motivation or reflection.

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Henri Matisse. Two Young Girls in a Red and Yellow Interior (Deux fillettes, fond jaune et rouge). BF2075


Davinica Nemtzow. Pots en terre cuite et fleurs exotiques. #1028
Davinica Nemtzow
My piece is inspired by Paul Cézanne's "Pots de terre cuite et fleurs" (Terracotta Pots and Flowers). While Cézanne is known for painting plants in some form (often fruit), we don't often see as much of a focus on greenery as we do in "Pots de terre cuite et fleurs". I think this focus, in combination with the fact that terracotta pots are still an object we find in almost every household, makes this piece relatable and timeless. Often incorporating plants, my work explores the expression of power and growth through a more "feminine" subject matter. I wanted to mimic the composition of Cézanne's piece through the arrangement of pots and flatness in the background, relying on texture to create depth more than perspective. In a similar way that Cézanne highlights the contrast between the manmade pots and bottles and the growth of the geraniums, I chose a window with bars to show the contrast between urban and natural life. While Cézanne painted the Geraniums during the winter in his father's residence, I chose tropical plants to symbolize the sanctuary I have created for myself when I need growth and light to combat the harsh winters in the city.

Davinica grew up in the artists' haven of the Berkshires and attended Moore College of Art & Design, graduating with honors in 2011. At Moore, she found her identity as a feminist, leader, and artist. With a commitment to tikkun olam (the Jewish philosophy of repairing the world), Davinica is passionate about using her illustration and graphic design skills to support nonprofits and companies with a social justice mindset. After working as a graphic designer for the first few years out of school, she is returning to her illustration practice while running Creating United Empowerment, a nonprofit charitable online art gallery that she founded in 2017.

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Paul Cézanne. Terracotta Pots and Flowers (Pots en terre cuite et fleurs). BF235


John Attanasio. Ensemble. #1024
John Attanasio
Observers are attracted to paintings that speak to them. Together, they can form an “ensemble.”

John Attanasio lives and paints mostly in Philadelphia and Down East Maine. He exhibits regularly in group shows at several Philadelphia venues and has held solo shows at the Philadelphia Sketch Club and Twenty-Two Gallery. John studied painting at Fleisher Art Memorial and Woodmere Art Museum under artists trained at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. He has also studied portraiture at Studio Incamminati. He is a member of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, The Plastic Club, Twenty-Two Gallery and the Center for Emerging Visual Artists. He has a bachelor's degree in economics from Harvard University and a law degree from George Washington University.

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Vincent van Gogh. The Smoker (Le Fumeur). BF119


JANIE GROSS. Homage to Renoir. #1140
JANIE GROSS
Nature is my artistic medium. I draw my inspiration from flowers that I press in order to preserve their beauty, for eternity. My search for new ways to restate the element of surprise that I experience when observing nature, is motivated by the magic that occurs after a flower is pressed and transformed into a two dimensional specimen. Then, by combining photographic technique with nature, I am able to push the boundaries of an ancient practice. “Homage to Renoir” depicts just one red anemone that was inconceivably plucked from his painting (BF532), pressed, and then sent into heaven. By digitally altering only the sky’s hue, I have playfully noted Renoir’s revered attention to the power of color placement. Miraculously, the anemone itself, unaltered by technology, is just as I found it inside my flower press.

BFA, Moore College of Art and Design, Philadelphia, PA • Published book: author, designer, photographer (1999) “The Afterlife of Flowers”- full-color, hardcover, 11x11, 96 pages. Distribution - Running Press; Fourth printing; United States, Austria, England, Germany, Switzerland • Pioneered curriculum: pioneered and taught flower pressing courses as faculty member of Longwood Gardens (2000-2006) • Distinguished Alumna - Moore College of Art & Design (2006) • Judge - Philadelphia Flower Show, pressed plant classes (2000-2007) • Certificate of Merit in Floral Design - Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square, PA (1999)


Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Flowers (Fleurs). BF532


Patricia Moss-Vreeland. The Ordinariness of each day Became Heroic. #1188
Patricia Moss-Vreeland
I have been interested in all of Cezanne’s work for a long time, but his Card Players, is one that retained a memory. I realized that it was observing men in this activity; and I wondered what the women could be doing. In response, I created a piece where women are working, sewing together, a historical gesture, and one of companionship in a different way. And then I imagined their sewing becoming actual wings, which took flight all around them. The men sit around the table like one of his still lives, and my women form a row, a compositional banding that I employ, that integrates production, creativity, and transformation. Therefore my title, The Ordinariness of Each day became Heroic. I am attracted to how Cezanne used paint to carve out his figures and space, each becoming a facet in his exploration of creating a different pictorial space. My compositions are faceted, reflecting how I see reality, and how memory is formed by making connections between these disparate parts. I have also been an early supporter of John Dewey’s thoughts and work on education and art, through his Art as Experience, and his contribution to Barnes. They formed an invaluable partnership, where these ideas could be woven into his art collection, making this available as a teaching tool. My work follows in this tradition. I use art and exhibition in public spaces, to engage people with the chance to look and learn, a successful relationship for art.

Patricia Moss-Vreeland’s paintings and drawings have been exhibited nationally at the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Institute of Contemporary Art. She is in many permanent collections, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago and The Norton Museum. Moss-Vreeland won a national competition to design the Memorial Room for the Holocaust Museum Houston, earning four awards, including the American Institute of Architects Honor award in Design. Moss-Vreeland received the Art-in-Science XIV Commission for Memory-Connections Matter, EKG, University City Science Center, Philadelphia, that traveled to the University of St. Thomas, MN.

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Paul Cézanne. The Card Players (Les Joueurs de cartes). BF564


Lisa Abaya. Ensemble of Cultures. #1020
Lisa Abaya
This pair of earrings draws their inspiration from the Inagaki mask, a piece of anonymously carved wood with only a region and broad time span to define its origins. This lacking narrative invites the viewer to imagine the motives of the creator, and the depth of the item’s cultural significance. Are ideologies, context and conflicts lost or preserved through a beautiful object? The importance of conserving items of culture intrigued me to create an artifact of my own. My history is a culture of hybridity, a fusion of peoples that would not otherwise be connected. Both my mother and my grandmother built metaphorical bridges between Mexicans, Chinese and Serbians through marriage, with their offspring as an embodiment of this connection. What is culturally normal for me, I now realize is abnormal for most of the world. These earrings combine precious materials of China and Africa, to symbolize the union of my marriage. I use jewelry because it is a descriptive artifact, not merely an item of adornment but a vehicle for narrating a new story through its beauty. These earrings are meant to be worn with the intention of interlocking form and history.

Lisa Abaya is a native west coast artist based in Philadelphia. She completed her BFA through a joint program between the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the University of Pennsylvania. Her thirteen years of studying dance at the San Fransisco Ballet School has influenced her painting, enhancing her sensitivity to movement and fluidity of gesture. Lisa looks to her heritage of Mexican, Serbian and Chinese descent to revisit traditional symbols, motifs and themes.

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Unidentified artist. Mask (Gunyege). A128


Monica Rose Fotusky. Primary Woman . #1071
Monica Rose Fotusky
As I was searching for my inspiration, out of the many timeless artists that have a home in the Barnes, I kept being pulled in by Matisse. Matisse has truly helped define radical contemporary art. His mastery of the expressive language of color, and the feelings they emote to the beholders, are displayed in every piece throughout his whole career. I really resonate with the emotions colors can influence. I, myself, work with bold colors for the same purpose. In my accession, piece 73, (Seated Riffian) the colors chosen are mostly primary colors. The basic colors you’d find in a box of crayons. One might simply think these colors are dull, simple, childish even. But, when looking into the psychology of color, you find there is a lot more to it than what meets the eye. The use of red and orange invoke feelings of strength, passion, aggression, determination and dynamic energy. The use of yellow invokes feelings of happiness but, also can symbolize caution and trepidation. Blue and green bring harmony to the warm hues. Blue invokes stability, knowledge, peace. Green represents prosperity and growth. Just by simply analyzing the use of color in 73, not only can you can start to understand what the artist and the subject are feeling in their mutual share of energy; but, you can also begin to feel the power of mixed, yet balanced emotion. These strong, resonating feelings are what I look to invoke in my audience through my pieces.

Monica Fotusky is a fine artist and actress in the greater Philadelphia area. Monica typically works with acrylics to create her work but, also enjoys carving/printing and, recycling art to create anew. Her work is a balanced flow of geometric and organic shape brought together by bold color. Monica has also worked as a Scenic Artist, painting sets, backdrops and props for Greater Ocean City Theater company, West Chester Summer Stage and Limelight Theatre company. On top of painting, Monica performs with two theatre companies in the Philadelphia area; Without a Cue Productions LLC and, Elephant Room Productions. Monica’s ultimate goal with her art is to spread the message of acceptance of imperfect beauty while giving back to the community


Henri Matisse. Seated Riffian (Le Rifain assis). BF264


Joseph Barbella. Portrait of Tim. #1155
Joseph Barbella
I chose BF21, Paul Cezanne’s Four Peaches on a Plate (Quatre pêches sur une assiette), 1890–1894. Oil on canvas, Overall: 10 x 15 in. (25.4 x 38.1 cm).   My initial thought of the painting was about the texture on the canvas. Cezanne’s use of color to block out 3 dimensional objects in a two dimensional world also attracted my attention. He seemed to care about the 3 dimensional space and the flat two dimensional pattern at the same time. I have a new found appreciation for Cezanne’s work, especially his still-lives of fruit and cloth on tables, and all the impressionistic artists at the exhibit. So I went to my canvas and thought about texture and color blocking as well as Albert C. Barnes’ structure and symmetry. I applied a thick and sculptural layer of gesso on the canvas that resembled stucco or stone and then I proceeded with oils for my painting, “Portrait of Tim”. I decided on a portraiture for my image and my partner Tim was my unsuspecting model.

I graduated from the University of the Arts with a BFA in painting and illustration. Most of my paintings are representational with a concentration in portraitures and still lives.The portraits are an attempt to represent a person and their emotion that arises in the process. I also sometimes apply a sculptural texture with the oil paint in gesso to add teeth to the canvas. One directional lighting is used to find the architecture of the body or object. My intention for the viewer is to focus completely on the subject matter with no peripheral distractions in a clean, uncomplicated, and stark environment alluding to a tranquil stillness in the painting. www.joebarbella.com

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Paul Cézanne. Four Peaches on a Plate (Quatre pêches sur une assiette). BF21


Sandi Pierantozzi. Pendant. #1051
Sandi Pierantozzi
I am inspired by the world around me. Nature, architecture, jewelry, metalwork, pattern and textiles, are constant sources for me. I grew up around vintage jewelry and fabric, and those things continue to inspire my work. My choice of the French Fireplace Utensil as inspiration for my wire pendant, stems from my love of wrought iron work. Whenever I go to the Barnes, I am always impressed and inspired by everything on view. However, I gravitate toward the decorative arts, especially the iron work. It is such a resource for surface design on pottery, as well as a wealth of inspiration for wire work in jewelry. I have chosen to make wearable jewelry because it can communicate the mood or personality of the person wearing it. In this "age of communication," where most communicating is done electronically, a handmade object such as jewelry, contains the soul and energy of the maker, and when worn, a human connection is made. These basic connections between people keep our souls alive.

Sandi Pierantozzi was born and raised in Philadelphia, and has a background in graphic design and print making. Following her career in graphic design, her work has taken another path as a maker of pottery and jewelry, which she has been doing for over 25 years. Her pottery has been featured in Studio Potter, Ceramics Monthly, Clay Times and over a dozen books on clay work. She has presented numerous workshops across the country, and has exhibited her work nationally and abroad. Her work is in both museum and private collections.

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Unidentified maker. Fireplace Utensil (Servante). 01.08.02


Mia Rosenthal. Barnes. #1085
Mia Rosenthal
People have been drawing for at least 30,000 years – there is something fundamental about observing, processing that information, and then picking up a tool to draw it in ones own hand, with one’s own voice. I relate to this idea very closely, and feel that I’m part of this flow of history, from then until now, of artists who are fascinated by and draw from the real world. Not in the sense of a need to duplicate, but to explore, learn, select, organize, and build through thought and marks. I enjoyed the opportunity to explore the Barnes collection and use it as the inspiration for a piece. What sets the Barnes apart is the unique way the works of art are hung, and the types of work that are displayed together. Non-traditional art objects such as hinges, forks and trivets are hung alongside furniture, pottery and paintings. Creating a drawing of one such ensemble allowed me the opportunity to carefully study each piece, and in doing so made new discoveries both in individual works and in the connections between them. Because the Barnes collection is so large, with works hung much closer together than modern audiences are used to seeing, it can be challenging to truly take in the ensembles as well as study each piece as a unique artwork. My drawing flattens out the three-dimensional pieces, creating a unity between them and the two-dimensional works, as well as simplifying both the forms and color. The result is both a documentation of a Barnes ensemble, and a totally new, contemporary artwork. I chose as my focus piece Picasso’s Girl with a Goat as it is the most prominent work in that particular grouping.

Mia Rosenthal was awarded a Leonore Annenberg Fellowship Fund Grant and a Vermont Studio Center fellowship. Her drawings are included in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, The Columbus Museum, Woodmere Art Museum, and the Arkansas Arts Center. Recent exhibitions include: Holograph: Women on Paper at the Columbus Museum, Columbus GA; Spatial Flux: Contemporary Drawings from the JoAnn Gonzalez Hickey Collection at the Gregory Allicar Museum of Art, Fort Collins, CO; Mia Rosenthal: Paper Lens at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA; Mid-winter group show at Gallery Joe, Philadelphia, PA and Referenced, Danese/Corey, New York, NY.

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Pablo Picasso. Girl with a Goat (La Jeune fille à la chèvre). BF250


Michael F Secor. Santa Ferverosa. #1042
Michael F Secor
Painting is space, light, and time. I always think about these ideas in the making process. My paintings choose to depict images from my personal surroundings, spaces, objects, sometimes people, hoping to convey an appreciation for a moment that would otherwise come and go without consideration.

He grew up in Kentucky. His formal art training was completed at Centre College (BA) and Louisiana State University (MFA). The keys to life are being outside, making drawings, finding the right people, and appreciating good food and drink.

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Quill Pen Santero. Saint Michael (San Miguel). BF622


Sarah Haenn. Transition. #1271
Sarah Haenn
Raoul Dufy “The Departure of the Six-Meter Boats (La Sortie des six mètres)” I was drawn into the placement of the painting by Albert Barnes. Above a doorway. An entrance to another space, imagining the movement of a person walking and looking up. A Transition. Dufy’s Transition, from day into night. Invisible wind moving the boats. Colorful, Decorative Style. Felt connected to my own work, drawn from Experiences at the Beach, on the Water, with People. My years spent at Sailing Camp. My piece is a homage to Dufy + the Fauvism Movement. Non-naturalistic Colours, Wild Loose dabs of Paint Subjects are simplified + appear abstract A Transition of Day, Space, and Individuals moving through Dufy’s Painting, My Piece, Barnes Museum.

As an emerging artist, my work focuses on Experiences. Whether it be a specific Experience of a place, or to make work that the viewer can Experience and enter into metaphorically. I draw inspiration from places that have brought ultimate gratification and happiness to either myself, or another. As a textile designer and fine artist, I use silk screening - in an unconventional way - as my mode for making. This way of working has become a way of documenting and remembering times, spaces, and places. In addition, I hope that the work evokes similar emotions for others whom view the work. Rhode Island School of Design, BFA Textiles 2016

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Raoul Dufy. The Departure of the Six-Meter Boats (La Sortie des six mètres). BF959


Gregory Maier. Reclining woman and child. #1119
Gregory Maier
Nudes and goddesses have been represented throughout art history.Symbols have been found throughout Europe in cave drawings and figurine sculpture.A timeless statement about feminine beauty,regeneration and the power of creation.

Born and educated in Philadelphia where I studied art and design at Community College of Philadelphia.In the 1980's I moved to California and continued to work in different media including photography,pastels,and oils.In 2016 I returned to my roots in Philadelphia,where I engage in a vibrant art scene.I approach painting and drawing from the standpoint of having fun,enjoying the journey.Learning along the way about mistakes,the process and what Kandinsky called the good accident.I feel most alive,when in the zone of creation,closest to my soul.

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Henri Matisse. Reclining Nude with Blue Eyes (Nu couché aux yeux bleus). BF955


Leroy Johnson. "Sanctuary". #1036
Leroy Johnson
Viewing and "Feeling" the paintings of Horace Pippin, specifically in this case Giving Thanks (BF990), evokes the memories I have of my childhood home. A large kitchen with wooden floors, a huge black cast iron, a wood burning stove, on which my mother cooked and heated that heavy, solid iron she used for pressing our clothes. There was a large kitchen table around which the adults in my extended family ate their meals, read the newspapers and discussed current events and politics. Like Pippin's kitchen, my childhood home was filled with handcrafted items, quilts, blankets, rugs, crocheted and knitted doilies, clothing and the like. Horace Pippin's paintings in the Barnes collection illustrate for me the descriptions and stories told to me by my grandmother, who was born in the 1890's, about her childhood. I see in the composition and palette of Pippin, a striving for harmony and security. Building a wall from which he can be an observer and recorder, simultaneously exposing his vulnerability and sensitivity to the viewer's gaze. A desire and need forged in migration, war, and existence in a nation where terrorism still confronted African Americans.

Leroy Johnson (b. 1937) is a mixed-media artist whose work takes the form of painting, collage, and assemblage sculpture. A native of Philadelphia, his work is poetic and reflective of his many experiences in the inner city. Johnson has exhibited widely, with past solo shows at Philadelphia's Magic Gardens, Tirza Yalon Kolton Ceramic Gallery (Tel Aviv), Gloucester County College (Sewell, NJ), and the Camden County Historical Society. He has received grants from the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, the Independence Foundation, and the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. Johnson received a Masters of Human Services from Lincoln University (1986-88), and was a 2014 Pew Fellow at the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage. He has been a participating/resident artist for several community-based arts projects, including for Ile Ife, The Village of Arts and Humanities, Taller Puertoqueno, and The Church of the Advocate, St. Francis Academy, in Baltimore. Most recently, he was selected for the Woodmere Annual: 77th Juried Exhibition at the Woodmere Art Museum, Philadelphia, PA, in spring 2018; was included in the two-person exhibition “#WE HAVE NO PRESIDENT” (with Sara McEaney) at Marginal Utility, Philadelphia, PA; and was the inaugural resident artist at Art Barn in Amaranth, Amaranth, PA in 2017.


Horace Pippin. Giving Thanks. BF990


Steve Martin. Men playing checkers. #1037
Steve Martin
I seek out striking expressions within nature as well as the manmade; contrasts of light, color, and space, the clashing of the stark and rigid against the soft and inevitable make for great subjects. The suspension of pigment in oil is just the perfect medium for me to express my creativity through. It’s various qualities of drying, layering, mixing, and movement perform to compliment my process and aesthetic. Additional tools may strengthen a concept in its mark making, denying the paints smooth, luscious characteristic. Building the surface on which to paint on from scratch is an important process in making art for me, as it reinforces my connection to the work. The finished produced is that much more mine to claim and offer.

I did much of my physical growing up in the South Jersey/Southeastern Pennsylvania region of the United States. My creative and educational betterment was performed in Oglethorpe‘s Georgia on two separate occasions. My experiences have had me living in a few eastern seaboard cities, their surrounding communities, and accented by frequent visits to various cities across North America and in Western Europe. The urban life contrasted by its immediate suburbs has become a familiar, comfortable, and inspiring setting upon which I feel compelled to share in my paintings.

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Robert Lotiron. Two Men Playing Backgammon. BF376


Jude Lang. La femme écorché. #1010
Jude Lang
My work is a response to “Le Lapin écorché”, a painting about being on the edges, unrecognized, victim and victuals. The image is sexual and violent. Soutine seems of our moment, but perhaps every moment is his. Being the outsider, culturally, esthetically, emotionally; people still actually physically shy away from his paintings. I want to embrace them.

Jude Lang holds an MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. A native New Yorker, she has lived in and worked as an Art Director/Graphic Designer in New York City, New Haven CT, Washington D.C. and Philadelphia. She balances an active studio practice with an on-going design business, exploring how they nourish and sustain each other.

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Chaim Soutine. Flayed Rabbit (Le Lapin écorché). BF333


Frank Wermuth. Escaping Eden. #1055
Frank Wermuth
"Scenes from the Book of Genesis: the Creation of Eve, the Marriage of Adam and Eve, the Temptation, and the Expulsion" I have chosen the above work as my jumping off point. Religion, specifically the Catholic Religion has played a large part in my upbringing. I grew in, through and away from the church and it's beliefs. I now see it from a different perspective, the outside. I do believe in god but without the middle man. This religion has a long history of subjugating women. Eve, the first, was at once a partner and life giver but also the deceiver, the devils tool. She was a creation of mans need to control his world within their gods creation, without the blame. I am bringing her into the light and out of her man made prison with this black and white metallic print titled “Escape Eden”. Frank M. Wermuth

I was born to a large Catholic family living in the Kensington area of Philadelphia in 1957. The third of nine children. In the sports oriented crowded house it was easy to diappearinto day dreams. Around the age of twelve I found painting. I painted anything, from a neighbor dog, old family photos and album covers. In public high school I took every art class that I could. By senior year I had four of my seven courses were painting and sculpture classes. To this point my artistic influences were minimal. In the late seventies I attended Hussian School of Art. Unfortunately I was insecure and ill prepared. I struggled through the commercial courses but enjoyed the drawing and painting classes. My work took on a surrealist tone wit

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Unidentified artist. Scenes from the Book of Genesis: the Creation of Eve, the Marriage of Adam and Eve, the Temptation, and the Expulsion. BF1051


Gloria Rohlfs. Interpretation of the Allee of chestnut Trees by Cezanne. #1123
Gloria Rohlfs
My interpretation of Cezanne’s Allee of Chestnut Trees (#BF 939) focuses on and emphasizes the lines, many vertical but also horizontal, as well as the colors in the original piece, relating in a new way in line with Dr. Barnes’ tradition. I was drawn to the subject matter of trees in nature and the colors, which felt peaceful. The art that I create is inspired by my interest in the environment, psychology, peace, sociology, human rights and earth-based spirituality.

Biography Gloria Rohlfs was born in Sioux City, Iowa, and lives in Philadelphia, PA. She previously lived in Iowa; Munich, Germany; N.Y.C.; and the Catskills, N.Y. Rohlfs creates her art utilizing acrylics, fabric, photography and found objects. Her earlier work involved quilting. Her art is inspired by her interest in the environment, psychology, peace, sociology, human rights and earth-based spirituality. Rohlfs’s work has been exhibited in group shows in upstate NY; New York City; and Philadelphia, PA. Exhibition Record Group Exhibitions 2018 Imperfect Gallery, Philadelphia, PA 2017 William Way Community Center, Juried Show, Philadelphia, PA Imperfect Gallery, Philadelphia, PA Dirty Franks, Juried Show, Philadelphia, PA Pla


Paul Cézanne. The Allée of Chestnut Trees at the Jas de Bouffan (L'allée des marronniers au Jas de Bouffan). BF939


Natasha Zeta. The New Synthetic (Girl before a Mirror). #1285
Natasha Zeta
If possible, please hang at eye-level height as this is integral to the concept. Picasso's Head of a Woman depicts it’s titular subject in the sharp planes indicative of analytic Cubism, a system of analyzing objects and deconstructing them into flat geometric planes using multiple vantage points. Later, Synthetic Cubism introduced brighter colors, more integrated planes, and collage elements from the artist’s surroundings. The New Synthetic is a departure into a third perspective --one that reflects and moves with the environment of the viewer; a real-time experience flattened into a two-dimensional plane. The subject becomes both viewer and artist, two-dimensional and three-dimensional, real and of the artist’s imagination. The Barnes organizes artwork not by period, style or media but by color, line and form--all indispensable components of cubism. In process, I rigorously rearranged these elements, but also introduced mirror. In galleries of seemingly mismatched objects devoid of explanatory labels, the Barnes forces viewers to create their own relationships. The New Synthetic relinquishes control similarly: the boundaries of the painting expand beyond its frame; the viewer constantly experiences a new image and relationship. Lastly, I address the concept of Let’s Connect Philly, welcoming any Philadelphia artist into one space, by introducing the reflection as a representation of our community. Native and new Philadelphians, international visitors and those who make Philadelphia beautiful and inspiring are all part of this experience. Multiple perspectives, backgrounds, and stories held present in one frame.

Natasha Zeta was slung from one side of the globe to the other at a young age, forcing her to create and recreate her origin story with varying complexity. Fixated on repressed narratives, Zeta redefines the malleable parameters of realism and traditional portraiture in an attempt to capture subverted memories and sensitivities.

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Pablo Picasso. Head of a Woman (Tête de femme). BF421


Susan Krisch. Hemlocks at Dusk. #1199
Susan Krisch
Though I've been to the Barnes in the past, I've never been so drawn to the works of Soutine. There is something about the way he communicates the emotion of the space, the figure, the subject in such a simple but visceral way that I felt I needed to connect to. Despite my career, I often find myself struggling to process, fully feel and express states in such a clear way - it is a process of struggle and letting go. I decided to undertake this, and to let Soutine's work "Group of Trees" carry me as I took a trip into the woods after a particularly difficult week.

Susan Krisch is an artist and art therapist based in South Philadelphia. Susan received a Master's in counseling and art therapy at Drexel University, and utilizes this in work with community mental health, to assist others as they process, explore, learn and share about their experiences, their struggles, their inner strength. Susan believes in the power of art to help those in our community find their voice, and to communicate those things which are often too difficult to put into words. As an art therapist, the healing nature of art-marking and its connection to identity, experience and emotion are inseparable from the act of creation. Susan seeks to create spaces and work within the community that make art accessible to all.

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Chaim Soutine. Group of Trees (Groupe d'arbres). BF331


Christa Walck. Runaway Fruit. #1061
Christa Walck
I have a strong affinity for the still life. In 2014, I conducted an intensive study of the still life genre, and was intrigued by contemporary interpretations of the genre in painting and photography. To prepare for this submission, I studied all of the still lifes in the Barnes Collection. As many were painted by Cézanne, I read "The World is an Apple: The Still Lifes of Paul Cézanne," edited by Benedict Leca (2014), as well as "Cézanne's Objects" by Joel Meyerowitz (2017). I was intrigued by Cézanne's use of personal objects in his studio for his still lifes, so I decided to use an object with personal meaning to me, a Russian Gzhël teapot purchased in St. Petersburg decades ago. Nonetheless, I selected not a Cézanne, but Matisse's Blue Still Life. I chose this painting because of Matisse's vibrant colors, its many blues, and its composition of colorful fruit with an interesting object on a table. I used a similar but simplified composition, retaining the angled table, fruit and an object, but highlighting the S-curve that starts on the upper left with floral wallpaper, curves into the fruit on the table, and then cascades down the tablecloth on the lower right in a dense blue pattern. I recreated this S-curve exclusively in fruit that appears to hover above the table, climb the wall and cascade to the floor. I also simplified the composition to make it more contemporary, akin to the reductive still lifes of Tom Wesselmann.

Christa Walck is a recently retired university professor now engaged in the study and making of art. After working and exhibiting in fiber arts for a decade, she recently returned to painting (acrylics), drawing (colored pencil and iPad), and photography (digital and film). In 2016 she had an exhibition, Beyond the Fifth Floor, with Max Seel at the Kerridge Gallery in Hancock, Michigan, and is preparing for a new exhibition this summer at Galerie Boheme in Calumet, Michigan. She resides in Philadelphia and spends summers in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.


Henri Matisse. Blue Still Life (Nature morte bleue). BF185


Leila Ghasempor. Listen to the Silence. #1214
Leila Ghasempor
On one hand, my own works reflect my deep concern about the destruction of war and violence on human beings and universe especially mothers and children. On the other hand, my style is curvilinear and close to Matisse's style. I decided to combine my own style with Matisse and bring a new concept to this musing dance scene. My concept is about the power of women and their resistance to do everything in war to save their children. No matter how much women have been brutalize by instigating male powers, who are depicted as black shadows of men who standing for ISIS; mothers always stand up to save their chilren. Here in this composition women are tormented by their interaction with the dark figures. Women have been brutalized by ISIS in many ways and at the same time these evil rebels believe they will go to the hell if they be killed by the Kurdish Peshmerga Women Soldiers. Which here the power of women is highlighted more. What I show her is the dynamic power and courage of women to fight against darkness and hope to overcome that. In addition, arches that Matisse made reminded me of mosques's arches which are symbolizing a victory of goodness against evil, which here I kept that to highlight the concept more. That is the story that my work "Listen to the Silence," depicts.

Leila Ghasempor (Kurdish b.1984) is a multidisciplinary artist and activist. Her conceptual oeuvre in diverse media—paper, sculpture, installation, performance—has a strong social and poetic component. Her work draws from her experiences growing up in the midst of the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988), during which time her family was displaced. Her expressive and emotional works reference both universal and culturally specific symbols of human pain, especially how war effects children. Ghasempor’s work have been featured in 3 solo exhibitions and over 20 group exhibitions in U.S and Spain. Her scholarships include Underwood-Alger, Robert Ralph Ford Memorial Art, Lykins Family, Harvey and Alwayne Gunderson, CURCS Grant.

Website

Henri Matisse. Study for the Dance Mural. BF1091


Ed Bronstein. Harold Haskins (after Cezanne). #1190
Ed Bronstein
I have recently been painting portraits of an older friend of mine, Harold Haskins. Having been in the Barnes Museum many times, beginning when it was still in Merion, I have always been drawn to Paul Cezanne's work. The last time I was at the Barnes, which was for this competition, I was drawn to "Peasant Standing with Arms Crossed". His "stretched" vertically, and his crossed arms struck me as being similar in attitude to Harold, who at one time was a Vice President at the University of Pennsylvania and cuts an impressive figure, not unlike the Peasant in Cezanne's painting.

I have lived, worked, and helped to raise our children in Center City, Philadelphia since 1966. I practiced Architecture for over 30 years, including stints with Louis Kahn and Robert Venturi, and taught Architecture at Drexel University from 1982 to 2012. I began painting in 1989, as a Continuing Education student at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and at Fleisher Art Memoria. My oils and pastels have been shown at galleries in Philadelphia, Baltimore, Wilmington, Manchester, VT, and a variety of locations in New Jersey. In the fall of 2005, AMERICAN ARTIST magazine published a 6 page illustrated article about my work entitled 'For Love of Brush and Paint".

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Paul Cézanne. Peasant Standing with Arms Crossed (Paysan debout, les bras croisés). BF209


Cavin Jones. The Garden. #1135
Cavin Jones
In response to Matisse's dance mural which evokes his cut paper collages of his late style I chose to do an actual cutout collage on canvas. Barnes' collected works on the second floor all have a flat surface quality to them that is very modern. I play with this "flatness" while simultaneously evoking a sense of space and environment, just as the dance mural does and this idea is in most of the other paintings. I wanted to do this with my submission. I kept my forms simple and direct using the formal qualities of shapes and line. I play with some of the (negative) cut out shapes so that they actually read as positive shapes and vice versa.

I am a native Philadelphian and I am a Philadelphia-based artist with a Masters Degree in Fine Arts/Painting from Washington University in St. Louis and a Bachelor's Degree in Fine Arts/Painting from Tyler School of Art. I have exhibited my artwork in museums and galleries locally and nationally. Notable venues of exhibitions include; the Woodmere Museum, Phila., Pa. the Harriet Tubman Museum, Macon, Ga., Seraphin Gallery, Phila., Pa. and the African American Museum of Phila. I have received and executed various private mural and portrait commissions in Philadelphia, West Virginia and New Jersey I have artwork in various private and public collections such as The Princeton Museum of Art's Prints Collection.

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Henri Matisse. The Dance. 2001.25.50a,b,c


Joseph S Klimczak Jr. Distant Memory. #1043
Joseph S Klimczak Jr
I have had the privilege to be a guard for the Barnes Foundation for 3 years, and in that time I've spent a great deal of time with the art and allowing it to influence how I take my photos. When I went on a trip with some friends I had two artist in my mind when taking those shots. William Glackens and Paul Cezenne as these were the two artist in the collection that I really connected to. When I came upon this path of trees. One of the images that popped into my mind was the Cezenne's painting Allee of Chestnut in Gallery 2. Creating depth of field in photography is a tricky technique. Doing so in a painting had to be an equal challenge but Cezenne pulled it off in this painting. The other is the uses of the bench in the shot which is another Cezenne technique. Where I placed an object in my composition that not only helps balance the image but also helps tell the story.

Born and raised in Upper Darby Pennsylvania. Joined the Navy right out of height school, attended Delaware County Community College for photography, been shooting photography for 7-8 years, Been working for the Barnes Foundation as Security Guard for 3 years.


Paul Cézanne. The Allée of Chestnut Trees at the Jas de Bouffan (L'allée des marronniers au Jas de Bouffan). BF939


Tim Barton. Captured. #1156
Tim Barton
My rested upon art form is creating boxes. My most recent work has been exploring Pennsylvania Dutch hexology symbols, which is why I selected the PA painted slid lid candle box from 1777. My piece, "Captured", reflects the candle box both in its "aged" look and in the hexology symbols from the PA Dutch tradition. Mr. Barnes related these PA painted antique pieces with what was then cutting edge modern art. What I wanted to do was to take it a step further and blend the antique form with the modern aesthetic within one piece. While still adhering to the Barnes ideal of symmetry through placement, line, space, and color. There are other references to the Barnes collection in this piece too such as the tryptic format and gold leaf used in religious iconography. As well as the idea of boxes being viewed as a less high art form much like the way Cezanne's work was viewed when he was creating it. I think I "Captured" it in this box. Like the "letsconnect" project the title of my piece is the jumping off point. Allowing the viewer a foot hold with which to start and using their unique experiences be able to explore my art and determine what it could say for them.

I am a retired US Navy Submarine Nuclear Operator, currently working as a Nuclear Senior Emergency Preparedness Specialist for Exelon Nuclear Corporation. While in the Navy I earned my AA degree in fine arts from the State University of New York (SUNY). I continued my studies at Connecticut College taking independent studies courses in their print making department between my Navy deployments. My work has been selected for many juried shows and is in the permanent collection of SUNY,the Holy Roman Catholic Church, as well as private collections across the country. I am currently an active member of the Philadelphia Dumpster Divers.

Website

Unidentified maker. Candle Box. 01.09.40


Daniel L. Perconte. "Spring". #1062
Daniel L. Perconte
The picture I have submitted is called "Spring". A watercolor on paper.It was completed in April 2018.It was inspired by Paul Klee's "Village among the Rocks".Paul Klee is one of my favorite artists.I often use The Klee to help me finish-up a composition.I like most of the Bauhaus artists.Paul Klee uses Ink and Gouache together.I also use these two together,to build a picture;and work with mixed media.Here, I just use Watercolor.Shapes and forms, to build my picture.Putting warm colors against cold colors brings an emotional change and touches the soul.Painting,printmaking and sculpture from the Bauhaus are always inspirational,to me.The Paul Klee is a good representation of Fine Art before the 2nd. World War.And is an important part of the Barnes Foundation Collection.That reflects the state the World was in before World War2.I think that the Klee reflects this world state,too.

I was born in Brooklyn,New York on Dec.13,1956.My education is almost all technical.Graduated from Brooklyn Technical High School,1975.Went to CUNY for my college education.Downstate Medical School and Kings County Hospital Center for Pathology program.Moved to Philadelphia from New York in 1986.I am a Clinical Microbiologist,Teacher and a Fine Artist.Living here in Philadelphia.I studied Fine Arts with a good painter.I was his assistant and helper.We worked together on several projects.And Library is the real resource.That I use daily to study and learn, Fine Art.


Paul Klee. Village Among Rocks (Ort in Felsen). BF2520


Sean Sexton. Hat Maker. #1134
Sean Sexton




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Paul Cézanne. The Card Players (Les Joueurs de cartes). BF564


Mikel Elam. Caryatid Afrique. #1125
Mikel Elam
I have visited the Barnes perhaps 25 times in my life starting as a young boy. I thought I knew the rooms in a very intimate way. It was different this time because I needed to chose a piece which would translate in an eight by ten inch format. I decided to look for bold yet simplified images . There was more than enough to chose from. I kept coming back to one which would not have been my usual choice. It was Modigliani's Caryatid .Circa 1913-1914. I felt it was a departure from the style we have come to know as Modigliani. And yet somehow after close scrutiny one can see it really is just a variation of his oeuvre. I am a person of color. Sometimes I have felt art has mostly ignored us. In my personal work I have attempted to remind others of the multicultural world we reside in. To tell stories about the other side of midnight. Where all things visually abound in beauty ,intellect, passion and controversy also exist. It doesn't have to be a parallel universe. We live fairly close to each other. I decided to recreate Modigliani's Caryatid using darker skin tones and a different color balance. What struck me about his painting was the series of shapes within the composition. It's sculptural initiatives. The shear rawness in these forms evoke images of what Westerners refer to as tribal life. One of the greatest lessons I have learned about sophistication expressed in all mediums is the beauty of simplicity and the ability to evoke emotion within that plane. Finally I have to say I really appreciate Dr. Barnes's vision. It includes everyone.

I am primarily a painter born in Philadelphia . I moved to New York where I attended School of the Visual Arts. Upon graduation I found myself working as a freelancer in film and photography mostly as an art production staffer. From there my life greatly shifted. I became an assistant to jazz legend Miles Davis. I worked for him traveling the world helping him to meet his many and varying obligations. We painted together which lead me to some interesting new growth. Gallery opportunities developed in both New York and Los Angeles. After his passing I returned to Philadelphia where I happily live and work today. I have been fortunate to have been in some excellent exhibitions including lovely places like the Woodmere Museum.

Website

Amedeo Modigliani. Pink Nude - Caryatid. BF292


Daniel Tiago . Air on the oblique angle. #1015
Daniel Tiago
Cezannes' Toward Mont Sainte-Victoire concentrates, generalizes and envelopes his landscapes on a small canvas. I have responded to this piece by turning the envelope inside out with an unfolding of the oblique angles and by reversing the view, exploring the inherent geometry from within the forshortened hills and thrusting horizon. Cezanne invites us to sojourn with him into his native atmosphere with brushstrokes that transcend the formal concerns of illusionistic space. The result is a sincerity that directs us not only to what is seen, but also and more forcefully toward the seer. By adopting his proposed universal visual language that explores the questions of being as it explores the questions of painting, I have joined him in a playful game of abstraction like others I admire such as Demuth, Marin, and Dove. These great pioneers engage the viewer in transcending the presumptions of seeing. I have brought the viewer still closer to center with a rearranging of oblique triangles and curvelinear shadows that throw open the edges of my canvas. Cezanne is the quantum of painting in the Western world, so I answer with a kaliedoscope demonstrating that what is observed depends on the observer. Every elegant planar brushstroke I answer with a decomposing tetrahedron, by echoing the oblique angles I open into the adventure and delight that Cezanne gives me.

1989-1994: Moore College of Art and Design; The Young Artists' Workshop. 1994: Pennsylvania Governors' School for Excellence; Painting and Dance intensive, campus of Mercyhurst College, Erie, Pennsylvania. 1995-1999: SVA (School of Visual Arts), BFA. SVA Gallery Shows, figure drawing selection under Peter Heinemann. 1996-1999: Studio Artist with Preston Bailey Design and John Derian Studio, NYC. 2004: Big Idea Gallery, Jim Thorpe, Pa.; Solo Show. 2005: The Naked Chocolate Cafe, Phila., Pa.; works on paper, solo show. 2006: Dada Gallery, Phila.,Pa.; solo show. 2009: New Bern, NC Council on the Arts group show.


Paul Cézanne. Toward Mont Sainte-Victoire (Vers la Montagne Sainte-Victoire). BF300


Gregorio Racadio. Hemihypertrophy . #1060
Gregorio Racadio
I wanted to create a piece that paid homage to Matisse’s Blue Still Life. Being that I primarily work in portraiture, I pulled colors from that piece that fit my subject. I didn’t want to force myself to use the same palette, rather choose those colors or tones that spoke to me. What draws me in more than anything about this painting is Matisse’s color choices for shadows.

Gregorio Racadio is an artist who lives and works in the Germantown section of Philadelphia. Racadio is a painter who explores portraiture and naturalistic representation as a means to critique and pay homage to historical moments, deconstructing long-held mythologies and replacing them with the coarse appearance of daily existence.

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Henri Matisse. Blue Still Life (Nature morte bleue). BF185


Loren Dann. Milja. #1192
Loren Dann
I wanted to go big, huge, originally inspired by the “Three Sisters”, I found the measurements and set to work. Having recently traveled to Australia to see my sister, I thought I would create a new version of “Three Sisters”. My sister and my two children, my sister in a Chinese outfit she wore at the Friendship Gardern in Sydney. As I worked I read the guidelines, 8x10”, uh oh. So I thought I would print this piece on canvas. I changed my mind, at least seventy times. I painted and researched. Then I looked, in my own kitchen, my framed print of “The Postman”, hung as Barnes hung him at eye level. I love looking into his eyes and seeing smears of color. I can see the canvas underneath breathing through. It has inspired me for over 10 years in my kitchen. I painted my daughter, again many times, never feeling a sense of accomplishment only a continuous urge to paint. For you I send my most favorite piece, that touches upon those qualities that ispired me in “The Postman”. One of my favorite habits of both Van Gogh and Matisse is the use of prints, and wallpaper. Behind my painting I have included a feminist inspired damask. To mirror the wall behind “The Postman”.

Education      2000-Moore College of Art and Design      1999- Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Professional 2014-Present: Freelance Art and independent Art Education,   2014-Present: Working with Gilbert and Leona,  http://www.gilbertandleona.com/      Creating paintings on the fabric as unique and random as the bags      themselves. 2013-Present: Founder and teacher at ACC of Deptford (Academic      Cooperative Community)      http://articles.philly.com/2013-10-14/news/42995659_1_co-op-              ethics-lesson-home-school 2008-Present: Private art instructor. Offering lessons in painting,      drawing, portfolio presentation, as well as offering therapy for      children with disabilities, and the elderly.

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Vincent van Gogh. The Postman (Joseph-Étienne Roulin). BF37


Jacqueline Unanue. Two Women Surrounded by Birds. #1012
Jacqueline Unanue
Joan Miró is the Spanish artist with whom I have always felt a connection. During my numerous trips to Barcelona, I have visited the Miró Foundation many times, and had the opportunity to contemplate his magnificent work. This work transports me to my most primitive, original essence, and to my paternal ancestors roots, as well. For this reason, when The Barnes Foundation called upon the artists to participate in this inspirational project, this work titled: Two Women Surrounded by Birds, immediately came to mind. In some ways, this particular piece matches with my own abstract style. Inspired by its language of abstract forms- even when the human figure is depicted as birds- and the primary colors so characteristic of his work, I began to create my art for this exhibition. The most powerful moment of my creation was to paint the strong black color forms the end up creating a body not only of the physical, but also of the soul.

Jacqueline Unanue is a Chilean American artist of Spanish ancestry living and working in Philadelphia PA since 2000. Unanue studied design at the Universidad de Chile de Valparaíso. While a student, she became interested in the rock art found in her native country. She traveled extensively through Chile’s Atacama Desert, doing on-site rock art research. She also traveled to Spain to study the pre-historic paintings of the Altamira caves in the Basque Country, which being the home of her paternal ancestors. In addition to numerous individual and group exhibitions in Chile since 1983, Unanue has exhibited internationally.

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Joan Miró. Two Women Surrounded by Birds. BF967


Natessa Amin. Pointing . #1095
Natessa Amin
My work approaches pure abstraction based in ornament, pattern, and color. I’m interested in what materials can do and how tactility functions. Hybrid forms manifest ideas ranging from post colonial histories, personal narrative, and the mystical languages of abstract tantra painting. I was born and raised in Pennsylvania in an Indian-American family. I grew up navigating the complex relationships that were formed through the combination of contrasting cultures and religions. My work is a reflection on this unique American experience and confronts the hybrid nature of identity through the layering of image and processes while addressing our human desire to share experience. Through installation I aim to create worlds of tactile immediacy, designed for multimedia to exist together, dismantling hierarchy in the hope of forming new connections. The tangible and lived experience referenced in my work embraces an inherent truthfulness at a time when it is often difficult to tell what is real or fake.

Natessa Amin (born, 1987) is a visual artist based in Philadelphia. Amin earned her BFA in Painting from Boston University (2010) and MFA from the University of Pennsylvania (2015). She is a co-­‐founder of the artist-­‐run space FJORD, located in Philadelphia and is currently the Visiting Studio Artist at Moravian College in Bethlehem, PA. Amin has exhibited her work most recently in a solo exhibition at the Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College, and prior to that at Hangar H18 Gallery, Brussels, Trestle Gallery, Brooklyn, and at the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Woodmere Art Museum, Gallery 128 at PAFA, Tiger Strikes Asteroid, and Ice Box Project Space in Philadelphia. Natessa has completed residencies at the Fabric Workshop and Museum (2

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Paul Klee. Place-Signs (Ort-Zeichen). BF1004


Lara Cantu-Hertzler. The Ascetic after Picasso. #1008
Lara Cantu-Hertzler
I chose to make a painting reacting to Picasso’s painting ‘The Ascetic’ because I’m struck by the twisted beauty of the old man seated at an empty plate; he seems to be so thin that his face is being squeezed by reality. In my painting I try to capture Picasso’s contrast between space and flatness. My painting began with a sketch that I drew at the Barnes. When I got back to my studio I painted onto my sketch with watercolor, then pressed the painted drawing onto a sheet of 300 pound paper to get an image that was the reverse of the original. I then painted onto the reverse image and pressed it onto another piece of 300 pound paper. I worked on both impressions simultaneously using watercolor, gouache, acrylic and silver paint marker, often pressing them together to create two layered mono prints. This painting is the second piece of 300 pound paper. I attempted to include a loose impression of the gold frame around the border to reference the fact that I’m painting from a framed painting.

Lara Cantu-Hertzler is a Philadelphia painter who is inspired by architecture and the figure. She explores themes of urban decay and feminine identity. Lara’s influences include: classical art, music, dance, photography, abstract expressionism and impressionism. In 2008 Lara graduated from Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts graduating with a Certificate in painting. In 2014 Lara received a full fellowship to Vermont Studio Center. Lara’s had solo shows at: Allens Lane Art Center, Abington Art Center, and High Wire Gallery. She’s also exhibited her work at Rittenhouse Square, Chestnut Hill Fall for the Arts and Rosenfeild Gallery. Lara has won numerous awards from The Philadelphia Sketch club, and The Philadelphia National Arts Pr

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Pablo Picasso. The Ascetic (L' Ascète). BF115


Magda San Millan. Child with Face Paint. #1132
Magda San Millan
I make live performance that romances many genres: dance, theater, stand-up comedy, and lecture/demonstration. I work collaboratively and in rigorous isolation. Themes that come up again and again for me are: shame, death, grief, wildness, subversion, childhood and sass. I am currently working on a solo show that is inspired by the years I worked as the artist-in-residence at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Magda San Millan creates original dance/theater performance. She received a B.A. in Dance from Bard College and came to Philadelphia to study at the Headlong Performance Institute. Her work has been presented by FringeArts in Philadelphia, DanceNOW Joe's Pub in New York City, and JACK in Brooklyn. Magda has completed several Artist-in-Residence appointments, including: visual art in oncology at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the creation of a Playworker position for the SMITH Memorial Playhouse, and as an artist for the A20 Mural Arts Program. She currently teaches at the P.L.A.Y School at Bok.


Chaim Soutine. Young Girl in Red Blouse (La Petite fille en rouge). BF952


Devin Cohen. Buoyancy. #1305
Devin Cohen
As I gaze spectate view perceive into Paul Cézanne's painting, Group of Bathers (Groupe de baigneurs, 1892–1894), I begin to introspect/outrospect as if from within the piece and within the feelings of cleansing and bouyancy as if from one person's eye and another person's eye as seen ethereally omniscient yet humanistically plural. My oil painting with tid bits of graphite hintings is entitled Buoyancy (2018), and is a squinting as well as closing of eye/i/I in the moments during and seconds after what is seen as well as what is implied by Cézanne's Bathers. Buoyancy is a submerged ecstatic feeling; a shedding of skin and follicle. Buoyancy also considers Barne's take on 'form' whilst simultaneously including a notion exemplified by Rumi that "If you look too closely at the form, you miss the essence." Buoyancy is an experiential painting slightly withdrawn from itself in its surrender in the out-of-body-ness of full engagement and connection that occurs when physicality is fully felt; in this case as abstracted/extracted from this particular sharing of refreshing air felt upon skin and submerged in the wholly/holy waters of nature along side fellow spirits encased in flesh ; as the concepts, objects, and distinctions such as self and other dissolve, cleanse, yet simultaneously solidify and conjure unconditional inclusivity and joyous love beyond the boxing of the preconceiveds of such notions of the materialities of manifested instances geometrically disintegrating loops of ripple into shapes and form.

Devin Asher Cohen aka Alien Architect (Philadelphia, 1985) is a interdisciplinary experimental abstract artist working with music, visual arts, vocals, and poetry. In recent years he has been working on bridging gaps between Mexico, the U.S., and the world by founding and directing an experimental gallery named Liliput in Puebla, Mexico. Devin graduated from Temple University. In 2014 he published his experimental trip hop poetry album, Arteria. In 2016 he published his book of Poetry, All Praises. From 2015-17, he received the Hungarian Artist Residency grant. ​ Devin Cohen has exhibited and performed around the world. His work is in private collections in Paris, London, Hungary, Mexico, California, New York, and Philadelphia.

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Paul Cézanne. Group of Bathers (Groupe de baigneurs). BF101


Maryann Held. Chalfont. #1025
Maryann Held
This is a response to Karl Priebe's bizarrely beautiful painting, Miss Chalfont. I was immediately struck by this odd little piece. There are elements of the surreal: the out of place sequined hat placed jauntily on her head, the mysterious band clasped delicately between her fingers, the two starlings perched beside her, and the strange, somewhat foreboding mountains jutting up from the landscape far in the distance. I chose to re-imagine Miss Chalfont in my own illustrative style, amplifying her beautiful skin with its subtle blue undertones, her precisely posed hands, and her bemused expression—echoing the entrancement I felt when looking on Priebe’s work. Many of the pieces in the Barnes collection are examples of outsider or folk art, an aesthetic that Miss Chalfont certainly embodies. My response reflects my own interest in folk art motifs and design. In place of the barren olive-green plain, Chalfont is now surrounded by a vibrant, yet dark, swirl of leaves and flowers. It is a melding of the surreal and the traditional. Gazing back at you, Chalfont is prompting you to ask: what exactly is going one here?

Maryann Held is a Philadelphia-area based children's book illustrator who has been working professionally for over ten years. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Maryann attended the University of the Arts. After living in Brooklyn, NY for several years, Maryann returned to Philly to work full time as sole in-house assistant illustrator for the Berenstain Bears. Maryann now works full time as a freelance illustrator, where she pursues her passion for classic children's illustration.

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Karl Priebe. Miss Chalfont. BF1144


Lisa Domenic. Sleep in Heavenly Peace. #1114
Lisa Domenic
This Barnes Collection Last Supper scene portrays John the Apostle as a child resting in his savior’s lap while the other adult disciples are learning the fate of their beloved teacher and in serious rabbinical discussion. I felt the picture spoke to the way we approach the divine represented by the Christ then having an affect on what we receive in return. Many ancient words and Holy Scriptures tell us timeless truths and while studying this artwork and reacting likewise artistically my thoughts included seeing the following: we are all God’s children, as a father figure he keeps us safe and secure, when we approach this idea as a child we find rest and he promises to give us peace when we accept him. The disciples are concerned and still want answers at the table but John is satisfied. Just knowing Jesus is there and believing him Sovereign, is enough for him and he is able to sleep in the heavenly peace - sung about and searched for throughout the ages by all people. I imagined an ethereal space-scape to place the likeness of the young follower painted in gilded oil by an unknown German master to illustrate the hope and comfort I felt in response.



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Central German Master. Last Supper. BF851


Moira Connelly. Fuschine sky. #1195
Moira Connelly
Horace Pippin's "Christ and Woman of Samaria" is one of the first paintings I recall when I recollect my visits to the Barnes Collection. It's located in one of the last galleries I typically visit and it always strikes me as feeling like an anomaly. The strong magenta of the sky dislocates me, and a visit that had felt like time travel to a bygone era suddenly collides head on with the present. The color of Horace Pippin's painting is something to reckon with and feels spiritual, ecstatic, and psychedelic. I'm very interested in Pippin's painting for it's particular and striking use of color. The color feels like today and brings an artwork made almost 80 years ago to the present. Was that a Pennsylvania sunset that Pippin painted? Is it possible to date a sunset? More broadly I'm interested in the experiential moments that occur during a visit to the Barnes where time distorts and Barnes’ Collection becomes wholly and presciently present. Because of the unique hanging, one can truly time travel during a visit to the Collection. The experiential linearity of art historical record is contorted and we are able to experience the artworks on individual and interrelated terms. This historical dislocation opens artworks up to the present in new ways that are often surprising. Works like Pippin’s feel incredibly contemporary and the particularities of Barnes’ installation allows one to experience it as such.

Moira Connelly is an artist currently living and working in Philadelphia. Her work has been shown at Pablo’s Birthday, Shea Stadium, A Gathering of Tribes, and September Gallery in New York, Second Bedroom Gallery in Houston, Golden Age in Chicago, and Fjord Gallery, Icebox Projects, Space 1026, The Woodmere Museum of Art, and Delaware County Community College in the Philadelphia area. She currently co-runs a project space called Day Space, committed to showing the work of artists in the area working without gallery representation and located in the yard behind her home in the Port Richmond neighborhood of Philadelphia. Connelly received a BA from Sarah Lawrence College and an MFA from Tyler School of Art.

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Horace Pippin. Christ and the Woman of Samaria. BF986


Gustav Gscheidle . Random thoughts on Vincent van Gogh’s “The Factory”: BF303. #1066
Gustav Gscheidle
"Random thoughts on Vincent van Gogh’s “The Factory”: BF303" explores feelings of nostalgia, heritage, working class roots, and struggles with depression.

Artist, and Designer, Gustav Gscheidle, explores forms of visual communication in the public sphere. Gscheidle has always been intrigued by images from a very young age, weather it was the dot patterns and the way ink overlapped in the comic books he read as a child, the details and shapes in photographs that no one else seemed to notice, or the way reflections reacted differently on many surfaces. It has always been about image, color, shape, and spatial relationships. He has a strong affinity with the artists Marcel Duchamp, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns and many other Dada and Pop Artists. This connection is evident in the use of typography, photography, traditional drawing, discarded newspapers, advertising flyers and found objects.

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Vincent van Gogh. The Factory. BF303


Sonny Mendez. Resting women near blue and purple. #1211
Sonny Mendez
I wanted to follow Renoir's style of using bright hues of greens and yellows in his landscapes. I naively attempted to keep a deliberate structure with my color schemes across the work, which I did by using many different throw-away palettes for each different object and section in the painting. By placing the landscape in contrast with the dull peach and pink values of the resting nudes , I was taking my cue from Renoir's work the 'Standing Bather', where the body of the bather, especially her color, stands sharply away from the surrounding nature. In my painting, I added a heavier surrealist component in the distant background, with the dark sky and landscape, to playfully contradict and even mock the relaxed mood of the nearby circumstances of the resting women.

Sonny Mendez was born in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, and has a Masters degree in the philosophy of science from the London School of Economics. He lives in center city Philadelphia (very close to the Barnes) with his girlfriend, who comes from France. He first started painting several years ago when working as a teacher in Madrid, Spain, and continues to paint in his spare time. His favorite artist is Dali. He works at Morgan Stanley as a Wealth Management Associate.


Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Standing Bather (Baigneuse debout). BF965


Allen West. It took a structure to keep them. #1273
Allen West
The original work, "It Took Four of Us to Keep 'Em Apart" by William James Glackens, illustrates a moment of pause in a bar fight. The title likely takes the perspective of the police officer in the scene. The new work, inspired by that of Glackens, shifts the perspective to several, further removed observers, analyzing the scene and representing it as a diagrammatic map. The three hypothetical observers are looking at aesthetics, physics, and cultural paradigm. The diagram is the result of the three observers working together to create a unified map of the event. The needle-punched, felt illustration dissolves the separation of page and mark. The additive technique is a fuzzy, noisy surface. It has a coziness in opposition to the coldness of the image. What's presented can be both illuminating and deeply obscure. This invites the viewer to consider how we read an event historically or in the moment. The creation of the work is a thinking exercise, and so is the reception.

Allen West was born in New York State and studied psychology before moving to Portland Maine for undergraduate studies. He received a BFA from the Maine College of Art (2010) and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2017). Currently living in Philadelphia, he works as a studio assistant at the Fabric Workshop and Museum as well as for several independent artists. His own work is primarily fiber based and often takes the form of felt books and woven tapestries.

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William James Glackens. It Took Four of Us to Keep 'Em Apart. BF2020


Deborah Gross-Zuchman. Remembering Cezanne. #1109
Deborah Gross-Zuchman
I have always thought that Paul Cezanne's still lifes are incredibly beautiful. When I saw "The Large Pear" at the Barnes, I was inspired to create a beautiful still life myself in collage. I use my own painted papers and cut them up and assemble them to make the image I want. I believe the work I am submitting shows the inspiration I had while using my own creativity.

Deborah Gross-Zuchman, a Philadelphia painter, was an Art Demonstration Teacher and taught in the Philadelphia Public Schools for thirty-five years. She also worked as a Project Manager for the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program for several years. Gross-Zuchman uses the technique of collage as painting with paper, cutting up her hand-painted papers creating interesting and surprising effects. A book of her poems and paintings, Windows Into War (A Mother’s Lament), is published by Abingdon Square Publishers, NY Seder for the 21st Century, a Passover Haggadah, has an emphasis on social justice and freedom and is illustrated with her collages. Becky’s Braids , written by Susan Weiss, is illustrated by Deborah in collage.

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Paul Cézanne. The Large Pear (La Grosse poire). BF190


Elena Drozdova . Annunciation . #1153
Elena Drozdova
Thanks to a charitable American doctor and the turn of history, our first excursion behind the Iron Curtain became our last. I received successful infertility treatment, USSR collapsed and my husband, our three children and I became American citizens. The theme of miraculous conception speaks directly to my heart. To rephrase the ancient myth, I converted the scale of figures of original composition and their colors and alinement. The dynamic of gazes, Mary’s towards the Holy Dove, the Holy Dove’s towards Gabriel’s reclining figure, and Gabriel’s towards Mary, gives composition a spin. As the three-parted space turns clockwise, Gabriel’s message of Logos becoming flesh by birth through virgin’s womb starts pointing to a possibility for a woman to conceive other inspirations of the world, anything that Logos can pronounce through her mind, body, and spirit. Stylistically, I wanted a miniature painting to look monumental. I subordinated details to the larger corresponding shapes and used distinctively different styles of painting for each. This was my reference to the range of styles represented by the major innovative artists found in Barnes collection.

Born in Moscow, Russia; studied architecture at Moscow Architectural Institute, worked in historic restoration. Immigrated to US in 1989. Worked in stained glass as a painter for seven years and as Artist in Education for PCA. In 2006 started practice fine art. Same year started working in direct care for people with intellectual disabilities. In ten years of working at Peaceful Living, developed pARTners, a visual art program based on agency’s Day Programs and became an Art Director of the program. Currently, work as Art Director at Peaceful Living and practice fine art painting at my studio on Strahle St, participate in art shows in Philadelphia, teach community classes and do art residences in Philadelphia schools.

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El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos). Annunciation. BF117


Laynie X. What If. #1161
Laynie X
To me, Rosseau's piece depicts a woman dressed in clothing that reflects the societal norm, in nature alone. On a daily basis, women are expected to behave and feel a certain way at all times. That emotion or action does not always reflect how she currently feels at that time. Emotions might be suppressed or altered due to her profession, role as a mother, wife or friend. I believe being present in nature is that time where stress can subside or be put on hold and a woman can be her natural self. In present day Philadelphia, there are so many females that are stressed with day-to-day life that they don't see a way out. They are so far removed that they don't take much time for themselves, including enjoy nature. My picture shows a young women looking at a butterfly on a dandelion. This picture depicts a woman taking time of her complicated day to look at something in awe that is so simplistic. This picture is a representation of busy woman realizing hope; a brighter side of things despite the current situation.

Laynie X is a Philadelphia-based visual artist that specializes in portraits. Her medium of choice is graphite and coloured pencil. Laynie chooses to draw portraits of mainly women in an effort depict their everyday moods and emotions. She enjoys drawing women who display emotions/actions of strength and resiliency, because of female’s emotional nature. Women are emotional beings who often perform daily duties with a smile or with confidence despite the multitude of obstacles they may face in the dark. Laynie’s goal is to use what she has learned from social work as well as her personal experiences to lift up and inspire others through art.

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Henri Rousseau. Woman Walking in an Exotic Forest (Femme se promenant dans une forêt exotique). BF388


Laura Lyn Stern. Vibrant Forest. #1121
Laura Lyn Stern
The vibrant energy and tonal richness of surface attracted me to Chaim Soutine's paintings many years ago when I first studied them at the Barnes Foundation. I selected his landscape "Group of Trees" as inspiration for my bas relief cast glass piece. Important to my work is a sense of movement and place,undeniable tactile lushness and full responsive color nuances. The beauty of the materials used...the transparent nature of the glass,the textural movement of the surface and the reflective qualities of the gold leaf add a physical dimension,a deeper understanding and a new interpretation of the "landscape" theme.

Laura Lyn Stern is a Philadelphia-based educator and mosaic artist. Her artwork utilizes high bas-relief, unconventional materials, and skillful design approaches. Laura Lyn works with both project installation and object-oriented pieces. She has designed collections for Metaphor Bronze Tile and Wilton Armetale in addition to showing her work in numerous exhibitions and galleries.

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Chaim Soutine. Group of Trees (Groupe d'arbres). BF331


Lily Meier. Friday. #1290
Lily Meier
At the Barnes Museum, the art speaks for itself. The walls are devoid of titles and dates, and visitors are challenged to create their own narratives. This lack of explanation remains one of the most intriguing (and liberating!) aspects of Mr. Barnes's collection. I was initially drawn to “Piano Movers Holiday” because of its unique architectural composition. The image captures the industrial landscape transformed through the lens of a worker on a rare day off. A break from the daily grind is an opportunity to appreciate our familiar surroundings from a renewed, optimistic perspective. Light and lines reflect off of the playful collection of intersecting buildings, and even the sky seems energized. Featuring vintage Philly imagery, "Friday" pays homage to the nostalgic weekend vibes through a whimsical collage that captures the spirit of TGIF.

Lily Meier is an architect and artist living in South Philly. Her projects exist at the boundary between art and architecture, and collage is her primary medium for exploring the balance of logic and intuition in design. Lily has created work for Mural Arts, Design Philadelphia, and Next Stop Democracy (Knight Cities Challenge), among others. She engages with Philadelphia's vibrant art and design communities through projects of all scales.

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Charles Demuth. Piano Mover's Holiday. BF339


T.R. Risk. "Do Not Disturb". #1045
T.R. Risk
I thought of a visitor sitting in the room, in silence, and taking in all of the energy from the collective works. The floor, the ceiling, the iron, the painting; the room itself. All of it embodies a feeling of "Do not Disturb." -T.R.Risk

Timothy (TR) Charles-Richard Risk is a Pennsylvania-born artist and "creator-of-sorts" as he will often refer to himself when asked. Risk paints ethereal landscapes and flowers that evoke a bygone era. His paintings lead the viewer into a tranquil world of color, texture, and emotion. His subdued color palette and textural technique is serene and calm, yet his strokes quick and vibrant. "I am often overcome by the anticipation of creating. Painting is exhilarating to me. It is so emotionally fulfilling to finish a piece and upon taking a step back, seeing all that went into it- blood, sweat, tears, music." Risk's paintings and creations tell a personal story that is both heartbreaking beautiful and thought-provoking.

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A. G. Moreau. Lock. 01.03.08


Monna Morton. Baka Dancers Rest. #1046
Monna Morton
This painting is my interpretation to Degas' dancers. When I saw the painting and the african sculptures in the collection, I saw dancers from the Baka tribes in the congo who wear raffia skirts for their traditional dance. I wanted to include masks in the painting that represent the painted faces often seen in photos of these indigenous people.

WORK: • Designed and installed an 8’X15’ mosaic tile mural at the Overbrook Art & Environment Center • Developed and teach a Saturday Art Program for children, curriculum includes painting, drawing, textile design and printing, puppetry, sculpture, mosaic design, and creating art from found objects • Part of a team of artists selected to paint parking meters as part of a beautification project in Philadelphia PA • Designed flags for Philadelphia Unity Cup Games ( a total of 13 countries ) EXHIBITS: • The Colored Girls Museum: Art Installation • The African American Museum, I Found God in Myself (group exhibit with artists from the Colored Girls Museum) • Skylight Gallery, Brooklyn NY • Dupree Galleries, Society Hill, Phila.


Edgar Degas. Group of Dancers (Groupe de danseuses). BF121


Robert pieri. Adaptive. #1216
Robert pieri
What I took a picture of is still a work in progress. I had been drawing with pastel on a piece of heavy paper and wasn’t sure what to do with it. I found out about the exhibition only recently and decided to use a piece of what I had plus paint over it.

I took honors art in high school and also wrestled. I started painting homes with a friend right after graduation. I have painted homes all over the area and I’m using my brush to make art for this project. I always doodled all over any paper work, using nice curved lines to cover the paper symetrically.


Angelo Pinto. Bathtub and Cat. BF723


Steven Mogck. Eye of the Beholder. #1018
Steven Mogck
Steven Mogck Artist Statement My mixed media works combine my training in illustration as well as infused elements of art history. After attending Pratt Institute and working in the field of illustration I started to feel unfulfilled in the direction of my art. I began to research the history of art and see that artists I admired such as de Kooning, Kline and Warhol also started out in the commercial field. This gave me the motivation and confidence to move on and challenge myself without totally abandoning my roots. I now combine my previous training with elements of collage and mixed media. Through using found materials and working in an unorthodox manner I have taken a more organic and socially engaged outlook. I look forward to the journey ahead and will continue to evolve in future art endeavors with hopes of socially engaging others along the way.

Steven Mogck’s work has been featured in numerous publications such as Marvel Comics and Time Out NY magazine. Steven also worked as a storyboard artist for movies and television commercials while living in New York City. Over the last ten years he has been focusing his attention on fine art. Steven has been featured in nationally juried group shows as well as Philadelphia area art galleries. Most notably The James Oliver Gallery. His paintings have been selected by curators from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Guggenheim Museum of Art and The Gladstone Gallery in New York City. Steven studied Illustration at Pratt Institute and graduated from West Chester University with a BFA in Studio Arts. Steven is currently enrolled at Moore College o

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Chaim Soutine. The Pastry Chef (Baker Boy) (Le Pâtissier). BF442


Annabelle Buck. Michele . #1219
Annabelle Buck
As a portrait painter, I am always drawn to portraits at museums. “The Ascetic” by Picasso is a particularly engrossing portrait to me because even though it is simple in terms of the amount of detail in the work, there is an indescribably haunting nature to it. I have always felt that the elderly are not represented in art enough. Lately I had decided that I wanted to do a portrait of my friend Michele Haines, who is a French chef and world traveler. I was visually inspired by Picasso’s piece, but the spirit of my friend is far from that of the gaunt old man’s. Picasso’s piece is a portrait of a man who has denied himself in the name of God, and my piece is a portrait of a woman who has lived life to the fullest.

Annabelle Buck is a painter living in Philadelphia, PA. Her works tell intimate stories of modern life, revealing a timelessness to her subjects. She works in both acrylic and watercolor.

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Pablo Picasso. The Ascetic (L' Ascète). BF115


Nasrin Abdosheykhi. Nelson Mandela. #1017
Nasrin Abdosheykhi
Inspired from African masks, when I saw that mask(dean gler) I was reminded of the history of Africa which is very valuable in culture and primitive art that is very pure. I could imagine the face of Nelson Mandela in that mask, the president who fought to find equal rights and peace. I added the smile as a symbol of peace, painted shells for hair and African motive for his clothes which was his favorite. The middle line in his face is a symbol of discrimination between colors, but his character could distort that so the background color is flat and the same color. I also painted red color out of frame on the edges as a symbol of war and slavery. Out of frame because Mandela pushed it out. In this artwork I combined painting and sculpture on the wood. I choose my colors and materials used based on my subjects.

Nasrin Sheykhi, Was born in 1989 in Iran and live in Philadelphia by Artist Immigration visa which name is EB1a that's for extraordinary artists. Bachelor degree in Fine Art. i created my own art style about 8 years and won bout 40 international and national awards from art festivals of many countries like: Grand prize in Brazil, special prize in Romany, the best award in international festival in China, special prize in Colombia and another countries like Austria, Belgium and Iran. Jury member for an international visual art of Iran. published my own book that name is; Paper Faces had some lecture in many university like SVA in NYC in 2017 more than 15 solo and group art show like Art Basel in Miami in 2017 and else.

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Unidentified artist. Mask (Dean Gle). A271


Jennifer Barrile. Girl with Cat. #1027
Jennifer Barrile
My inspiration from the Barnes collection is Paul Cezanne's painting, Girl with Birdcage. I was drawn to this painting partly because of the subject matter but also his use of color and light. Cezanne utilizes light and shadow to highlight the girl in painting where focus is on her with the pet. Most appealing about the painting, is his use of color blocking to frame the subjects, and the energy of the small strokes made with his brush. My overall vision for my art was to create an atmosphere within the painting to allow the viewer to engage with the subject matter. The subject of my inspiration is my daughter and our family pet. I utilized a limited color palette using acrylic paint, and I played with the energy of the shadows that surround the girl who is engaging in a peaceful activity. The colors I chose partly reflect Cezanne's painting but also help create a warmth in the artwork to parallel the relationship between the girl and cat. Overall I have achieved the look and feel I wanted in this painting utilizing the subject matter and color palette of Cezanne's painting of Girl with Birdcage.

A native Philadelphian, Jennifer Barrile is a freelance artist, illustrator working and living in the city. She is a graduate of Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia with a B.F.A. in illustration. Jennifer has a love for telling stories through her art, her favorite mediums to paint with is acrylic and watercolor. She is also inspired by nature, enjoys spending time hiking the Wissahickon trails, or walking in the neighborhood, sometimes with a sketchbook or paint brush in hand. Jen is currently participating in the 100 day project on Instagram, the act of creating something for 100 days. She is illustrating songs #100DaysOfSongsIllustrated incorporating storytelling, creative play while exploring mixed media.

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Paul Cézanne. Girl with Birdcage (Jeune fille à la volière). BF280


Hiero Maar. Mr. Janx The Spacecat. #1277
Hiero Maar
My painting draws from the composition of Paul Gauguin's Mr. Loulou 1890. Gauguin's painting made the figure look like it existed in a fantasy world where flowers are the size of people. My painting depicts a made up musical alter ego, Janx The Spacecat. Janx is a cat that lives in space and performs all the time, though he is only famous on Pluto. The internet has allowed for musicians to become famous in very small pockets of the globe, and that's the idea I play with with his character. In this painting he is just sitting around on a chair. The painting is done in acrylic.

Hi my name is Hiero Maar, I'm a 22 year old painter and clothing designer. My interests include long walks on the beach and red wine; also mosh pits and tequila, depends on the time of day.

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Paul Gauguin. Mr. Loulou (Louis Le Ray). BF589


Kate Madara . Diffusion. #1184
Kate Madara
Working with all forms created by nature her work is most informed by the internal conversations she has with herself exploring the intimate depths of human emotion. Alone these objects explore shape, luminosity and reference. When installed within a set of physical structures it becomes an experience of participation that seeks to confront individual experience through interactions with the space, objects and audience. Inviting others into her world allows both artist and viewer/participant member to reflect upon science, culture and art. Dancing along a spectrum of the small to the large, her work pushes boundaries from the inside by placing purity next to pain and allowing each individual to decide for themselves what it is for, on issues both existential and day to day. RESPONSE TO BARNES: I walked through these rooms and felt the oil in the paintings and the clay in the sculptures and the wood in the chairs like a tangible object of storytelling, the way our minds create stories in the silences between people which encompasses Presence. I was drawn into the dense gaze of a little girl and asked not what she was seeing or thinking; but instead gathered these flowers in the garden outside. Piece by piece I put together a poem I made from the bones of the Barnes about the human connection that can only happen when silently navigating the presence of others, or of art. The question we ask ourselves without being able to form an answer but in the poetry of our own living.

A child of the human experience, Kate Madara grew up just outside of Philadelphia within a family of a businessman, a librarian and a future doctor. From a young age she explored her quirky sense of perception with confidence and carried with her a large picture type of vision as she received her B.F.A in Photography from Arcadia University in 2010. An autodidact who loves to understand how things work and how to make things work she studies social, natural, holistic and biological sciences to poke holes through the edges of her own personal experience bubble. Her work dives deep into these spaces in ways that explore mindful processes both reflective and recursive; as well as, the contradictions of reality.

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Henri Matisse. Young Woman before an Aquarium (Jeune fille devant un aquarium). BF963


Michon Proctor. The Mysterious Intergalactic Space Bear. #1097
Michon Proctor
I chose The Mysterious Swan by Giorgio de Chirico. This piece grabbed my attention because of the Swan's bold colors and the zig zag pattern that covers most of the foreground. Upon researching the artist, I learned of his Metaphysical approach to art and his use of symbolism to provide the context for each piece. So for my piece I chose to interpret its symbolism in a similar but opposite approach. And in doing so it became a unique self portrait of my journey thus far. Chirico's artwork is rich in earth tones and to contrast that I used various shades of blue. For me Blue has always represented creativity and a sense of calm, which are emotions that I have experienced in my journey back to this city. My Bear takes the place of the swan and is defined by brighter colors. The Bear symbolizes strength and courage, whereas the Swan represents grace and beauty. In adding color to my bear I wanted to highlight its defining characteristics. Red for strength, purple for magic and pride, and green for ambition. The most important detail I wanted to reinterpret was the Zig Zag pattern. I chose spirals because it is one of the most ancient symbols in existence and often represents consciousness. The ladder positioned near the Swan is replaced by a brick wall. Whereas the ladder means progression, the brick wall means the unconscious mind. This design choice equals my feelings on my future. In an effort to step beyond the confines of this singular work I wanted to incorporate other elements found in Chirico's works. The archways, the use of light and shadow as well as the skyline often featured in the background of his works.

In my Senior Year at Moore College of Art and Design, I created a character for an assignment. I called it The Intergalactic Space Bear and upon graduating in 2014 I set out to develop the it further. I lived at home with my parents in Maryland for four years working a full-time job and working on my "Bears" in my spare time. I made several "Bears" out of recycled upholstery fabric and sold them at local craft fairs. I donated a few to local charities, which were auctioned off to raise money. I even won the Artist Category at the County Fair in my hometown. In January of 2018, I moved back to Philadelphia to push my "Bears" even further. So far I have been accepted to the Moore Alumni show. I hope to cross many mediums with my bears.

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Giorgio de Chirico. The Mysterious Swan. BF410


Jha'nyse Lundy-Reid (JEM). Meant to Stand Out. #1004
Jha'nyse Lundy-Reid (JEM)
Sophocles and Euripides by Giorgio De Chirico completely stands out in Room 6, it's current residence, in every way it can. The painting is the youngest one in the room (1925) besides a Matisse on the East wall (1921). It is painted by the only Italian painter in the room and is the only surrealist painting there as well. For these reasons, I first believed it to be in the "wrong" place. But as I followed the flow of the galleries, I realized that perhaps instead it was just intended to stand out! As you travel through the rooms in order, there are more and more paintings that carry its traits, and it's location in the room (Northwest corner near the doorway to room 7) could indicate it to be a transition piece to the next rooms. It wasn't meant to blend into the room, it was meant to stand out.

Jha'nyse Lundy-Reid (JEM) is a fine artist and designer based in Philadelphia, PA. Her work aims to showcase the narrative of the beautiful, although sometimes gritty, things she finds in the world and she does so using classical techniques she's learned throughout her (artistic) life as well as formally (Community College of Philadelphia).

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Giorgio de Chirico. Sophocles and Euripides. BF575


Diane Collins. Primal Madonna and Child. #1063
Diane Collins
The “Upper Rhenish painting of the “Madonna and Child” from the 15th century, with it's lush, idealized natural backdrop and rich, graduated blue sky felt luminous and dreamlike. Sitting with this version of the Madonna repeatedly I felt compelled to consider the boundary humans have drawn between nature and man through science and religion. The core of human struggle is undeniably bound to the instincts and needs we share with our animal cousins. Exploring animal as teacher, effigy, martyr and saint, I tease out the threads between my Christian and native origins as I explore where that which is sacred knits us together. Using the animal as subject, I seek a bridge between that which is primal and cultural in honor of our shared nature, both rugged and delicate in the hope of spanning the cavern of concept that attempts to divides us. "Animals may aid us in our everyday lives, in our dreams and meditations. Since they were created before humans, they are closer to the source and can act as allies, guides and familiars in our search for wholeness." - An Inuit Woman

EXHIBITIONS: Stanek Gallery, InLiquid, Philadelphia Flower Show, Cerulean Arts, Rosenfeld Gallery; “Art Alibi” Traveling Exhibit, Artists of the Redwoods, Mateel Gallery, Garberville, CA, Artist’s House Gallery, PAFA Faculty Exhibit, Wayne Art Center, Faculty Exhibit, Allen’s Lane Art Center, Main Line Art Center Faculty Show; Arnot Art Museum, Elmira, NY, J. Funk Fine Art Gallery; Toledo, OH, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art ASE, Philadelphia, PA 1996, Brandywine River Museum AWARDS AND HONORS: William Emlen Cresson Memorial Travel Scholarship, Ward Prize in Sculpture, Philadelphia Water Color Club, Pennsylvania Federation of Women’s Club Works in Private Collections in the northeastern US, CA and abroad. Awards: Cresson, Ward Prize

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Unidentified artist. Madonna and Child. BF852


Rebeca Martell. Gift of a common day . #1306
Rebeca Martell
Gift of a Common Day is a color photograph that belongs to a photographic series of objects that have become like ghosts in our lives by the weight of its own history. When I saw for the first time The Horse Cookie Cutter, on my first visit to the Barnes Foundation long ago, I could not stop thinking about how much resemblance it had with Gift of a Common Day. In the photo, the horse is fading away while the cookie cutter still present, like the gift of simple things. Gift of a Common Day is the image/ghost of an object which was loved once and The horse Cookie Cutter -an apparently ordinary use object- represents exactly to me the tittle of the photographic piece I am presenting: Gift of a Common Day.

Freelance photographer. ​Currently engaged in documenting urban cultures as she works as international correspondent for music and lifestyle magazines. She has been trained by renowned photographers like Anders Petersen, Antoine D Agata, Alex Webb to name a few, in Philadelphia Photo Arts, Centro de la Imagen, Museo Rufino Tamayo, Laboratorio Arte Alameda UNAM, Jumex Collection and PhotoEspaña. Her work has been exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Oaxaca, Philadelphia Photo Arts, XTeresa Arte Actual, as well as at the Embassy of Mexico in Spain, Hungary, Romania, United States, Belgium, Holland & France. In 2008 she won the Encuentro Estatal de Arte Contemporáneo in México, then got published Recuento, a catalog of her work.

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Unidentified maker. Cookie Cutter. 01.09.54


Kristin Leigh Koefoed. Many-Faced Goddess. #1120
Kristin Leigh Koefoed
The many faces of the Divine Feminine have been assigned different names by humans. We've constructed different characters to represent qualities of the Divine based on our sensibilities. We compartmentalize various aspects for the sake of human understanding. Yet the divine lover, divine mother, divine healer and divine destroyer are all one in the same. Divinity encompasses all. The forces connected to love, sexuality, and creativity work in conjunction with those connected to war, destruction, and death. All are part of Life. Inspired by the statue of an unidentified goddess listed as possibly Venus or Isis, I sought to represent the beauty and majesty of the Divine, permanent through the ages, overseeing the lives and deaths of humans.

Kristin Koefoed was born in Philadelphia and raised across the river in Southern New Jersey. Art brought her back to the City of Brotherly Love when she returned to pursue her BFA in Illustration. She has since been working as a freelance artist and graphic designer, presenting her personal illustrative art work in art shows and events.

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Unidentified Artist. Venus/Isis. A66


Adam K. Rosenthal. Fossil Fuel: Even-Toed Ungulate. #1278
Adam K. Rosenthal
Part One: I didn’t want to force it. Walking through the Barnes I’d hoped to connect with an artwork that related to my studio practice, but I was prepared to leave empty handed. Then I came upon Lipchitz’s "Gazelle". Seeing the graceful lines of this lithe bronze animal, I felt a spark. At first I thought the sculpture ancient, perhaps Roman. Learning that it was Modern, seeing how it’s timeless form allowed for a seamless placement among both the 20th century artworks and the artifacts of bygone millennia, only added fuel to the fire. Part Two: The incidental aesthetics of commercial plastics have long held my interest. Recently I’ve been working with used ink cartridges (there’s an orange bit that twists off prior to use which I find especially fascinating). I use them within drawings of animals, relating it's shape to the formal qualities of horns, beaks, claws, etc, while hoping that there is a conceptual line drawn between the fossil fuels used to create the plastics and the long-dead creatures from which they come*. When I recognized the potential to use "Gazelle" towards the same end it felt right. When I realized that the conflation of Lipchitz’s artwork with a commercial plastic, one produced for function but appreciated for form, reflected Dr. Barnes’ own style of curating Modern masterpieces with utilitarian objects, it felt perfect. *The earliest even-toed ungulate fossils are 53 million years old. These ancient mammals evolved into all present day animals who support their weight evenly between the third and fourth toes, including giraffes, pigs, camels, hippos, sheep and, of course, gazelles.

"Rosenthal creates emblematic figures on paper and walls, in colors dark and pale, hinting at complicated mythologies and shadow physicality…In [his] prints and drawings figures appear suspended in whiteness, like daydreams surrounded by light…He is a quiet colorist, a draftsman of elaborate if not baroque perfect edges." -Ernesto Pujol


Jacques Lipchitz. Gazelle. A244


Patricia Ingersoll. Pillars of Rock. #1002
Patricia Ingersoll
BALANCE Since childhood, drawing and painting has been a way to convey and reflect on the multilayered parts of my past. My environment has always impacted my work. Correlations between human struggles and natural complexities seem to create a bridge, an intuitive synergy in terms of form, composition, and color combinations. Images of place and memory are integral to making these connections. I am always balancing these for the most impact. Places inspire strong emotions and engagement with the process where I feel at one with my work.

As an artist, Ingersoll has been exhibiting her work in solo ands group exhibitions since 1980. She is the recipient of several Fellowships, including, most recently, a 2018 Fellowship and Residency at VA Center for the Creative Arts and a Fellowship at the Ballinglen Arts Foundation in Ballycastle, Ireland. She received an invitation to be an artist in residence at the American Academy in Rome. She is currently represented by the Cerulean Arts in Philadelphia and Artemis Gallery in Maine. Her work is in many collections.

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Charles Demuth. Piano Mover's Holiday. BF339


Mindy Flexer. Learning to Fly. #1006
Mindy Flexer
I’ve always loved Courbet’s “Woman With Pigeons.” It is such a calm, orderly symphony of opposites: warm lights and deep darks, subtle shifts and dramatic contrasts, stillness and movement, freedom and confinement. My painting starts with Courbet’s figure and birds, and then releases them into a joyful, ordered chaos that also makes a unity of opposing forces. Diagonals that create triangles within the rectangle hold in the movement of birds and figures. Lights and darks unify and divide. Each creature is separate and also bleeds into the others and the surround. There are nouns and spaces, but also paint that is simply paint. Everything is there but not there, still and in motion, entering and leaving the space of the painting. Impermanence rules over all of the comings and goings.

Mindy Flexer is a professional artist and art teacher who paints in response to the mystery of being another transient creature cherishing a passing moment. She holds a BFA from UArts and an MEd in Art from Tyler, and has studied at PAFA. She has exhibited at Woodmere, Fleisher, Artists’ House, national plein air festivals in PA and MD, and other venues. Flexer teaches art at her studio in Greene Street Artists Coop, the home of Mindy Flexer Art School. She is committed to being one of Germantown’s neighborhood artists, a landmark young artists can keep returning to as they grow up. She loves sharing her passion for art with people of all ages and walks of life, and believes in the power of art to transform people and communities.

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Gustave Courbet. Woman with Pigeons. BF824


Paul Castellana. Self Portrait. #1052
Paul Castellana




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Paul Klee. The Last Mercenary (Der letzte Landsknecht). BF2531


Jonathan D. Pinkett. Karee as Dutch Burgermeister. #1049
Jonathan D. Pinkett
My selection for The Barnes “Let’s Connect “ is Frans Hals. My attraction to Hals is focused on his barque style and because there are not that many “ Realistic “ portraits in the Barnes collection. As a golden age painter Hals was famous for his loose painterly brush work. I wouldn’t describe my brush work as loose, but I do consider it to be organic. The tronie I am submitting of my friend Karee is painted from life. I chose Karee as my model because I wanted my painting to reflect the image of an African American. And to pay homage to the frequent appearance of African images in Dutch Art and to stimulate some reflection about Dr.Barnes’ historical effort to uplift the dignity of African Americans.

Jonathan D. Pinkett Born 1949 Philadelphia Pa Studied Filmmaking at The Philadelphia College of Art Studied drawing and painting at the Grand Central Atelier. Mentors Colleen Barry and Jacob Collins My work is an effort to deconstruct the diverse world around me. I use a variety of materials and processes in each project that relate to specific themes or personalities. Because I absorb and re direct the energy of my subjects, the portraits that I paint are, in essence, self portraits. As an artist I seek to immerse myself in the conditions around me, not to escape them. My influences are Colleen Barry,Jacob Collins,and Romare Bearden Charles White, John Sargent, My works are in Public, Private and Corporate collections

Instagram: @gianipinkett

Frans Hals. Portrait of a Man Holding a Watch. BF262


Brian David Dennis. Spun Air Proposal. #1053
Brian David Dennis
I have always found this tiny watercolor evocative. The expression of trust and the promise of a rescue transfix me in a moment. Will it be when the story changes? The muscular physiques, tempered with grace ignite my desires and are an ideal I aspire to. With a few curved lines and exaggerated perspective I am tossed into a spinning gravity well. I am in the air. I experience the work so viseraly I could only respond with a self portrait. Installation Size: Slightly larger than life size Photographs, Lightweight Substrate, Paint

Brian was born in 1959, raised in a home with movable walls designed by his father, an aspiring artist. The fluidity of the modular arrangement captured Brian’s imagination. His mother, a kindergarten teacher encouraged Brian’s constant building. As a student Brian considered following his passion for stage design, but sought the more personal expression of fine arts. He studied at the Pennsylvania Academy and settled into mixed media. He later began to explore installation using the exhibition location as an essential part of the piece. A life long resident of Pennsylvania, Brian has been in Philadelphia since 1984 with his life partner Keith Breitfeller.

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Charles Demuth. Two Trapeze Performers in Red. BF644


Keith R. Breitfeller. Spring. #1054
Keith R. Breitfeller
I searched the collection for inspiration. At first I stumbled over my inability to relate to figurative works. As a non objective artist I needed to look beyond the representation. Once I did, I was able to connect to my passion, color and light. The wall behind the models is a perfect example. As a color fieldest I am fascinated by the techniques used to convey color. Seurat’s wall has a presence derived from the play between light and dark, as well as varying degrees of intensity. The solid surface is given life with tiny flecks of modulating colors. My entry, “Spring” hopes to capture the atmosphere so beautifully rendered in the Models.

Keith R. Breitfeller was born and raised in Catasauqua, a small town in eastern Pennsylvania, in 1952. He proceeded to attend Kutztown college, studied with New York Artist; Marion Pinto. He also studied at the Barnstone Studio. He now resides in Philadelphia, where his work was shown at Sande Webster Gallery and Vox Populi. He has exhibited at Finer Things Gallery in Tennessee, Adrian Falcon Gallery in Texas, Lyman Eyer in Massachusetts and Galerie Göttlicher in Austria. His work is included in many private and corporate collections in Athens, London, Dubai and throughout the Northeast. Keith has also become an avid tango dancer over the last 10 years.

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Georges Seurat. Models (Poseuses). BF811


Diane Pieri. A Carrot Becomes a Flower. #1021
Diane Pieri
Picasso said that it takes a lifetime to become young again. I find this to be true. So when looking at The Barnes collection, I found that I kept returning to the purity of little sketches by children, reverse paintings on glass, Pennsylvania Dutch sketches and furniture, all of which are exhibited among and alongside more weighted and important works of Modern Art. When I rested on Rousseau's small painting, The Rabbit's Meal, the innocence of being came to mind and I experienced a kind of visceral melting even though one of my lifelong gurus, Matisse, was so close in another room. In Room 23, Rousseau's painting is purposely placed to carry the red/orange from one side of the doorway to the other. The green lettuce leaf even connects with the huge Matisse seen through the doorway. My work is very decorative and I am after beauty in the world so I have chosen to use these impulses to play with this delightful painting hanging above a doorway, commanding attention, in a major collection of important art. Two carrots become 3 flowers. One rabbit multiplies into a decorative motif. Lettuce greens morph into flower shades.

Pieri has had 31 solo exhibitions,been awarded 2 Pollock-Krasner Grants,2 Independence Foundation Fellowships,a Pennsylvania Council on The Arts Grant,YADDO Fellowship,MacDowell Fellowship,included in Philadelphia Invitational Portfolio-Philagrafika. She was commissioned by The Association for Public Art- Manayunk Stoops-Heart and Home-9 seating elements along the Manayunk Canal Tow Path. She has completed 12 murals with Philadelphia's Mural Arts Program,7 independent murals in College Station,Texas. Pieri founded The Cooke Museum of Art at the Jay Cooke Elementary School in North Philadelphia. She has been a Teaching Artist at the Philadelphia Museum of Art for 21 years and also taught for The Barnes Foundation for 4 years.

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Henri Rousseau. The Rabbit's Meal (Le Repas du lapin). BF578


Philip Zuchman. Swiety Jacku Z Pierogami (Saint Hyacinth with a Pirogi). #1110
Philip Zuchman
“Swiety jacku z pierogami” (Saint Hyacinth with a pirogi) is a Polish expression that denotes a call for help when no help is possible-futility. Fortunately, artists are subject to two forms of community, the horizontal, our contemporaries, and the vertical community of minds, our predecessors. We can channel artists who are alive and ride for awhile. El Greco mannerized, distorted and exaggerated, to express deep feeling and anxiousness in uncertain times. I converted mediums, dimensions, and soutinized The virgin and child. What a trip!

Zuchman has been on his own since age 14. He studied at the Art Student’s League with Arthur Foster. The Salmagundi Club awarded him its Young Artist’s Scholarship from 1971-1975. He earned his Masters degree in Painting at Goddard College. Zuchman has served as vice president of Artists Equity, and vice president of the Philadelphia Watercolor Society. He is a Professor of Studio Art and Aesthetics Emeritus at the Art Institute of Philadelphia. His paintings have been exhibited with the U.S. State Department’s Art in Embassies Program and may be found in collections worldwide.

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El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos). Apparition of the Virgin and Child to Saint Hyacinth. BF876


Selene Nunez-Cruz/ TelenitART. Nowadays monsieur Loulou. #1228
Selene Nunez-Cruz/ TelenitART
My work is colorful and eclectic sometimes whimsical and abstract with not intentions to make it realistic but with intention to evolve and continue creating new perspectives of art. I like to combine fluidity of several media to create abstract textures in my artwork. I chose to paint monsieur Loulou (BF589) as a reflection of a nowadays child and the influence of media and technology. I wanted to deconstruct Gauguin ‘s masterpiece on the elements that, for me, reflects a fantasy-like forms and colors created by the imagination of the child. Purposely, I wanted to utilize the base green/Orange color palette utilize by Gauguin with my style to create texture in the painting. Some objects were purposely enhanced with bright light colors as used in my previous work. These forms and objects are a reflection of my eclectic style just with the purpose to invite the viewers to open non only their eye but sense of smell as my artwork is impregnated with scent for give an extra dimension to the painting. Always evolving and keeping an eclectic style to create projects with fluid colorful aesthetics.

Selene was born in Mexico City. Since early age her mother motivated her to be creative and to express herself by drawing. During her childhood she moved into an area surrounded by mountains and tropical landscapes and her love for nature grew tremendously. She completed a degree in biology and studied abroad a PhD in immunology. She lived in the Côte d’azur Almost 4 yrs. The Provence colors, people and images captivated her eye. She met and visit several French gallery and artists friends from the area. She then moved to USA to work as cancer scientist at the University of Pennsylvania. She considers a self-taught artist with an eclectic touch. Her science background and curiosity allow her to experiment with several media for her art.

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Paul Gauguin. Mr. Loulou (Louis Le Ray). BF589


marilyn rodriguez-(behrle). 'not so- Still GLAM lLife'. #1173
marilyn rodriguez-(behrle)
My art comes from my environment and my community and that where I take my inspiration. Much of my paintings and drawings manifest it through unconventional materials like paper bags and other found objects. The materials are often chosen to fit within the context of the subjects... My works references lost souls that walk amongst us and constants flux with their mental health illness, drug addictions, and social handicaps... My selected art piece is call ‘’Still life”, a very basic art style of painting for the time period created, c.1818. A time where art was appreciated for it elegances. The connection/response, for me is the artist who created it. Vincent Van Gogh an artist who battled many mental voices/demons. This work shows the way the brush strokes dictate the emotions he was feeling at that moment. I will bet he felt very trapped in his skin. The layout of the flower as it cries for help. But in a very quiet tone. The vase shows how the voice can be trap or confine into a still life. For the art work I have created, my reflected response, is a follow … I call my piece “not so- still ‘GLAM’ life. This is the everyday journey of an addict, should they or not take that next hit. My painting demonstrates how such a basic syringe could take an addict through their everyday brush strokes.

Marilyn Rodriguez-(Behrle) Artist biography I am abstract realist (mixed medium) Latina artist that reside in the heart of North Philadelphia, which is known as the badlands, (not a nice word) a negative, derogatory slang. I graduated from Moore College of Art and Design in 2008. My degree is in fine art and art education. A degree I am very proud off. It took me eight years to arrive at that moment, something I always share with my learners. More so, because I want my learners to know if you have obstacles, you never give up. You must follow your dreams. The beautiful blessings were that my daughter and myself were in school at the same time and the same college. 2016: Graduated with my Masters of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) in Community A

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Vincent van Gogh. Still Life (Nature morte). BF928


Jack Ramsdale. "plat aux oeufs". #1003
Jack Ramsdale
I am responding to Pierre-Auguste Renoir painting, Cup of Chocolate. The contemplation of the woman sitting have her cup of chocolate is about so much more than what is depicted. What is on her mind? What is she remembering? The sense that she is somewhere else and the cup of chocolate is a pause, a moment to mentally wander. In my photograph, "plat aux oeufs", I recognize a similar situation. The woman with a boiled egg on a plate, cut in half but eating is not what she is focused on. So much is going on around her, but she is still, somewhere else.

Jack Ramsdale Studied art at Cranbrook Academy of Art where he received a Masters in Fine Arts and also studied photography at Edinboro University. Some recent exhibitions where his work had been included. 2018 Cerulean Art Gallery Solo exhibition 2017 Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral Philadelphia, PA "In Passing" Solo exhibition 2017 Woodmere Art Museum- Woodmere Annual exhibition - Esther & Harvey Graitzer Memorial Prize 2014 "13 MEN" group invitational exhibition of men's self-portraits Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral Philadelphia, PA "Beyond the Paint" Photographs Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art


Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Cup of Chocolate (Femme prenant du chocolat). BF14


Dave Walsh . Trees and House. #1032
Dave Walsh
My work explores the relationship between nature and the built environment. Responding to House with Trees by Cezanne, I wanted to question where one object stopped, and another started. What is foreground, what is background? Challenging the interaction between figure and ground, Cezanne softens the relationship between the verticality of the trees and horizontality of the house with mark, tone and edge. In my painting, a similar compositional structure of verticals and horizontals is engulfed by the color and pervasiveness of the ground. Ecologically speaking, background spaces have become foreground actors that haunt us in an age of unquantifiable systems.

Dave Walsh is an artist who lives and works in Philadelphia. Walsh received his BFA from Tyler School of Art and his MFA from Yale School of Art. His paintings have been featured in the 2015 MFA annual edition of New American Paintings as an editor’s selection. Walsh was an artist-in-residence at the Dumfries House in East Ayrshire, Scotland and a 2015-16 fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts. In 2018, he was awarded the 2018 F. Lammot Belin Scholarship.

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Paul Cézanne. House and Trees (Maison et arbres). BF89


Gary Grissom. My New Coat (Portrait of Ava) . #1089
Gary Grissom
I’m an artist who since the late 1970’s have been making images of places, people and things I’ve seen. The majority of my art for the last two decades has been depictions from Philadelphia locations close to where I reside.

I studied painting and art history at Community College of Philadelphia, Philadelphia College of Art and University of Pennsylvania. In the 70s I was a founding member of Bricolage, a performing art collective and Wilma Theater. For twenty years I designed media for numerous theater and dance performances. My media design work lead to a growing interest in photography. During the 80s I started to exhibit photography. For the last 30 years I exhibited photography in Pennsylvania and nationally. I was fortunate to receive a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Visual Arts Fellowship.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Girl with a Jump Rope (Portrait of Delphine Legrand). BF137


Eric Goldberg. Barbara Jean Griffin. #1050
Eric Goldberg
Each time I visit The Barnes Collection, I find myself gravitating to the Vincent Van Gogh painting The Postman. Initially I thought it was the hypnotic stare of the subject that so strongly attracted me, but I now know it is more. Van Gogh has not simply painted an imitation of Joseph Roulin’s appearance; he has expressed the man’s character, his inner being. Van Gogh has depicted Joseph Roulin as a person of wisdom and integrity, a person of great strength of character who exudes both intelligence and warmth. I am a fortunate man. I too have a postal carrier who possesses the attributes that Van Gogh expressed in his portrait of Joseph Roulin. Barbara Jean Griffin has been delivering my mail since I moved to my present address in 2012. Her open, friendly disposition was apparent from our first meeting. In the years I have known her, she has proven to be a person of genuine warmth, intelligence, integrity and wisdom. Barbara Jean is one of the rare people whose beauty is both external and internal. It was an honor to have her sit for me.

Eric Goldberg was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut. He studied at Parsons School of Design, The New School for Social Research, New York University and New Mexico University. He taught painting, printmaking and drawing at colleges and universities for over thirty years. His home and studio are in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Goldberg’s prints and paintings have been extensively exhibited in the United States and abroad. His work is held by many private, corporate and public collections. Most recently a number of his works have been added to the collections of The National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, The Sakima Art Museum, Okinawa, Japan, Syracuse University and The Boston Athenaeum.

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Vincent van Gogh. The Postman (Joseph-Étienne Roulin). BF37


Gail Chapman. Redhead in a Black Slip. #1122
Gail Chapman


As an outsider artist, I work, for the most part, three dimensionally. Currently, my medium of choice is papier-mâché. I strive to use this somewhat pedestrian medium in a sophisticated way. My inspiration comes from the human form, creating figures that stand from 2 feet to 4 feet tall. Recently I have begun focusing on the bust form to explore the human face in greater detail. My work has been shown and sold, most recently, at the now retired Green and Green Gallery in Lambertville. I can be reached by text or email. 215-694-6879 or gchapman2253@comcast.net


Amedeo Modigliani. Redheaded Girl in Evening Dress (Jeune fille rousse en robe de soir). BF206


Lauren Rinaldi. Woman Leaving. #1031
Lauren Rinaldi
I chose Courbet's Woman with White Stockings as my point of departure for the piece I created because I've always been drawn to the artist's work and how he chose to depict real people and snapshots of moments in every day life. His work representing the female nude challenged the standards of the time, breaking away from the idealized and glorified unrealistic representations of women. In Woman with White Stockings, from the description on The Barnes' site, "a hint of narrative heightens the erotic effect. While the sexual act is not shown, it is implied. The nude looks seductively at a presence outside the frame-this is perhaps a moment post-copulation, as she sits awkwardly pulling on her clothes. The setting is strange, uncomfortable, as she leans near a precipice and rests her naked bottom next to a dirt path. This is not nature in harmony with the female body, a la Renoir, but rather nature used, hastily, as a place for sex." My painting builds on this visually, but my intention was to put the woman in more of a position of power. She is not immersed or in harmony with a bather-in-landscape setting, rather the landscape fades into the background and melts into an interior space as she stands and dresses confidently. Unlike Courbet's painting, her genitalia is not on display and the implied storyline isn't as direct, though the peek under her skirt and the act of dressing leaves the narrative up for potentially erotic interpretation. My painting aims to symbolically leave objectification in the past while acknowledging that impossible task, as women performing benign every day acts are always sexualized.

Lauren Rinaldi was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1983. She received her BFA in Painting from Tyler School of Art in 2006. She is represented by Paradigm Gallery + Studio in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and resides in Philadelphia with her husband and son.

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Gustave Courbet. Woman with White Stockings (La Femme aux bas blancs). BF810


Melissa Liegner. Dancers. #1147
Melissa Liegner
Referencing subject matter and composition, this piece draws inspiration from Henri Matisse's 'The Dance' Working with charcoal and conte, the artist uses light, shadow and linework to add depth and transform a scene of playful interaction in to one more intimate and emotionally charged.

Melissa Liegner is a figure painter whose focus is on the nude female form. Her works suggest ornately upholstered interiors where figures lay in repose or, more often, intertwine. Using distinctive pattern and unique decorative elements as anchor points amongst strokes of flesh and movement, Miss Liegner mixes elements of the pure with the profane. Melissa Liegner currently resides in Philadelphia, PA.

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Henri Matisse. The Dance. 2001.25.50a,b,c


Michael Stablein, Jr.. The Dance. #1081
Michael Stablein, Jr.
When we look at Matisse’s, ‘The Dance,’ in the main room of the Barnes Foundation galleries, we see eight nude women. We also see color, form, and a dialogue between bodies, aesthetics, and the architecture in which the painting is nested. If perhaps this must inevitably be the first thing we see, I want the second thing we see to be the men concealed behind the work: the man who gazed upon these women he painted, the man who received the painting, the men who built the institution that now houses it, the men who continue to gaze and remain unrendered. They wish not to be seen. They want certain actions and desires to remain concealed. It is said, “behind every great man is a great woman.” Visibility is a many-faceted thing. Here, the persistent concealment of men's desires, men’s actions, behind the nude female form, behind that dialogue between form, color, and architecture, it is a ruse of power. In what do we participate when we look at an image? When I make this photograph in dialogue with Matisse’s painting, I too, as a white man, participate in the manipulations and concealments of power; even as I aim to expose such power. By substituting men in a standard uniform, relieving the women of their pose, I am asking that we look directly at patriarchal power, using my authorship self-critically. If we look closely, these paintings might say more about men than about women.

I grew up queer and closeted in the deep south of Houston, Texas but by and large my life was pretty plain. I grew up around a lot of khaki pants and white button-down shirts. My friends, my teachers, my father wore it, or some version of the same. I ran around with straight white boys and we practiced this plainness. We swung bats, built forts, and found increasingly novel ways to hurt each other as a form of bonding, a more intimate understanding of our bodies and what they could do to other bodies. Yet, as we see all too often, this practice—these blameless games—mature into consequential structures in which real violence, both physical and psychological, can enjoy legitimate space. Boys will not be boys; boys will be men.

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Henri Matisse. The Dance. 2001.25.50a,b,c


Gema Valencia-Turco. Discovery Sampler. #1144
Gema Valencia-Turco
Dr. Barnes provides us with a unique perspective on hierarchy among examples of Fine Art, craftsmanship and design. With this in mind, I want to bring the audience’s attention to these - almost invisible - pieces in the collection: embroidered samplers. These may be overpowered by their proximity to master pieces, such as 'Reclining Nude' (Femme nue étendue sur un lit) by Vincent van Gogh, or obstructed by another artwork. However, these works are a supportive thread among the collection’s ensembles. Utilizing cross-stitch patterns, this book was modeled on a design originally conceived to be a learning tool for both literacy and cross-stitch for young women in the 19th Century. The piece integrates a stitched representation of Century Gothic typeface and Pennsylvania German folk elements.




Unidentified maker. Sampler. 01.13.27


Amir M. Lyles. Modern Woman With Cigarette. #1148
Amir M. Lyles
"Modern Woman With Cigarette" is responding to Pablo Picasso's "Woman With Cigarette" When I first responded to the call for artists, I knew I would probably select a Picasso work, but had no idea which one. Before I registered, I watched a documentary about Dr. Barnes. One of the first works he acquired was Picasso's "Woman With Cigarette". The narrator mentioned that the woman was a prostitute, and then during one of my visits to the Barnes Foundation, I overheard a docent saying "...we believe that she was probably a prostitute in a brothel." And then a woman who was in the group of attendees asked, "Why?" A question that resonated with me. I also wondered why that would be an automatic assumption. No one had seemed to offer any other explanation. I saw exactly what the title conveyed. No more or less. She could have as easily been a school teacher. Ironically, when I was looking for images of a woman with a cigarette, I came across the one that I used to inform this submission. It happens to be of an actress playing a prostitute. Interestingly, I already had an image of her that I am planning to work from, but she doesn't have a cigarette in that one. It is also worth mentioning that when I was growing up in Manhattan in the 1980's, there were hookers near my building in Harlem on Park Avenue and on 3rd Ave, and it was an entertaining activity to go with friends down to 42nd St and look at the ones there. Recently in pop culture there seems to be a growing interest in this type of image.

Amir M. Lyles was born on May 16, 1971 in Harlem, New York. An amazingly talented, primarily self-taught artist, Amir is extremely versatile in media, as well as subject matter. Past and present life experience, cultural history & legacy, as well as so-called classical works heavily influence Amir’s style. In addition to several group shows, he has had 2 solo shows in Austin, TX. Amir’s work is in at least two schools and numerous private collections locally, nationally, and internationally. Amir lives in NW Philadelphia with his three suns, twin daughters, and their mother. Together, they owned and operated S.O.N. A.R.T. Gallery and GiftShop in Mt. Airy from 2014-16.

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Pablo Picasso. Young Woman Holding a Cigarette (Jeune femme tenant une cigarette). BF318


Susan Breitsch. A Very Large Woman. #1100
Susan Breitsch
I make collages using borrowed art images. Often I feel like an artist/curator because of my rearranging of other people’s images. I find the images in books, galleries, museums, etc., bring them into Photoshop, and combine them and alter them. I print them on art paper, cut them out, and paste them down on museum board. Even though I usually start out in Photoshop it’s important to me that they are actual collages and not just flat photo collages. As a former sculptor I like the slightly textural aspect of collage. I usually alter them after they are pasted down; perhaps using colored pencil, paint, yarn, fabric, or sometimes found objects. This collage (A Very Large Woman) was initially inspired by the Modigliani painting with the Soutine landscape paintings to the left and right of it in Gallery. Most of the images in the collage come from the Barnes collection, and most have been altered from the original. This collage has paint and colored pencil added later. In A Very Large Woman, what appears to be Albert Barnes lusting over a young woman is meant instead to symbolize his lust for art—both large and small, masterful and modest.

Susan Breitsch EDUCATION Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture Maryland Institute, College of Art. M.F.A. Sculpture Cleveland Institute of Art. B.F.A. Sculpture GROUP EXHIBITIONS Outsider Art Fair 2018; Onward, Booth P5; NYC Imperfect Gallery; Dump Trump; Philadelphia, PA Nation V, Thru the Rabbit Hole; Sideshow Gallery, Brooklyn, NY Sideshow Nation III, Circle the Wagons; Sideshow Gallery, Brooklyn, NY Mic Check/Occupy; Sideshow Gallery, Brooklyn, NY It’s All Good/Apocalypse Now; Sideshow Gallery, Brooklyn, NY Babel; Queens Media Arts Development, Jackson Hts. Botanica; Hunterdon Museum of Art, New Jersey Your Documents Please; traveling group exhibition; Museum of Arts and Crafts, Itami, Japan; Hungary; etc. more..

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Amedeo Modigliani. Girl with a Polka-Dot Blouse (Jeune fille au corsage à pois). BF180


Peggy Washburn. Running Crow. #1007
Peggy Washburn
In my first-grade class we were taught to write with our right hand, though I was more comfortable with my left. We had big sheets of paper and were asked to make lines using our whole arm, then circles. I made hundreds, then thousands of circles. I love the symbolism a circle provides and how it represents cyclic movement and the idea of something mathematically perfect but not fully understood. I’ve always been inspired by Matisse, who exemplifies perfection in his perfectly imperfect, circular lines. I was particularly drawn to "Arranging the Hair of Hérodiade" and the implications in using a feminine figure to represent a masculine character. I like how the literary use of crows often implies memory and wisdom. In my response I’ve chosen the partial figure of a crow running toward us, with the purpose of implying hope while simultaneously interjecting the possibilities retrospect can provide for our future. I’m also moving the pencil back to my left hand… I’m learning to write again.

Peggy Washburn is an interdisciplinary photo-based artist whose work has been acquired by major collections including the Bibliotheque Nationale de France, The Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, The Ralph Lauren collection, Museo Nazionale della Fotografia in Bresca Italy and Seattle University. Along with numerous gallery shows her work has been exhibited at The Frye Art Museum, The Seattle Art Museum (SAM Gallery) and The Whatcom Museum of History and Art. Recent lectures about her work include The Portland Art Museum, University of Washington, and Photographic Center NW.

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Henri Matisse. Arranging the Hair of Hérodiade (La Coiffure d'Hérodiade). BF1093


Enzhao Liu. Henry Rousseau's Garden. #1041
Enzhao Liu
In my recent series, Henry Rousseau's Garden, which inspired by Henry Rousseau's painting in Barnes Foundation. I create ideal forests and space for the animals. All the birds are singing and happily living in this peaceable kingdom. All the species get along with one another. They celebrate the beauty of nature with color, lines, circles, dots, and patterns. In these paintings I want to express my good wish for the environment and nature, while also creating a surreal adventure simultaneously. For my materials, I use oil, acrylic and oil pastels on wood panels. Painting in oil enables me to utilize the techniques I learned from the history of Western painting. I also enjoy using water-based acrylics because they allow for more fluid brushstrokes, somewhat reminiscent of Chinese ink painting, which is a source of inspiration for me. I have used oil pastels since I was a child, and I think they are good tools for self-expression, and react to Rousseau was a self-taught artist, once again because of the fluency of the material.

Enzhao Liu is an artist working in Philadelphia. Liu has exhibited in major art fairs which for the best galleries in both Asia and United States, among which are Art Basel Hong Kong, Art Beijing, Art Taipei, Seattle Art Fair and LA Art Show. Liu’s work has also been shown in many major art museums in China, such as National Gallery of Art and CAFA Art Museum. Liu’s paintings are in the collections of CAFA Art Museum and Ningbo Museum of Art. In 2017, Liu won the PAFA Venture Funds and The Second Prize in the Philadelphia Tri State Artists Equity Fall Juried Exhibition. Liu just had solo show Symphony of Peace at the Old City Publishing. And Liu’s painting Revival of Life is in the permanent collection of Park Towne Place Museum District.

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Henri Rousseau. Scouts Attacked by a Tiger (Éclaireurs attaqués par un tigre). BF584


Corinne Holloway. Miss SoSo (Sophie Marie). #1011
Corinne Holloway
Childhood is deep emotion and a fantastical imagination in a small body. Or at least that’s the sentence that comes to mind when looking at Gauguin’s "Mr. Loulou (Louis Le Ray)." The vibrant colors, energetic lines, and ballooning shapes that make up so much of this piece are balanced by a child’s nuanced expression of intensity. Whether you you think Mr. LouLou is pouting, thinking, or observing, there is no doubt that all of his energy seems to be poured into his thought life as he sits with his hands folded in his lap. I’ve seen the same kind of absorbed expressions from my almost-two-year-old daughter. And, like Mr. LouLou, it’s hard to always figure out what exactly is causing her to make those faces. Sometimes it’s because she is experiencing a big emotion for the first time or maybe seeing her world in a new way. But whatever it is, such big emotions from such a small person has a soft humor about it. That subtle joke of juxtaposing the calm depth of an intense expression with such a cacophony of color and shape seemed so playful and did such a good job summing up childhood that it made me want to update it and make it personal. So as you look at "Miss SoSo (Sophie Marie)," I hope you enjoy the timelessness of a child being seriously playful (and maybe a little naughty too).

Corinne Holloway received her B.F.A. from West Texas A&M University but currently lives in Philadelphia. When she is not making art (or teaching community art lessons) you can find her reading books to her daughter. Although Holloway is primarily an abstract painter, she has an affinity for both portraiture and figurative drawing which stems from her love of fiction and narrative.

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Paul Gauguin. Mr. Loulou (Louis Le Ray). BF589


Q.T. Thunder. Domestic Scene with Hair Dryer on Fire. #1001
Q.T. Thunder
"There's a power strip next to the bed that sparks when the phone charger plugs in. And bedding and pillows and memory foam mattress are dangerously flammable. Sure the phone's memory is maxed out and the monthly data plan is depleted, but who worries about that when the house is on fire?" tl;dr This poem by Fragrant Garfield, a contemporary of Q.T. Thunder, is the inspiration for the artist's "Domestic Scene" series and a fitting enough statement for this work on its own but, with the prestige of being shown in The Barnes Foundation, not within ensembles that bring together the likes of Matisse and Renoir and Cezanne but in a classroom space where the heart of Dr. Barnes' mission really lives, it would be appropriate to give "Domestic Scene with Hair Dryer on Fire" another analysis. In an email interview with Q.T. the artist admired at length the palette of Matisse, these bright and bold colors always stand out as a work of Matisse when viewing Dr. Barnes' ensembles and these same colors affect Q.T.'s work with a similar flashiness. The two artists also have a tendency to neglect figures as the proxy for a viewer, rather the viewer is brought into a space left to contemplate the objects and surroundings for themselves with the help of color and line. In "Domestic Scene with Hair Dryer on Fire" Q.T. Thunder paints an otherwise familiar scene with an unsuspecting object fully ablaze. The bathroom is an ordinary place that doesn't tend to be a worrisome place, but being too comfortable can be devastating when the next moment is extraordinarily different from the last. But it doesn't have to be. Z. Decker Art Critic

Q.T. Thunder is a visual artist who wants to know if you have any good jokes.

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Henri Matisse. Studio with Goldfish (L'Atelier aux poissons rouges). BF569


Liz Vaughan. After the Storm - Green Street Philadelphia. #1163
Liz Vaughan
“After the Storm” is profoundly influenced by the classes at the Barnes Foundation. I learned to “see” like an artist – light, line, color, space. I learned about the artist’s purpose for painting –expressive, narrative, decorative or illustrative. I relearned what I knew instinctively, through objective discussions of the vast ensembles of the renowned Barnes collections. My receptive understanding became an expressive art language. Living in Philadelphia with its historic architecture, I was intrigued by the Paris street scene paintings of Maurice Utrillo. His eye-capturing observations of street life with its natural dramatic study of line and perspective brought this way of seeing to my own observations of street scenes in Philadelphia. However, I cannot possibly stop here to limit the Barnes influence on my artwork to any one artist. Along with Utrillo’s distinct use of space and line, I know I am significantly influenced by dramatic use of saturated color contrasts – light and dark, realized by the Spanish artists Goya and El Greco. And of course, I am influenced by Cezanne’s artwork, “father of modern art” and his unique use of paint, brushstroke, texture and composition. I have no doubt that my paintings are a studied synthesis of my exposure to the hundreds of artists in the Barnes collections as well as my own talent. I continue to be grateful for the knowledge and support I have gained from the Barnes Foundation and I to continue to use this support as a source of inspiration for my paintings. Thank you!

1990 Master of Arts in Teaching 1991 - 2001 Classroom Artist Teacher 2001 - 2017 New Jersey Dept of Education, Program Development Specialist 2010 - 2015 Student Barnes Foundation 2009 - 2018 Student Fleisher Art Memorial 2017 - 2018 Fleisher Art Memorial Art Studio


Maurice Utrillo. Street with Lampost. BF566


Laurie Beck Peterson. Sticks and Trees. #1026
Laurie Beck Peterson
Forests, and the trees that compose them, emerge out of a dance of layering and revealing. The cambium of trees grows in rings, then divides to create new tissue. Some of this tissue dies each year to become part of outer bark. The trees themselves grow, die, and eventually become soil, out of which grows more trees. Branches and leaves drop off, begin to decay and become part of a new forest landscape. As the layering and revealing shifts, so do the elements of light, line, color and space. Chaim Soutine and I are dealing with the same concepts and subject matter, however our mediums differs, as does our physicality and relationship to the surface of the image. There is little manipulation or distortion in my work, however the use of saturated color is central, with my approach and palette being more subtle. Rather than broad brushstrokes, the lines of the branches are thinner yet still create rhythmical repetition allowing for the areas in between to create spacial relationships. I chose Soutine's 'Group of Trees' as the inspiration for my new work 'Sticks and Trees', holding it in my mind as I worked to compose and visualize. Almost 100 years separate our works however I do not view my new work as a conceptual leap, but rather a contemporary step in working in landscapes.

After receiving my degree from Syracuse University studying at both SI Newhouse School of Public Communication and Crouse College School of Visual and Performing Arts, I launched my commercial photography career as an in house corporate photographer for Eastman Kodak Company. In addition to my current commercial work, I am deeply committed to my fine art work focusing on landscapes. This work is first produced as a photographic print, and then interpreted in the non-silver photographic processes of Gum Bichromate, Cyanotype and Palladium. Enlarged pinhole, Holga and cell phone images are the starting point for most of my pieces. I currently teach non-silver printmaking at UArts and hold workshops in alternative process.

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Chaim Soutine. Group of Trees (Groupe d'arbres). BF331


Jennifer Croney Chernak. Rhapsody. #1129
Jennifer Croney Chernak
In Matisse’s "Blue Still Life," I see the emotion of controlled optimism. "Blue Still Life" shows energy through the loose tendrils of the vines, the tilted plane, and the scattered fruits. This energy is highlighted further through the bright reds and yellows. The muted reference to a floral vine of wallpaper suggests another reality. My interpretation of this art sought to extend this energy and connect the interior still life with the strength of a mountain. The plant leaves in my painting are meant to be lush and loose, and the pink accents bring to life the wallpaper flowers in Matisse’s background. I used a window sill as the landing place for exuberance and a window as a way to make the rhapsody accessible to the natural world.

Jennifer Croney Chernak studied art at Mount Holyoke College and currently teaches conceptual art at the William Penn Charter School. She has exhibited locally in group shows.


Henri Matisse. Blue Still Life (Nature morte bleue). BF185


DeJeonge Reese. Rooted. #1000
DeJeonge Reese
My work is a visual representation of topics that tend to influence my daily life. I tend to be very observant; I pay attention to things others wouldn’t normally notice. Those things and people, is where I draw my inspiration for my work. The most common themes throughout my work are culture, spirituality, rituals, race, and modern day ideas/standards of beauty. By experimenting with multiple mediums and materials I aim to portray my perception of various concepts and ideas within these themes in hope to inspire my audience to maybe think or look at those same ideas and concepts in a way they might not have before; to expand their minds to a broader perception.

DeJeonge started out as a ceramic artist during her undergrad studies at Lincoln University of Pa. There she obtained her BS in Visual Arts in the fall of 2013. DeJeonge decided to continue her art education in 2015 when she was accepted into the MFA studio art program at Moore College of Art and Design. There she began to expand her studio and research practice and began to work with various mediums and concepts. Her work focuses mainly on the spiritual essence of an object, as well as ideals of beauty by the use of sculpture, performance, imagery, and video. DeJeonge's overall goal with her work is to generate conversations about how we think about certain objects and ideas in relation to ourselves.

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Unidentified artist. Mask (Kao Gle or Bu Gle). A277


Gabriel Martinez. Disco Demuth. #1093
Gabriel Martinez
In order to draw out the homoerotic undertones in “Two Trapeze Performers in Red” (1917), I photographically intermingled/fused documentation of Demuth’s intimately scaled watercolor with an image of amateur wrestlers appropriated from “Physique Pictorial” (1979), a classic queer publication. I created the print through a hybrid analogue darkroom process of contact printing, mirror-ball photograms and solarization. The rhythmic, circular mirror-ball silhouettes integrated within the image accentuate the sensuality of the performers. “Let’s Connect” has provided me with newfound interest in Charles Demuth’s work and life, and I’ve been diving into his world through research beyond the appreciation of his many works within the Barnes Collection. His deep connection to the Philadelphia region is of particular interest, as is his understated legacy & importance within queer culture. Jonathan Weinberg’s “Speaking for Vice: Homosexuality in the Art of Charles Demuth, Marsden Hartley, and the First American Avant-Garde” has been a valuable and enlightening resource. He examines Demuth’s work within the context of homosexual culture during the period between the wars. I want to continue to honor, re-examine and complicate Demuth’s work by drawing parallels to the disco era through the use of photography. Sadly, as many other gay men in history, his life was cut way too short due to illness. I’m sure he would have been a regular at Studio 54, mingling with other celebs. He would have loved watching Bette at the Continental Baths, or meeting up with Foucault for tea, or an evening of acrobatics aloft with poppers at the Mineshaft.

I am a Cuban-American multidisciplinary artist originally from Miami, FL. Although my work has been greatly motivated around the themes of loss, celebration, memorial, and cultural identity, the subject that has been central to my explorations has been that of masculinity within its various intricacies, contradictions and complexities. For most of my practice, I've investigated various issues related to masculinity from a queer perspective. Lately, I've been specifically focused upon LGBTQ history, with a particular interest in the milieu of the 1970s. I have worked on projects that touch upon various aspects of queer culture: Donna Summer, AIDS, the films of Wakefield Poole, the novels of John Rechy, Fire Island, and queer archives.

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Charles Demuth. Two Trapeze Performers in Red. BF644


Misty Sol. Mother Mary. #1047
Misty Sol
I educate, learn, and create with my children, my partner, my family, and with my friends, both old and new. I consult communities, corporations, institutions and private persons on utopian concepts, freedom and the bliss of humanity redefined. I create art that challenges us to imagine freedom... I am a writer, an illustrator, performer, eco artist, entrepreneur and futurist. I plant gardens. I sculpt and build with cob. I play with actors and dancers. I sing, I make pictures and tell stories like my grandmother. My practice is one of intentional path carving...improvisation in it's purest sense. I find seemingly disparate things and making them a whole. This is how an artistic life is built, a collage: layer by layer. This is how you build a song, a sculpture, a play, a story, a forest, a business, a raw vegan lasagna...

Misty Sol, is an interdisciplinary artist concerned with Black life. Her visual art has taken the form of murals, children's illustration, and collage. Her short stories have appeared in the anthology From Where they Sit: Black Writers Write Black Youth by Tiny Satchel Press. And her poetry and interviews will appear in an Anthology of women’s writing to be published by Serving House Books in the Spring of 2018. Notably, she received the 2016 Leeway Foundation $15,000 Transformation Award for her long term commitment to making art for social change.​

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Paul Cézanne. Madame Cézanne (Portrait de Madame Cézanne). BF710


Caleb Stoltzfus . The Nymph and the Dragon. #1073
Caleb Stoltzfus
Playful/Powerful. Decorative/Ritual. Secular/Saintly. Dr. Barnes had an eye for the thin line between seeming opposites. This is made especially apparent in the upper galleries, where viewers may find ancient Greek statues in the same room as 19th century Pennsylvania Dutch paintings. These pieces’ proximity emphasize a fascinating truth about art and humanity: that artists have been wrestling with the same themes and values throughout history, and this is evidenced by the continuity in their use of the elements of design. My piece “The Nymph and the Dragon” seeks to recreate the effect of taking in the range of objects in a Barnes gallery room, using the playful spirit of “The Girl Riding a Dog” as a jumping off point. I’ve included references to: -Renoir’s Bathers/landscape -Greek Nymphs -Amazon women warriors -Rubens’s heavenly figures -Early Christian motif of St Michael trampling the devil/St George slaying the dragon. -Birds as a symbol the Holy Spirit's blessing -Pennsylvania Dutch font and designs on the side of the painting I use this collaboration of references in my painting to depict the twin themes of victory (an ancient ideal, either religious or political) and success/leisure (modern ideal)-- which are often two sides of the same coin, as well as the theme of liberty/empowerment (contemporary ideal). I hope to convey this thematic thin line while also underscoring their obvious technical disparities: the soft, full brushstrokes of Renoir, the formal, symmetrical, composition of Baroque religious art, the simplicity and straightforwardness of both folk art and ancient art.

Caleb Stoltzfus (b. 1992) is originally from Elverson, PA. He began his art education studying at Studio Rilievo in Kennett Square, where he studied the fundamentals of painting and drawing in the Classical tradition under artist Neilson Carlin for 4 years. After graduating with a BA in art from Covenant College in 2015, he completed a year-long fellowship and solo show at The Harrison Center for the Arts in Indianapolis. He then spent 2016-2017 studying pleinair landscape painting and multi-figure composition in the Russian tradition under artist Daud Akhriev. Caleb is currently based out of Philadelphia.

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Unidentified artist. Little Girl on Dog. BF1180


Samantha Soifer. The Divine Feminine Mystique. #1019
Samantha Soifer
Inspired by the enigmatic young woman in Hélène Marie Marguerite's piece "Girl with Cat" I've deconstructed and rearranged elements of her painting. My intention is that the femininity of her piece be re-interpreted by any person who chooses to connect with the female power.

Samantha holds a BFA degree from Lesley University in Illustration and is inspired by nature, the occult, the divine feminine & historical imagery. She currently works mostly in embroidery and takes commissions for all manner of illustration and design projects.

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Hélène Marie Marguerite Perdriat. Girl with Cat. BF400


Msw productions. 3 eyed kangaroo. #1300
Msw productions
Persistent discovery

I have been a professional artist since 2001. It all started out acting, but has now branched out into all aspects of creative expression, leading to the formation of MSW Productions Currently they last project filmed, Jokes - Anger management, has been selected to screen at the Philadelphia Independent Film awards. Fine art paintings produced by in house artists have been featured at the Chris White Gallery in Delaware and part of an exhibition sponsored by the Charles County Arts Alliance MSW's first feature "The Real" and the ongoing series "Jokes" are both currently being broadcasted on Philly Cam's independent channel. As music producers, we've blended sound with visuals resulting in the videos Mustapha Ali and Early

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Pablo Picasso. Head of a Man (Tête d'homme). BF419


Christina Tarkoff. City Girls. #1256
Christina Tarkoff
Country Girls/City Girls While searching through the online Barnes Collection to find inspiration for the Let's Connect competition, I stumbled upon "Country Girls" by Edith Dimock. The painting immediately struck me. For several months, I have been trying to formulate, "Girl Power," a painting about three young girls enjoying a summer afternoon in Washington Square Park. Unhappy with my compositions, I locked the girls away in the artist-block portion of my brain. I knew immediately, "Country Girls" is not only an inspiration for Let's Connect, but it is my solution to "Girl Power." Despite the differences in time & culture, "Country Girls" communicates the female bonding message I hope to send with "Girl Power." With arms interlocked, Edith's girls are enjoying their time together and finding strength in each other. Although Edith's medium is watercolor/gouache and I paint in oil. Edith's composition is simple, elegant, and conveys the camaraderie and the youth of the girls. As expected, the painting is even more captivating in person. I returned home from the Barnes outing and immediately started sketching studies for my "Girl Power" painting. Along the way, I changed the name from "Girl Power" to "City Girls" to more closely compare/contrast to "Country Girls." "Country Girls" reflects an earlier time, "City Girls" reflects current times. My paintings tell stories that cross traditional barriers such as age, income, education & race to help us understand the most important art of all — the art of being human. Such as the simple story of girls enjoying a beautiful day in a beautiful city park.

Undergraduate degree from Temple-Tyler School of Art. Rome, Italy—Studied under the best painting, printmaking, and sculpture artists any student could hope for. Honors • Transforming Jazz. Philadelphia Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy's Art in City Hall. 2018 • Cover art, "Philadelphia Stories." 2018. • One Book, One Philadelphia Art Exhibit. Free Library of Philadelphia. 2018 • 2017 Winner & Honorarium Recipient. Cultureshare. Free Library of Philadelphia • Manayunk Arts Festival. 2017, 2018 • Small Oils. Phila Sketch Club. 2017,2018 My art tells stories that cross traditional barriers such as age, income, education & race to help us understand the most important art of all — the art of being human.

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Edith Dimock. Country Girls. BF352


Rusty Eveland. Mont Sainte-Limerick. #1074
Rusty Eveland





Paul Cézanne. Mont Sainte-Victoire (La Montagne Sainte-Victoire). BF13


Jane Schnitzer. Homage to Matisse in a Square. #1275
Jane Schnitzer
After years of work as a classically trained oil painter, my art practice has been distilled down into three basic elements: grid, color and value. Materials: Square plastic boxes, purchased off the shelf. Polyester film. Paper. Process: the plastic boxes form a grid. Film and paper are cut into squares and inserted into each box. Effect: The grid provides structure, stability, repetition and physical depth. The paper and film add color. The former gives texture and opacity. Conversely, the film, with an uneven,“wobbly” surface, contributes transparency, luminosity and reflection. _________________________________________________________________________ Comparison: "La Danse" versus "Homage to Matisse in a Square" Color: I have attempted to reproduce the predominant color in “La Danse”, as well as to replicate, in spirit, it’s “massing”. Subject: Representational versus abstract.—although the “square” was used by Albers as subject as well. Structure: Matisse's work is nestled within three-dimensional architectural elements. The grid in “Homage”, also three-dimensional, provides the same function, although static in effect. Movement: It is created in "La Danse"through composition (flowing figures, within rippling arches, against static blocks of color) and importantly, the use of line. In "Homage", movement is derived from the "dance" of reflection and light on the materials themselves, in counterpoint to the stasis of the grid and blocks of color. In summary, I've borrowed elements from Matisse and expressed them in contemporary form and materials. Great Fun! Thanks for the challenge

Milestones: two grown daughters. Art Education: Oil Painting Studio Incamminati, Art Students League, National Academy of Design, Metropolitan Museum of art Copyist Program, workshops-numerous Elected Memberships-Oil Painting National Association of Women Artists, Salmagundi Club, Artists Association of Nantucket, Pen and Brush (2002) Exhibitions-Oil Painting Studio Incamminati, Art Students League, National Academy of Design, Salmagundi Club, Artists Association of Nantucket, Lyme Art Association Collections-Oil Painting Private--numerous


Henri Matisse. The Dance. 2001.25.50a,b,c


Sarah Carr. The Wild Shore. #1197
Sarah Carr
In his piece, Henri Edmond Cross uses bold juxtapositions of bright colors to capture the essence of a sunlit Mediterranean shore. While we may not generally perceive bushes and trees as having deep blue shadows or see the shimmer of sunlight on water as pale lavender in hue, the subject of the painting is still clear. The colors, rather than faithfully reproducing what the eye might see, are allowed instead to evoke mood, temperature, and even the passage of time. I was inspired to create my own landscape thinking about color in this special way. For me, color is the beginning of everything. When I choose a palette, it organizes my thoughts in particular direction. As I create a thick, handmade laminated felt with many layers of differently colored wool fleece, the fibers migrate through the layers, making the colors almost shimmer. I slice through the finished felt, revealing layers of vibrant hues. The end result is a landscape which I hope evokes an emotional response in the viewer, just as the inspiration painting does. I hope you can feel the cool shade under the tree while the heat of the sun touches the shrubs like fire, and hear the gently rolling waves of the ocean. I have tried to capture one of those impossibly long days of summer, when afternoon stretches into evening in the golden light.

Sarah Carr is a multi-disciplinary artist based in Philadelphia, PA. Her work includes fiber art, dance, performance, and writing. Sarah has a BA in Anthropology from Marshall University, where she also studied weaving and learned felting, spinning and fiber dyeing techniques from Michael Cornfeld. She is active on instagram as @carrarts, and is a member of the Surface Design Association and International Feltmakes Association.

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Henri Edmond Cross. Two Women by the Shore, Mediterranean. BF436


Aschak. We Three Kings. #1038
Aschak
All of Soutine’s work called out me. I liked the distortion of his forms, particularly his depiction of hands and his freedom of expression. I chose to emulate some of his technique in this particular work while still holding onto my own style of work.

I am a Philadelphia Artist and Poet, originally from Trinidad. Founder of the writer’s and reader’s showcase and Peace Tools. My paintings tell stories of past experiences, geared towards sharing positive perspectives.


Chaim Soutine. Praying Man (L'Homme en prière). BF367


Luisa Henao. Entre Dos Lugares. #1170
Luisa Henao
The family in Horace Pippin's painting "Giving Thanks" inspired me to explore my family's dynamic and its impact on my identity as a child immigrant and a young American female.



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Horace Pippin. Giving Thanks. BF990


MsPassionArt. EAT. #1202
MsPassionArt


Serena Saunders is an artist from Philadelphia. Her work as a painter has a fresh, color-strong perspective that speaks to our imagination while the subjects ask of our attention. Her often large-scale and poetically composed paintings offers the viewer layers of narrative. Pulling from her fashion design background, the artist is also known for wardrobing her muses with clothing she designed to support the vision. You will often find a matter of injustice or undying hope fighting its way through the line work to prevail at the surface. It is clear that her work is influenced by her compassion towards youth, women and community. The artist left non-profit work and currently paints at her home studio full-time.

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Central German Master. Last Supper. BF851


Nancy Agati. la porte. #1165
Nancy Agati
I have always been fascinated by the wrought iron works that are interspersed amongst the paintings at the Barnes Foundation. I find myself drawn to the intricate details of the hand-crafted pieces that are both sculpture and drawing, function and form. For me, the iron works help define the formal aspects of each room and lead my eye to details I may have overlooked otherwise. I made several drawings in the museum of various iron work door knockers and knobs before I settled on this final iron piece from 17th Century France. The work I produce is often in response to organic and geometric forms found both in nature and amongst architectural objects. A recent series of works on paper, entitled Portico, began with a design element from a carved wooden doorway in Rome. My piece for Let's Connect, responds to the floral, symmetrical and geometric elements of this door knob/ pull escutcheon. It utilizes some of the basic shapes, curves and linear details in a repetitive and overlapping manner. My intent is to bring attention to the intricacies and beauty of the original handcrafted iron work, while drawing inspiration from it to create a companion piece through drawing and painting. The title of my piece is "la porte", French for the door, which refers back to the object's use. The materials used were ink, hand-made paint from clay, slate, graphite and polymer on black paper, mounted to panel.

Originally from upstate NY, Nancy Agati relocated to Philadelphia with a BFA from Alfred University, School of Art & Design. Agati earned her MFA in 2007 from The University of The Arts, Philadelphia. She has exhibited her work throughout Philadelphia and nationally in a range of mediums from drawing, textile and sculpture to site-specific installations and public art. She has been a recipient of a Windows of Opportunity Award from the Leeway Foundation, and has had artist residencies at the Santa Fe Art Institute, New Mexico, Lo Studio dei Nipoti, Calabria, Italy and at Main & Station, Nova Scotia. As a recent Tending Space Fellow, Agati has been exploring the practice of mindfulness meditation in relation to her art making process.

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Unidentified maker. Door Knob or Pull Escutcheon. 01.05.25


A.RIVERA. "HSP". #1181
A.RIVERA
This is diversifying portraiture. The clothing choice is a representation of the culture of today's youth. The piece as a whole is a perspective of people living in a time where it is freethinking vs conformers.

Highly sensitive person, passionate, puerto rican/mexican american, overweight, lesbian, felon, never finished a painting, never took an art class, trying to make it into a white man's museum.


Vincent van Gogh. The Postman (Joseph-Étienne Roulin). BF37


Dani Banner. "Journey to the Other Side". #1245
Dani Banner
This piece incorporates many elements found in the original Monet painting "Girl with Dog" (1873). In this version, the girl and dog are crossing through the painting into three-dimensional space, symbolizing the way art transcends beyond the canvas, into our world and influencing our lives.

Dani Banner is a designer and traditional artist based in Philadelphia. By day, she works in research and design for the healthcare industry, and by night, she enjoys painting, illustration, and making miniatures.

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Claude Monet. Girl with Dog. BF857


Karen T Stabenow. Vote!. #1086
Karen T Stabenow
Knowing that The Barnes Foundation is designed and continues to promote "the advancement of education and the appreciation of the fine arts and horticulture, I looked for a painting that I could repurpose to express my concerns about Climate Change. Barnes believed that art had the power to improve minds and transform lives. I believe this too. I selected the “Street with Lampost” by Mau rice Utrillo. In this painting, exterior walls are an opportunity for a French graffiti artist. I imagine that the weathered political posters from the successful Presidential candidacy of Emmanuel Macron are still visible in France. And below the posters a new poster with a simple message “Rendre Notre Planète Verte à Nouveau”, Make Our Planet Green Again, a riff on our Dear President’s mantra “Make America Great Again”. Utrillo’s painting, completed nearly 100 years ago when the words Climate Change did not exist, but 100 years later we now face the greatest existential threat ever to all species on our planet. For me, the ability to collect visual images is imperative. I endeavor to be frank in my observations and submit this painting that it might have the power to improve minds and transform lives.

My life is equally divided between art and science. In college I received degrees in biology, environmental science, and urban planning. At the same time, always painting and taking art courses throughout a career in science. Current work focuses mostly on Arctic Landscapes and Climate Change. Abstract expressionism and minimalism depict the drama taking place in a world that evokes threats and hopes, a world many do not directly observe or touch. 2018 Cerulean Gallery, “Arctic Landscapes” Philadelphia, PA (Current Show) 2018 First Street Gallery, “Arctic Landscapes”, New York, NY. 2017 Cerulean Gallery, First Prize, Fifth Annual Juried Exhibition, Philadelphia, PA

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Maurice Utrillo. Street with Lampost. BF566


Christine Stoughton. Marionettes Demuth's Way. #1016
Christine Stoughton
Inherent in the making of art is the transformation of a creative impulse into a creative action. My work is strongly motivated by this idea of change, both in the making of the work and in the final image. Thus the capturing of the ephemeral is my focus. The work is often presented in an informal manner with the intent of emphasizing the aesthetics of the everyday.I allow the viewer to experience the process I as an artist went through in the making of the work by leaving evidence of the manipulation of the materials used in the final product. Charles Demuth's Vaudeville and circus themed watercolors have always captured my imagination with their emphasis on portraying a fleeting moment in time. His ability to show figures in motion and suggest sweeping changes in light, while also allowing the viewer to experience the fluidity and transparency of the paint, provide a perfect merging of image with material. His painting,"In Vaudeville: Woman and Man on Stage", give us two relatively flat figures that suggest, but don’t illustrate,the postures of marionettes being followed by sweeping spotlights. "Marionettes, Demuth’s Way" is my whimsical three dimensional interpretation of this watercolor. Most of the materials used, except for silk, wood and copper, had a paper component that accepted watercolor. These included paper clay, naturally stained tea bags, and handmade abaca paper shapes. My goal in choosing materials is to maintain the integrity of the material while transforming it in a manner that allows the artist and the viewer to experience it in a new and often surprising way.

Christine Stoughton is an artist and art educator. She is an instructor of art aesthetics at the Barnes Foundation. She teaches printmaking at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Main Line Art Center and for the Professional Institute of Educators program at the University of the Arts. She obtained her diploma from PAFA and her Ph.D. from Boston College. She maintains a studio in the Norristown Arts Building, Norristown, Pa.. Her art is strongly influenced by her work as a psychologist, and by Eastern thought with its focus on change and the ephemeral. A complete bio, artist statement and images of her work can be found on her website.

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Charles Demuth. In Vaudeville: Woman and Man on Stage. BF601


Cory Danielle Kram. Bird. #1254
Cory Danielle Kram





Joan Miró. Group of Women (Groupe de femmes). BF1188


Anthoula Bebi. Lemons and Teacup. #1014
Anthoula Bebi
My painting Lemons and Teacup is inspired by Renoir's Oranges, Bananas and Teacup. I love the Mediterranean feel of the painting and it reminds me of summer evenings in Greece. The memories are still vivid and Renoir's painting helped me connect with them again. I used lemons as they are such a big part of my culture and my favorite fruit! I am grateful to have the opportunity to participate in such an amazing event.

I love creating and painting helps me express myself. My work is inspired by nature and my greek heritage. Painting greeting cards has allowed me to fulfill my passion for art and express my gratitude for creating something that will make someone smile.


Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Oranges, Bananas, and Teacup (Oranges, bananes et tasse de thé). BF61


Venetia Bebi. Mother of Cockatiels. #1013
Venetia Bebi
When I decided to enter the juried exhibition at Barnes,I was set on working with Monet who is my favorite painter. All changed when I came face to face with Courbet's Woman with Pigeons. It was like I was seeing myself with my feathered children in a past life. My version is an updated, modern twist with bold colors bringing Courbet's vision into the present. Mother of Cockatiels was so much fun to work on and I hope it brings a smile to all who see it.

A self taught Artist, Venetia used her skills to enhance her happy classroom environment when she was a Special Ed teacher. A right hand work injury changed her path. Determined to prove the Dr.’s prognosis that ended her Special Ed career wrong, Venetia used her innate artistic skills as therapy to heal herself. She is now painting, drawing and twisting wire to make beautiful statement pieces. Venetia has participated in many exhibitions in the tri-state area and was the second place winner in the “Small Treasures” Juried Exhibition 2012 at Beauty Gallery.

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Gustave Courbet. Woman with Pigeons. BF824


Carlye Norton. The Past and The Future. #1145
Carlye Norton
"The Present and the Future" continues the story of the wife at the center of Rousseau's "The Past and the Present." By combining modern techniques like digital painting and photo-manipulation with an updated gender dynamic, I sought to present a playful take on how a modern version of Rousseau's wife might celebrate newfound female independence.

Carlye Norton is an artist and writer currently living with her husband and too many dogs in South Philly.

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Henri Rousseau. The Past and the Present, or Philosophical Thought (Le Passé et le présent, ou Pensée philosophique). BF582


Ellana Cohen. PAFA Girls . #1235
Ellana Cohen
My submission champions the work of Edith Dimock. The Barnes only has about 30 works of female artists and I wanted to take this opportunity to highlight the excellent work of this artist whose small watercolors are often overshadowed by works of Picasso or her husband Glackens. Especially, as a female artist myself and solely working with the motif of female issues, I felt it extremely necessary to take this chance to have a work of mine in the Barnes Foundation in conversation with the male centered collection. Dimock was an outspoken, admirable feminist and it is an honor submitting my rendition of her piece.

I am an art student at the Pennsylvania Academy of the fine arts. I am a 3rd year painting major. I am originally from Miami but Philly is my new home and I love the tight knit artist community here. I mostly do collage work and assemblage as well as watercolor. The themes in my work are largely feminist and involving identity.

Website

Edith Dimock. Country Girls. BF352


Abbie Sue. She is the Reader. #1303
Abbie Sue
I'm not good with words. But I love the way light moves. Jazz inspires me. - Abbie Sue I enjoy the Barns collection because of the rhythm and energy that surrounds and connects each piece. My submission carries the same rhythm and joy. That is what makes art so truly amazing, is its ability to transfer a wide rage of emotions that we all as humans feels regardless of race, social class or gender. Art is a equalizer.

My old man's a white old man And my old mother's black. If ever I cursed my white old man I take my curses back. If ever I cursed my black old mother And wished she were in hell, I'm sorry for that evil wish And now I wish her well My old man died in a fine big house. My ma died in a shack. I wonder where I'm going to die, Being neither white nor black? - Langston Hughes I was raised in a conservative Christian family in rural Virginia. I stated painting and making at the tender age of 7. Art saved my life and a artist is who I am. No formal training. My work centers around texture, color, and childlike intuition.


Jacques Lipchitz. Reader II. A205


Solveig Imsdahl. Before Bed. #1283
Solveig Imsdahl





Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Before the Bath (Avant le bain). BF9


Danielle Morris. Alms. #1131
Danielle Morris
Alms depicts a young goddess gathering her offerings to distribute amongst her followers.

Danielle Morris is a self taught street photographer who's style has been inspired by Roy Decavara and Dawoud Bey. She is a black woman evolving from her current state of black womanhood and looking to foster the embodiment of power, confidence, self love, and spirituality through the exploration, acceptance, and love of blackness and identity within that blackness. She is a hoarder of moments and memories and captures life as she sees it.

Website

Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Girl with Basket of Oranges (Marchande d'oranges). BF65


Bryon Wackwitz. the joy of living. #1080
Bryon Wackwitz
those damn Russians need to stay out of our elections....f*ck trump.

professional artist and airbrush artist and owner of mutt airbrush and art supply.

Website

Vincent van Gogh. Reclining Nude (Femme nue étendue sur un lit). BF720


Birdie Busch. Quilt Cape . #1237
Birdie Busch
The shared space in Pippin’s “Giving Thanks” moves me not only for the immediate connection I feel to its folk art lines and primary palette but for the peculiar nature of this activity from the vantage point of 2018. What does giving thanks look like in the 21st century? Does the collective experience still exist without frayed energies? Everything in Pippin’s painting, despite the lack of extreme detail, seems incredibly focused, powerful and cohesive. The women with their calm resolve and the textiles peppering the room make the environs whole. It’s women in my life that know the importance of this kind of domestic gathering as a necessity to our health, as an envelope of warmth and a toast to knowing that it’s good to be together. I find this to be one of the most cohesive things for me in the world’s current state. I think that the women in Pippin’s painting felt the same for whatever their woes and contemplations were at the time. My watercolor is a reflection on the textiles and the women. How these talismen made for each other and the intentional love surrounding them transform us in these shared rooms time and time again.

I have been a working sonic and visual artist in the city of Philadelphia for the past 15 years. I treat this city as its own country, or perhaps its own world, and have come to know so many of its people, all rich and meandering in their journey, and feel akin to them. I strive to reveal things in a way that doesn’t seem like a dissertation but rather a keyhole and I place a lot of intention on distilling the complexities of our stories down to core truths via the paths of folk art and song.

Website

Horace Pippin. Giving Thanks. BF990


Crystal Davis-Roth. Musical Nonsense. #1009
Crystal Davis-Roth
The art at the Barnes has inspired me to try new techniques and really be more present in my art. The piece I selected was a Picasso. I learned more than I ever knew about the artist. As I was developing my piece I felt a connection to Picasso’s work. I believe my piece shows the connection.

Crystal is a self taught artist who uses bright, vivid colors with an array of mediums. From spray paint and stencil art to acrylic and collage work, Crystal finds her inspiration from urban and graffiti art. Crystal likes to be outside and find inspiration from her travels around the world.

Website

Pablo Picasso. Violin, Sheet Music, and Bottle. BF673


Daniel Neufeld. Horse Play. #1056
Daniel Neufeld
I get inspired by almost anything that gives me ideas and visions about how I can express myself to other people with my artwork. I mainly get inspiration from exhibitions at museums as well as things in nature. The piece I selected to draw and paint from, located at the Barnes Foundation, is the Edgar Degas piece Jockeys and Race Horses. What drew my attention to this particular painting is the composition, and it made me remember when I rode horses as a young boy until after I was 15. I even found myself learning how to draw horses from art technique books. Now there are a few differences between the Degas piece I looked at and the version I painted of the same subject; I used acrylics instead of oils, gave the equestrians and their horses facial features, and added blossoms to the trees in the background. In my artwork, the mediums that I enjoy working with are pencils, charcoal, pastels, pen and ink, water-colors, acrylics, and oil paints. Water-colors are easy and convenient for me to take along wherever I go on my travels. I use acrylics and gouaches to build up details and paint crisp edges realistically. When using oil paints, I blend the colors together in a loosely and improvisational manner.

• Holland Middle School (1998 to 2001) • Council Rock High School South (2001-2004) • Bucks County Community College as a fine arts major (2004-2010) When I was a young boy, I grew fond of fine art through my mother, an artist. I’m into drawing, painting, ceramics, printmaking, photography, comic books, and animation. Subjects that I enjoy capturing with my pencils and paints are people, still lives, and sites that I see on my travels; buildings, landscapes, and railroads from direct observation and photographs I take. One thing for sure, I have a way with pictures from my heart and mind.

Website

Edgar Degas. Jockeys and Race Horses. BF572


Lia Mira. Blossoming Queen . #1229
Lia Mira
“Art is a energy force the connects all cultures from all around the world”. This is what I felt after viewing Dr. Barnes Collection. I did find myself more drawn to intricate detailed creations and most of all the Sculptures and Carvings. My Medium of Chainmaille is very much a time consuming sculpting technique and I really get impressed with time dedicated works. The African Mask Pendant I chose for my inspiration reminded me of a King or some sort of male Ruler. Next to every man of amazing strength and wisdom usually blossoms a Powerful Woman holding him together. Beautiful and delicate but strong and sharp, She is my “Blossoming Queen”. In Chainmaille sculpting there are various types of weaves, ring gauges, and metal findings to link together. Traditional medieval battle arms were welded rings to create a mesh called (Chainmaille) or scales (Dragonscales). I used about 1000 anodized aluminum scales and jump rings to make this Blossoming creation, linking each piece individually with my pliers. I feel my “Blossoming Queen” has a story to tell. She fits right in with the many Faces and Characters you’ll find in the Barnes Collection!

Born an raised in Philadelphia Lia was born naturally gifted in all things creative. Her mother also a natural, noticed her talents and made sure to allow Lia to explore in Art Programs. All before the age of 10 Lia accumulated many trophies & medals. From Saturday mornings at Fleshier to Summer programs at Moore Lia was introduced to various forms of Fine Arts at a very early age. Life unfortunately took a unexpected path for Lia during her teenage years and Art fell to the rear but never disappeared. Every once in awhile the creative itch would appear and 7 years ago Metal called to her in the form of Chainmaille Armor. A Modern & Artistic take on a rare lost Art that requires a lot of attention but her Love & Passion for it is Priceless!

Website
Website 2

Unidentified artist. Mask Pendant. A126


Jeff Fadellin. Three Apples 2018. #1267
Jeff Fadellin
Simple can be complex. And while not all of the details fall within our lines, it's often better that way.



Website

Paul Cézanne. Three Apples (Deux pommes et demie). BF57


Amy Junod Placentra. Germination. #1176
Amy Junod Placentra
Germination is a fanciful interpretation of what Camille Monet might have created while seated at her embroidery stand, as her husband depicts her in Madame Monet Embroidering. What would she create left alone with her thoughts, in a conservatory lush with texture, color, and curved vegetation? Perhaps she would turn 1800s surface decoration on its head, with wild volumetric free-stitch. Perhaps she would use embroidery in its traditional allegorical capacity to symbolize growth, her enlarging family, her hopes for the future, the emergence of a new art scene. Maybe she would experiment with form, space and color, pushing the boundaries of “a woman’s pastime” in ways similar to how her husband pushed the boundaries of painting. Seated in the drapey dreamy cocoon-like space of Madame Monet Embroidering, what liberties would she take with her handwork? She was 28 at the time she sat for Madame Monet Embroidering, and hers had already been a life of drama, persistence and turbulence. She had experienced unplanned pregnancy, out of wedlock birth, periods of single parenthood, estrangement from family, and desperate poverty. Would her unconventional 20s lead to a conventional composition? In Germination, Camille Monet’s take on botanical needlework is bold, frenetic and slightly unraveled. While Germination adopts the curvilinear and textural elements of Madame Monet Embroidering it seeks to tell a different story, an animated inner story, of a figure that was much more than just a part of the Impressionist scenery.




Claude Monet. Madame Monet Embroidering (Camille au métier). BF197


Nancy Parks. Fly Red Bird-Fly. #1034
Nancy Parks
Art is about ideas, messages, and stories. How I go about expressing them with materials that enhance and support the ideas. Most of my art is in Series and I try to focus on symbols, composition, rhythm, color, or patterns; suggestion and suspension on the paper or canvas surface. Letting the images come together as a story and message, out of context, but still representing the original form. As an artist, I observe, collect, think, feel and produce. I approach this role respectfully and with a great sense of responsibility. I believe the art speaks for itself and I always attempt to express an aesthetic quality in making my Art.

Nancy Parks has a BFA from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, major in Drawing, minors in Printmaking and Graphic Design. Additional art studies: University of the Arts, Fleisher Art Memorial.Some of her Exhibitions include: City Hall, May 2018 Celebrate Arts & Aging; HBHQ Design Space, Ritual Reading Room 2017 December-February 2017-2018; Main Line Art Center,FlipSide Community Exhibition, Fall 2016; AIGA Philadelphia, PageMaker Exhibit, Spring; West Philadelphia Community Acupuncture Center, January-February 2015; 3rd Street Gallery-Community Exhibition, September 2013; Featured Window Artist-Daffy’s Department Store, May 2007; She is a published poet,avid cook with published recipes.You may contact her about her work or questions.


Unidentified artist. House and Bird on a Tree. BF1162


Joseph Iacona. Collection Vessel. #1090
Joseph Iacona
As a collector, Albert Barnes weaved together a narrative not only by the objects he choose to collect, but by the ways in which he arranged, displayed, and juxtaposed these artworks redefining their individual meaning, to bring about a larger conversation; between the makers of these objects and what really connects us as people. As an artist I am interested in telling stories and creating new narratives that encourage an alternative viewpoint to the everyday. While walking the Barnes, I was inspired by so much of the art that I began to “collect” and curate my own selection; I looked at countless still life paintings (ascension #BF205 ) and painted abstractions (ascension #BF2548 ); Native American water jars (ascension #A388) and Greek Kraters (ascension #A121 ) were certainly of interest in my vessel form and patterning; I also took note of the many metal works, keyholes, locks, and daggers (ascension #01.11.53AB ) and these became the plant-like still life sprawling out of the vessel. Finally in the center archway pattens of the vessel is an homage to Henri Matisse’s mural “The Dance” (ascension# 2001.25.50a,b,c). As I arranged these many inspirations into a culminating work, I took note of the play between artifact and artifice present in the faux Egyptian relief “The Offering” by Charles Prendergast (ascension #BF467 ). This served as an inspiration for how one can emulate the past, to create in the present, and foresee a narrative for future interpretations.

As an artist, Joseph Iacona explores the connections found between natural history, art history, and human history. In his work, Iacona juxtaposes objects, images, and motifs to create new points of reference for viewing and understanding the world. Iacona has exhibited in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, City Hall, The Thomas Eakins House, The Clay Studio, Delaware Museum of Art, Delaware Center for Contemporary Art and the Allentown Museum of Art. He served as a lead teaching artist for Mural Arts and is currently the Delphi Programs Coordinator at Philadelphia Museum of Art. Joseph is an alumni of Art21 Educators.

Website

Henri Matisse. The Dance. 2001.25.50a,b,c


Anthony Bowers. Little Baby on Dog, 21st century. #1030
Anthony Bowers
Originally I was drawn to this painting from the Barnes collection 'Little Girl on Dog, 19th-20th century' because of it's whimsy and the way that it mixes everyday life with a kind of fantasy that I associate with the time period in which it was made. I thought it would be nice to make a new version of that painting which updates that sense of easy whimsy into a messy four way negotiation that feels a little more like I experience life now. Having a young child also makes you keenly aware of the staging and curating that social media encourages and it was nice to think about that in a painting language similar to that of the many post-impressionists that I admire from the Barnes collection.

Anthony Bowers is an artist working in painting and installation in Philadelphia where he received his MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from the University of Pennsylvania. He has curated several exhibitions in Philadelphia and is an active participant in Philadelphia's Artist-Run scene. Originally from the midwest, Anthony holds a BFA in Painting from Indiana University and has attended residencies such as the Golden Foundation Painting Residency, Wassaic Projects, and the Apprenticeship program at the Fabric Workshop and Museum.

Website

Unidentified artist. Little Girl on Dog. BF1180


Lesley Haas. Interpreting Klee. #1088
Lesley Haas
As a paper artist, Lesley Haas creates visual dialogues between the malleability, tactility, and texture of paper and translates them into contemporary sculptural works. Her artworks explore the infinite possibilities of paper suggested by both the specific and the universal – a broken sidewalk or the current political turmoil. Lesley began her studio work in Heidelberg, Germany, where she started Hand Print Productions, creating hundreds of innovative picture frames by papering, stamping, and lettering with paint. She also experimented with handmade paper pulps, using a palette of sisal, cotton, and flax. Rough, textured and raw, handmade paper rhythmically merges into a collage. Over the years she has employed a range of techniques—tearing, cutting, painting, pressing, molding, and folding. With her paper she creates narratives as a painter does with paint. Using a mixture of materials, she translates infinite and innovative possibilities into visual paper fabrications. Lesley’s interest in paper arts was originally sparked by a visit to the Printmaking on Handmade Paper exhibition at MOMA, the Museum of Modern Art, in New York City when the modern renaissance in paper an artistic medium was beginning. Her work has been shown internationally at Santa Maria della Scala, Siena, Museo del Corso, Rome, The Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C, Museo della Carta e della Filigrana, Fabriano, Italy and the Museum of Art and Design, NYC, among others.

Lesley Haas was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and has made her home in Heidelberg, Germany from 1988 until 1996 and from 1999 - 2000. Since September, 2006, she is again living in Philadelphia. I developed an interest in handmade paper after viewing a comprehensive exhibit in which the artworks were made with paper in New York City. Paper is an important material to me. Not in the common sense of what we all use everyday, but as an art medium. I re-use all types of paper, creating objects and wall pieces. Paper endures and will always co-exist with the digital world. My materials are recycled or handmade and I have recently added paint to the paper.

Website

Paul Klee. Sicilian Landscape (Sicilische Landschaft). BF1005


Brittany De Nigris. longing fragment. #1065
Brittany De Nigris
I was inspired by the Sea Chest by an unknown artist. I was curious about what was ever inside of this thing, what journeys it may have made. I imagined it floating. Because it is itself a vessel of sorts, in my mind it is an object that holds; I wondered if it was locked and secret, unexplored. Much of my work has to do with fragility, even the fragility of a great journey. I find it curious that when seeing this carved chest I Immediately assigned a strange, even romantic fantasy to it. Maybe it sat in an attic before it was acquired as part of this collection. Perhaps it was made in anticipation of a voyage that never happened or that was never going to happen. The way this collection is arranged makes me think about how the histories and meanings of the images and objects are so carefully curated to make connections that can be at same time highly attuned and also opaque—intentional, idiosyncratic and mysterious. I chose to use ceramic in part because of how objects that are seemingly unrelated materially or conceptually are used to describe each other acting as translators. Some of the images that are placed around the chest make me think of waiting or dreaming. To me the chest is about secrets and possibilities, weight and buoyancy, time stopped. It has been decontextualized from its own story and placed within the story of this collection. Longing fragment functions as both interior and surface; it is the disembodied heart or lock to an unknown object or place and also like a piece of a torn off map, the reflective glazed surface becomes water and foam, carrying a small vessel or piece of a journey upon it.

Brittany De Nigris (b.1987) has travelled widely as part of her practice. She has lived in Wyoming, working as a housekeep at a guest ranch, in Connecticut as a book-maker and fine printer's apprentice and currently works at The University of Delaware as a post MFA fellow and studio technician in Ceramics. She has participated in residencies with Kyung Hee University (Seoul), Art Farm Nebraska (USA) and The Arctic Circle Program (Spitsbergen). She has also spent time in Japan, China, Italy and Germany working and researching independently. As part of her practice she often collaborates with the 181 Collective to create intricately networked live performances. She received her MFA from Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA).

Website

Unidentified maker. Sea Chest. 01.06.17


Jule (Juli) Snyder. Hope (aka Masts II). #1210
Jule (Juli) Snyder
My piece was inspired by Charles Demuth's 'Masts'. Typically, my art is primarily inspired by emotion and the subconscious. Although not the style I normally gravitate to, something about 'Masts' spoke to me more than any other work of art in The Barnes the day I chose this piece; it wanted to be my inspiration for this exhibition. As I worked on this painting and spoke with others about it, I came to see the symbolism. A heavier, darker base transitioned to a lighter, delicate, spacious, intricately detailed upper area. It felt natural to incorporate bright, hopeful components especially towards the top, including my signature metallic accents. Hope, duality and the human condition are prominent themes in my art.

Jule (Julianne) Snyder has had a need for creative expression as long as she can remember. She's an entrepreneur, philanthropist, advocate and Temple University graduate. One of her primary goals, other than being a full time artist, is to evoke; encouraging viewers to remember who they really are, to awaken or reawaken connections to ourselves and others. Jule aims to make the world a better place through her work, inspirational words and focus on helping those who need it. She regularly donates art and money to animal rescues. A huge part of why we're here is to lift each other up and if we're in a position to do so, we should.

Website

Charles Demuth. Masts. BF343


Arthur B. Ostroff. Rosa la Rouge - Chaude. #1292
Arthur B. Ostroff
My favorite piece in The Barnes Collection is Henri Toulouse-Lautrec’s “Rosa la Rouge” portrait. It is totally unlike anything else I have seen of his work. Years ago, I acquired a print, masked out the info, and showed it to colleagues at a UArts class; no one recognized the artist. Using the abstraction techniques I have developed over time, I created the submitted work, as an homage to the master...

Arthur Ostroff was born in Philadelphia and has a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. A global traveler, his journeys began in the U.S. Army, which took him to Korea and Japan. Later travels took him to Europe, residing in Amsterdam, Brussels, Rome and Prague, working in graphic design, art and illustration, and audio visual production. Ostroff has exhibited in Belgium, Holland, Italy, France, the Czech Republic, England, Canada and the U.S. Among his awards are a Medaille d’Argent in France, a Best in Show at a Scenes of the Schuylkill expo, a Bertha M. Goldberg Award at a PAFA Fellowship show, and a Gold Medal at the Da Vinci Art Alliance.

Website

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. A Montrouge–Rosa La Rouge. BF263


Duwenavue Johnson. Miklos dreams. #1309
Duwenavue Johnson
I chose this artist due to the dreamlike quality of the work. I felt that this artist was unique to the whole collection. I felt it was old yet new, modern yet folk inspired.

Professional Hand embroiderer with a love for painting and fine art.


Gustave Miklos. Figure Motif. BF393


Delia King. #ganggang_put_spider_chris_yeow_e_haas. #1175
Delia King
"#ganggang_put_spider_chris_yeow_e_haas" is a two-layer reverse glass painting It depicts men on the block biddn'. "Biddn" is like a "roast" where you crack jokes at others expense, the winner being the one who leaves his opponent with nothing left to say as everyone laughs. The original Picasso painting reminded me of the men I knew, the women volunteered for the picture, but I was stuck by how the painting was about men as a group, standing together, wearing their fresh clothes, biddn, and so the painting appreciate men. I was also inspired by the hardware on the walls and wanted to include pattern into the painting surface of the piece to highlight the men's complexities and to draw the viewer into a deeper experince.

Delia King is 44 year old reverse glass painter and muralist living in SW Philly. She attended St. John's College in Santa Fe and holds a B.A. in the humanities from Thomas Edison State College in Trenton. Her art background is in experience and practice. She recently ended a 4 year haitus from art to focus on mental health recovery. She was diagnosed with PTSD related to a sexual assault in 2014. She was recently declared well by WOAR. This is her first painting in years.


Pablo Picasso. Group of Catalans in Montmartre: Pichot, Mañach, Casagemas, Brossa, Picasso, and Gener. BF2049


Jessica O'Lear. Shame. #1151
Jessica O'Lear
Renoir's Nude in a Landscape presents a woman who stands out amongst the background. She is there nude painted in a beautiful way where she is the subject. I was inspired by this shameless display of the full bodied female figure and reminded of the body shaming and insecurities women encounter today. My piece reflects those feelings of shame and the insecurity of not being comfortable with one's body. While Renoir's nude stands out against the landscape, my nude blends into the landscape around her. By blending in and hiding the figure's face the feelings of body insecurity are emphasized. In contrast to Renoir presenting a figure that stands out in the landscape which is bright and and open. My figure blends in to a darker and more chaotic landscape which helps to illustrate those darker feelings of shame and insecurity. Her face covered to illustrate feelings of shame but also to exemplify the objectification of the female body in society. This piece comes together by intricately layering multiple photographs over one another to create a figure and space that best speaks to emotional response of body insecurity.

Jessica’s work is inspired by the emotions and memories evoked from places and experiences. By capturing space and manipulating the image to focus on emotion and memory, she allows for the audience to place themselves in that space. The viewer is able to internalize and digest the emotions to better understand the reality of the experience. She works to emphasize and tell the story of the human experience by transcending a single snapshot; focusing not only what was seen in the moment, but how it felt and what it reminded her of.

Website
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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Nude in a Landscape (Nu dans un paysage). BF975


Meg McCauley. Machine Drawing: Still Life. #1146
Meg McCauley
My Submission, “Machine Drawing: Still Life,” responds to the lines in Cezanne’s “Still Life” painting on the west wall of gallery 8. The painting, which Cezanne deepens with color and shading, is flattened in my representation. Even the frame is sewn on the same plane as the image, however it becomes three-dimensional when wrapped around the wooden stretchers. Drawing this piece with the sewing machine balances hand-made error with precise routine. Just like Cezanne’s piece, something is a little off, and it is endeared to the eye as a subjective image. The sewn line pays homage to the outlines in Cezanne’s paintings. Hard to notice at first glance, there is a thin black line which outlines each form in his still life. It focuses the forms, and sets each piece of fruit out from the sheet or table behind it. I use the outline to render form on raw canvas and imply wisps of something there, like a sewn memory of the famous artist’s hand. Finally, color is added, the shades of yellow, orange, blue, and green which tie this painting to the others on the wall of Barnes’ ensemble.

Meg McCauley has lived in Philadelphia since summer 2017. She is a musician, visual artist, and designer. She has a BA in Visual Arts and Art History from Fordham University, and was awarded the 2017 James Storey Award for artistic excellence. McCauley has worked with graphite, paint, soft sculpture, and digital art, but is now working on a series of Machine Drawings like the one submitted to Let's Connect. If selected for residency, she will continue to work on these drawings for exhibition.

Website

Paul Cézanne. Still Life (Nature morte). BF910


Timothy Gierschick II. Flower Pieced. #1057
Timothy Gierschick II




Website

Marsden Hartley. Flowerpiece. BF2072


Sean Martorana. The Raven in the Larkspur. #1208
Sean Martorana
Finding time to participate in a project that is not directly supporting my art as a living is difficult. I rarely participate in anything that doesn’t support that, but this is surprisingly different. I’ve been talking a lot about how there’s a big disconnect between artists that live here in Philly and the art institutions that exist here. With Let’s Connect I see an institution looking to change this in a way designed to benefit both the artists and the institution. For the Barnes, I see a great way to build new audiences by using the art community to spread interest in the museum. The Barnes will sell more tickets and can prove that donations made are going to important programs that are visibly measured. For the artists, it's a chance to react to artists that we have admired looked up to and learned from for so long. Beyond free entry to the museum, moving forward I would like to see the value increased for the artists involved either financially or through measurable exposure or other value-based trade. I chose “Bird Facing Right” because its subject of an animal and foliage relates a lot to what I am doing with my artwork today. I was also intrigued that the artist and information about this piece are unknown. Even with the unknown, I can feel the energy that the artist was putting a lot of themselves into it being free with interpretation, colors & style. I took the basic structure of the piece and put myself into it. The Raven and the Larkspur are symbols of the month July, the month I was born. I feel the artist was painting this for themselves, so I painted this piece as a reflection of myself.

My artwork reveals the energy that lies beneath the surface of my subjects and shows how that energy connects all things and beings. In my work, I deconstruct the human and animal form, elements of nature, machines, and physical existence. I transform familiar subjects into conceptual representations, coursing with the energy and emotion that I believe are living beneath the surface of everything I see. I explore my distinct style on two-dimensional surfaces as well as with jewelry and clothing designs, interiors, large-scale multi-media installations, and experience design. The possible applications of my work are undefined due to my desire to experiment endlessly with new subjects and media in a distinct style. - Sean Martorana

Website

Unidentified artist. Bird Facing Right. BF2083


Catherine Schmitt. Storage Jar & Design. #1142
Catherine Schmitt
I was immediately attracted to the idea of exploring the Barnes Collection with the possibility of it inspiring a work. The fact that the collection is based on ensembles and more the forms of the works, rather than the meanings of the art influenced my section of the storage pot by Mary Hestia. I noticed the beauty of the form and the design influenced by nature. My path to this decision was certainly not a direct one. Initially, I walked thru the rooms and focused on individual paintings one at a time, as I was aware the collection contains a lot of very famous artist's paintings. I noted repeated images of horses, water, women, and that there were religious images in almost every room! Also, I looked alot at the two forest pictures by Henri Rousseau titled 'Woman walking in an exotic forest' and 'Monkeys and Parrot in the virgin forest' and these paintings also influenced my work.




Acoma Mary (Mary Histia). Storage Jar. A383


C. Tyler Giesa. Collingswood, New Jersey 2018. #1077
C. Tyler Giesa
I was struck by the portraits of Chaim Soutine. Soutine possessed immediacy, an impasto technique in which he seem to mix the paints on the canvas, as he is painting. There is always conflict within his portraits. These are feelings, reflective of the now of Soutine at this moment. They are as much self portraits as they are portraits of others We live in very impatient and immediate times. The vibrancy of Soutine’s palette,that energy of the perfect moment drew me back to my love of color photography with the Polaroid SX-70 camera. The SX-70 film has always exhibited a strange and mysterious palette - one it seems to choose for each situation, filtering and blending the moment in ways different from the reality you remember. The film has always been special among artists, as the color is superior to other instant films, and the dyes during processing are able to be manipulated. This need to record, to recognize the here with a record of the now reoccurs throughout The Barnes Collection, and our own personal history's. Soutine bodly defaces the picture plane with his name. Utrillo writes where he exactly he is on "Church of Saint-Aignan"(1914). Susan Gray records a lost pastoral New Jersey in cut paper. These artists worked outside the mainstream in their time, and now their ideas are very much ever present. We try to own these moments through whatever method we choose to record it with. We compose and click, paint or film to keep the now closer, personal, and yet universal. We float around the moment, always on the outside of capturing its truth, constructing the best representation we can.

Graduate of Atlanta College of Art May 2000. Born in Devon, Pennsylvania May 24, 1976. I am a illustrator, graphic designer, multimedia artist living in Collingswood, New Jersey.

Website

Chaim Soutine. Young Girl in Red Blouse (La Petite fille en rouge). BF952


Heather Kelly. Frondescence. #1117
Heather Kelly
While exploring the Barnes collection Henri Rousseau’s Woman Walking in an Exotic Forest caught my eye. I will admit it was partially due to the ridiculous nature of this painting. It features a doll like woman “walking” through foliage and flowers that are larger than life. Upon closer evaluation I realized that this painting was sophisticated with regards to the formal elements incorporated. The first of which is its complexity and layering. There appear to be many different elements to this piece, but once it is broken down there are only a few key elements in repetition. Second, despite the rather flat execution, the lines and shape of this piece exude movement. There are many diagonal, and radial lines, going in almost every direction. For my piece, I’ve decided to distill these elements down into a less complex composition and take it into three dimensions. In my search for more information about Rousseau and his work, I discovered that it was unlikely that he studied any of the “exotic” flora that was prominent in his work. In actuality, he drew from the plants he had at home, frequented the botanical garden and read books. I feel as though Henri and I have this methodology in common. For inspiration I turn to the parks of Philadelphia, my own garden, and scientific publications.

I am an artist and a scientist with a firm belief that the two cannot exist without each other. I currently study Art and Design at Community College of Philadelphia where I have excelled at illustrating the natural world and human form as well as translating it into sculpture. I enjoy experimenting with unconventional materials and long walks through the Wissahickon.


Henri Rousseau. Woman Walking in an Exotic Forest (Femme se promenant dans une forêt exotique). BF388


Patricia Renee Thomas. Negrette with a smoke. #1079
Patricia Renee Thomas
Exploring the imagery of blackface, the artist uses it as a form of self-discovery, and self-criticism. She considers the exploitation of the Black body, specifically the over-sexuality of Black women, Black youth, and connects older imagery with today. She challenges the Westernized idealized standard of beauty, the Westernized standard of figure painting, and the history of the use, voyeurism, and exoticism of black bodies in what is now modern-day advertising.

Patricia Renee' Thomas c.1995, is a Philadelphia based painter and drawer that is interested in the process of creating Art while Black, and experiments with the image of blackness in the Jim Crow Era versus the imagery of blackness as we know it currently. Thomas has been published in several Local and international magazines, as well as being featured in London's It's Nice That online publication, and had work displayed throughout Philadelphia and as far as Italy. She has won talent-based scholarships, honors, and awards, and has work included in many private collections including the Smithsonian’s Museum of African American History and Culture.

Website

Pablo Picasso. Young Woman Holding a Cigarette (Jeune femme tenant une cigarette). BF318


Rebecca-Rose. "On Being" (completed version to be delivered Saturday May 5). #1268
Rebecca-Rose
The most poignant experience felt in my review of the Barnes Foundation Collection within all manners and forms of art is that 'Form evolves as life'. Hinges take on animated forms of birds, heads, bodies, and other basic inspirations with stoic, spiritual and humorous resolve and expression. Cezanne's landscapes in particular lay the foundation for me that aligns life, feeling and expression. Extended branches and trees bathe in an atmosphere of color and light that bring life to the trees dialogue about their encounter and experience. Line take on human form, undulating and pulsating in complexes of composition. Color, line, and light become Cazanne's muses for engaging encounter as well as his gateway for dialogue through time. This is the inspiration for my work entitled "On Being". Rebecca-Rose is an artist whose vision is charged by 'the soul's delight in the beauty of art'.

Rebecca-Rose studied art at Carnegie-Mellon University and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art. My first commission in Philadelphia was Community Legal Service Inc. "Mural of History". Then working with architects from the City of Philadelphia Department of Recreation and the Department of Public Property I completed a series of murals and sculpture. The Brandywine Graphic Workshop selected me as an artist in resident for their CETA program. I was the lead artist for Crisis Intervention Network mural program throughout Philadelphia. In 2015, I coordinated the Neighborhood Time Exchange studio for Mural Arts of Phila and also received LISC creative Placemaking Grant to work with 150 Mantua residents.


Paul Cézanne. Millstone and Cistern under Trees (La Meule et citerne en sous-bois). BF165


Youngkyoung Kim. Pomegranate on the table. #1280
Youngkyoung Kim





Paul Cézanne. Plate of Fruit on a Chair (Assiette de fruits sur une chaise). BF18


Yunkyoung Cho. Village on the Hill. #1279
Yunkyoung Cho





Paul Klee. Village Among Rocks (Ort in Felsen). BF2520


Melissa Mandel. Hillside Barn and Poppies. #1143
Melissa Mandel
Paul Cézanne’s oil painting, Still Life (Nature Morte), is the inspiration for my submission. Still Life forms the centerpiece of the West Wall in Room 8. Each of the wall’s accompanying pieces echo Cézanne’s triangular forms, color palette, soft light, and visible brush strokes. My goal was to draw on these elements and create a fitting visual complement. Triangular shapes figure prominently in Still Life, providing subtle separation and depth. Underscoring this effect, the color palette uses soft blues, purples, pinks, and greens in the background, moving toward warm yellows, oranges, browns, and reds in the draped cloth and backboard. The peaked white cloth in the center of the painting has warm highlights and gray-blue shadows, while the pieces of fruit are painted to highlight their roundness without heavy emphasis on highlights or shadows. To evoke Cézanne’s work in my painting, Hillside Barn and Poppies, I used the same triangular forms as the foundation of my composition. The color placements and palette also recall the colors used in Still Life. The triangular rooftops and barn foundations reflect the white cloth and backboard respectively, while the trees and poppies in the foreground echo Cézanne’s fruit. The plush golden field and tree in the mid-ground parallel Still Life’s bunched golden cloth as it meets the roundness of the pitcher and the bowl. Hillside’s pink, green, and blue mountains recede into the sky, utilizing Cézanne’s background colors and taking on a cloth-like feel to further connect to his work.

Melissa Mandel is a painter who uses complex compositions, vivid colors and contrast to explore the blurred boundaries of realism and abstraction. Her goal is to invite viewers to be participants rather than outside observers. As a survivor of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, she has an intense appreciation of the temporality of life. She feels every moment has the potential to be beautiful, and to capture it in art is to honor the hidden importance of something that will never be the same again: the subject, the light, the weather – all the things that change moment to moment and cannot be replicated. With her artwork she aims to instill a lasting impression of the beauty of nature, reminding the viewer of the importance of choosing to see it.

Website

Paul Cézanne. Still Life (Nature morte). BF910


Irul Abidin . one day in the park. #1133
Irul Abidin





Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Landscape with Figures, near Cagnes (Paysage avec figures, environs de Cagnes). BF257


Kimberly A. Torres. There’s No Home Like You. #1068
Kimberly A. Torres
I’m celebrating my multiracial background, as well as other people who are mixed and biracial. I’m giving us a space where mixed individuals can feel proud, accepted, and acknowledged for who and what they are. My subjects are normal everyday people that are prevalent everywhere. Although people may not be able to identify them instantly, they are still walking among us and still exist in society. I want to give my viewers the ability to see us as people and not just objects of fetishization. By utilizing portraiture and realism, it makes the subject be the focal point of the piece. One aspect of the imagery that I play off the most is the background. By creating a “wallpaper” that is either a symbolic merging of each of our ethnic backgrounds in one image or personalized to the individual subject. This further pushes the narrative that I’m letting each of my subjects say about themselves

Kimberly A. Torres is an Alumni of Moore College of Art & Design with a BFA of Fine Arts. She's a portrait painter who uses herself and others to celebrate racial identity for people coming from a multiracial/Biracial background. Her paintings are meant to represent her subjects in the dignified and respectful manner they deserve. Her interests in photorealism, color, portraiture, Northern Baroque and Italian Renaissance work are what’s influencing the use of portraiture in her work.

Website

Amedeo Modigliani. Redheaded Girl in Evening Dress (Jeune fille rousse en robe de soir). BF206


Woman Life. My Peace. #1255
Woman Life
When I entered into the Barnes Foundation, that was my first time inside of art gallery of any kind. My heart was racing and my palms were sweaty. I was quickly greeted by a lovely woman who could tell I was nervous. She asked one question, "which medium do you like?". I was unable to reply and felt embarrassed by not knowing what she meant. I replied, "I'm new to the art world. I'm self taught." I wanted to hang my head as if ashamed of my truth. She smiled, looked at me and said "let's look at some other self taught artist!" As we walked around the rooms, she pointed out more self taught artist than I could ever imagine, Van Guagh being the most noted name I knew. Then we arrived to the works of Horace Pippin. His piece "Christ and the woman of Samaria" captured my heart. It was more than the image of Christ, it was the saturation of colors. The way the black leaves lift from the canvas. I couldn't help but notice how vibrant the colors were and how well the painting was put together. She explained his story and I knew his work was his peace. It was his peace of mind. The time he used to create instead of destroy. His time to make beauty instead of destruction. A mind that has seen war, understands like minds. Although I am no Horace Pippin, I understand the effects war have on a person. I am thankful for witnessing the "Christ and the woman of Samaria" by Horace Pippin, it allowed me to find "My Peace" within the world of wood.

Aysha, a.k.a. Woman Life, is a Philadelphia native who has traveled the world during her military affiliation and career. Woman Life, which means Aysha, is a wife, mother, and disabled veteran. After serving in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) 09-10, she sustained injuries which left her using a walker, cane, and frequently using a wheelchair. The injuries ended her career, but where the beginning of a long journey. Once being diagnosed with PTSD, anxiety, and seizure disorder, Woman Life set out to find a healthier way to live. Winter of 2015, Woman Life attended an art gala featuring rising Philadelphia artist Iamintisar. This launched the self taught artist to heal her mind, body, and soul with art with the desire to heal others.


Horace Pippin. Christ and the Woman of Samaria. BF986


Elmi L. Ventura Mata. A family of color at the kitchen table in the United States of America.. #1201
Elmi L. Ventura Mata
The work investigates oil paint’s historical power as a tool of representation. My paintings challenge the Eurocentrism embedded within the history and tradition of painting. Family members, many who came to the U. S. illegally and are first generation immigrants populate my canvases. When living in times of political strife and urgency, it is fundamental voicing the concerns of a marginalized population. Power in representation lies its celebration of one’s livelihood. The work provides a point of dialogue; for communication is key in building understanding across cultural and social barriers. Born in El Salvador, I was raised by my Grandmother until age eight. Then I immigrated illegally, twice and alone, to the U.S. before joining my parents, who soon separated. Feeling the wrath of abandonment at an early age, gave me the grit necessary to survive the unforgiving urban environment of Elizabeth, N.J. Adopting a new cultural identity is psychologically and emotionally deteriorating. The axis between suffering, pain and self-empowerment informs my paintings. Hard work is integral to my practice. Knowing that my father sweats for his bread and butter on a daily basis forces me to directly approach the act of painting as a prerogative. Only hard work can justify my life choice to paint. Work narratives are told through the depiction of family members that possess large hands, symbols of manual labor and the hard work. Ink on paper.

Elmi L. Ventura Mata was born in Chilanga, El Salvador. At the age of 8, he immigrated to the United States. His love for painting blossomed while growing up in Elizabeth, New Jersey from 2001 to 2012. In 2016 he earned a double major in painting and drawing from the Cleveland Institute of Art. Upon completing his undergraduate studies, he enrolled at the Tyler School of Art, where he expects to graduate in 2018 with an MFA in painting.

Website

Horace Pippin. Giving Thanks. BF990


Evan Greensweig. the Burning of the Library of Alexandria. #1108
Evan Greensweig
The piece I chose to emulate was Henri Matisse's Dishes and Melon (Assiettes et melon). What struck me most about this piece was it's compositionally, namely how Matisse uses color in relation to shape in order to portray a dreamlike scene of mundane human(less) space without the material confines of rigid limiters such as walls. Differences in angle within the background delineate themselves as warmth moves from one end (the open window (moderately cool)) to the far right (deep warm oranges shadowed with some darker pigment). I chose to highlight the transfer of warmth through color in a literal way by imaging the right side of the kitchen as engulfed in flame, charred, and reaching through amorphous arms of smoke through the open window into the grey outside air. I imagined the right side of the kitchen with arms of smoke as an embodiment of hell, the triangular table with crooked legs bridging the two domains. The miasma and frenzy of the right side spreads from an overturned candle in the bottom right corner, a mundane and fixture of human life carelessly left to engulf the serenity, memory, and knowledge of this place in the absence of those who dwell within it.

I'm a self taught artist from the Philadelphia area that specializes in mixed media painting. I employ seriality, highlight architectural simplicity, and enjoy bringing to waking world the often piecemeal, whimsical, and chaotic nature of dream.

Website

Henri Matisse. Dishes and Melon (Assiettes et melon). BF64


Marian Howard . May 1, 2018- Philadelphia Chinese Lantern Festival. #1261
Marian Howard


I am a lens-based media artist. My studio practice was established in a traditional black and white photography darkroom. Currently, my art work focuses on exploring the potential of the two-dimensional image through the materiality of the Polaroid emulsion. My subject matter concentrates on human interaction with the environment, public or private. For me, the discovery of these complex and compelling latent images, viewed on a tactile substrate, prompts an emotion and reveals the essence of what it means to be human within the context of our technological culture.

Website

Henri Edmond Cross. Two Women by the Shore, Mediterranean. BF436


Scott J Porcelli. John Coltrane Performs Greatest Hits. #1091
Scott J Porcelli
Charles Demuth's watercolors have a playfulness and spirit that I've always been attracted to especially with the circus themed pieces. My illustrative work tends to depict whimsical and humorous scenes inspired by pop culture pairing images of musicians, celebrities, and historical figures in playful scenarios. Being familiar with Demuth's larger body of work I like that these works are not obsessively labored and feel more spontaneous. I was attracted to unusual perspective of "Two Trapeze Artist's in Red", and responding to the foreshortened figures, the movement, and the simple arc of the composition. My piece incorporates the Jazz Icon John Coltrane performing "My Favorite Things" mid air with a Trapeze acrobat. I wanted to use a historical figure from Philadelphia and after seeing Demuth's "Musician" in the Barnes Collection I immediately thought of Coltrane.

Scott Porcelli is a printmaking instructor and product coordinator at the Center for Creative Works a studio for adults with intellectual disabilities. He is a collaborator and former studio manager at Second State Press. Scott Porcelli holds an MFA in printmaking from Edinboro University of PA.

Website

Charles Demuth. Two Trapeze Performers in Red. BF644


Samuel J. Solomon. Bay Scene. #1150
Samuel J. Solomon
My work tends to examine the creation of community. I visualize this idea through the use of collaged imagery and reconstruction of fractured images. Through re-assemblage of differing subject matter, I hope to relay the uniqueness that is a tight-knit, diverse space.

Samuel J Solomon is an artist and teacher who has lived throughout the Midwest, Northern Japan, and most recently, Philadelphia. He is a printmaker primarily, with illustrative and sculptural work in his repertoire.

Website

Jean Hugo. Boat under Construction (Tréboul). BF1139


Kemeys Goethe. Hey Thank . #1149
Kemeys Goethe




Website

Jean Hugo. Boat under Construction (Tréboul). BF1139


Henry Martin, Francisco de Goya, Thomas Eakins. Dogs Chasing a Cat on a Man on a Donkey. #1154
Henry Martin, Francisco de Goya, Thomas Eakins
I am currently working on a series examining Thomas Eakin's use of Goya's Black Paintings as a reference for "The Gross Clinic". With respect to "Let's Connect" and the Barnes Foundation I specifically wanted to examine if and how any of Goya's works in the collection display formal or structural similarities to the Eakins' painting. In so doing, I immediately discovered that "Dogs Chasing a Cat on a Man on a Donkey" and "The Gross Clinic" both share a dominant triangular construction, and a similar frenzy in the interlocking of dark and light masses. In addition, the ridgeline in the background of the Goya drawing even tilts at the same angle as the thigh on the operating table in Eakins' masterpiece. In effect, I am applying Barnes' method of artistic analysis and comparison to Philadelphia's most iconic painting. If awarded this residency I hope to use the time in order to finish this series.

I studied painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the University of Pennsylvania from 1986-1994, after which I painted in Spain for two years, living in Madrid. My professional career spans the last twenty years in Philadelphia, focusing on landscape; gallery affiliations include F.A.N. Gallery, Somerville Manning in Delaware, and Chestnut Hill Gallery. My work is in collections containing works of Anselm Kiefer, Kathe Kollwitz, Edward Willis Redfield, and Gilbert Stuart. I hold classes and workshops privately, through the Main Line Art Center and Morris Arboretum, and I continue to paint in my Mt. Airy studio. My current series explores Eakins' use of Goya's Black Paintings as a reference point in "The Gross Clinic".

Website

Francisco de Goya. Dogs Chasing a Cat on a Man on a Donkey. BF689.1


Andrea Walls. Container for Holy Relics. #1103
Andrea Walls
Though I appreciate Albert Barnes' democratic approach to art and art appreciation and though I admire his capacity to see and uplift African Art as a highly evolved aesthetic practice, I am responding to his over-arching, paternalistic and capitalist penchant for acquiring indigenous art to collect and display in ways that are inconsistent with the purposes and context for which they were created and used. Although the artifacts themselves may be encased, the spirits within shall never be contained...

Andrea “Philly” Walls is a poet and self-taught digital artist. She is the author of the chapbook, Ultraviolet Catastrophe, (Thread Makes Blanket Press, 2011) and the creator of www.theblackbodycurve.com, an interactive poetry and digital arts collection, which is an extended meditation on the May 13, 1985 bombing of 6221 Osage Avenue, a desecrated landscape in her West Philadelphia neighborhood. She is a Pushcart Prize in Poetry nominee and a recipient of a Leeway Art and Social Change Grant. She is currently working with a collective of 10 brilliant women through PPAC’s Women’s Mobile Museum, a yearlong photography and media arts apprenticeship. Andrea lives and makes art in Philadelphia.

Website

Unidentified artist. Sculptural Element from a Reliquary Ensemble. A268


Andrew Russel Andruss. Untitled. #1249
Andrew Russel Andruss
Plants, birds and patterns. These are the things I instantly gravitated to in the Barnes Collection. They are also the elements I would focus on in the residency, should I be so fortunate. The terrifying and compelling Henri Rousseau paintings feel particularly relevant to our current socio-political climate; I also like the way he painted plants. The many paintings of birds in the style of PA German “distlefinks” have attracted me since childhood, and I’ve periodically drawn my own. But it was the earthenware collection on the lower level that I knew I would choose for my submission piece. The c. 1910 water pot I reference has a very pleasing “modernist” general composition — simple patterns, contrast, muted tones, obvious handwork — and informed my choice to work on an extra deep panel and use matte vinyl paint on bare wood. The repeating forms I painted remind me of Rousseau’s ominous subjects: jungle leaves, teeth, claws; and also of bird wings, beaks and tails. Should I have the privilege of being awarded the Barnes residency, I already know how I would make use of the pavilion: fill it with large green tropical houseplants (preferably in collaboration with a local nursery) and make relevant abstract paintings on panels, canvases, built wooden plant containers/structures, and at least one piece of furniture. It would be both a working studio and an installation inspired by the Barnes collection and the spectacular landscaped grounds surrounding the property. Please accept my sincere thanks for this opportunity, and for the hard work and consideration of all involved.

Andrew Russel Andruss drew cars, houses and schematics of complex underground habitats below Snoopy’s doghouse during a bucolic childhood on a small farm in rural PA until he was directed away from art by the practical powers that be and entered university as an architectural engineering major, got bored, joined a fraternity, and ultimately graduated with a degree in pre-med. The ensuing onus of a medical career drove Andrew to instead pursue furniture design — a decidedly better application of his interests and heritage (lapsed PA Dutch) — at the Rhode island School of Design, where he didn’t make much furniture. Now Andrew contemplates humor, feeling, and the paradoxical nature of reality, but mostly just paints. And tends to houseplants.

Website

Unidentified maker. Water Jar. A347


Keisha Whatley, Custom Arts Studio. Picasso in Color. #1096
Keisha Whatley, Custom Arts Studio
“I am going to make everything around me beautiful; that will be my life.” This quote, by Elise de Wolfe, resonates with me on a very visceral level and greatly informs my work. "Picasso in Color" is very much informed by my personal experience as an African & Indigenous American. Picasso's "Head of a Woman" intrigued me and inspired me to ponder the question, "What would this portrait look like if Picasso selected a more culturally diverse subject, a black woman, even? As the body of black women as subject has been historically exploited, devalued and abused, how would the abstract style and the idea of deconstructing her face take shape? Finding beauty in even the hard to reach places is my passion; reflecting it for the world to see and experience is my mission. I often consider the viewers' visceral response a part of the work itself. While the colors and design of "Picasso in Color" are inviting, looking closer, there is an underlying story that unfolds. While black women are often looked at, we are not often seen beyond one dimension: our hair, our makeup, our "design". The glossy shadows on the chest and neck are meant to draw the eye to the seemingly empty cavern within demonstrating that the many layers of black women are rarely sought out and explored by others. The 3 gashes across her chest depict her emotional pain behind her beautiful face. Making everything beautiful comes in many shapes, sizes and colors. Truth is beautiful. Honesty is beautiful... even when it hurts.

Keisha Whatley is a Philadelphia artist who grew up in West Philadelphia. A graduate of the High School for the Creative and Performing Arts, Keisha excelled at the drawing and painting discipline going on to study at Parsons School of Design (NY), The School of Visual Arts (NY) and The Art Institute of Philadelphia (PA). Using her creativity as the main ingredient, her work aims to create something aesthetically beautiful while challenging viewers to question beliefs, inherent biases and the need for compassion in everyday life. She started Custom Arts Studio, LLC, a full service visual arts business, in 2014.

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Pablo Picasso. Head of a Woman (Tête de femme). BF421


A.V. Rankin. The (8 months pregnant) Painter in Front of Her Canvas . #1112
A.V. Rankin
Most of my work deals with visually mapping a specific time and place, sometimes literally, and other times more metaphorically or poetically. I was struck by and instantly connected with Honore Daumier's humble little self portrait, placed at the periphery of one of Dr. Barnes' ensembles. Wanting to portray a similar sense of intimate poignancy, I first tried painting a similar self portrait from life. But my heavily pregnant body looked comical and unlikely when translated to my usual art medium. So I chose the more modern approach of photography, concluding that is reflected our contemporary times, when a woman can continue to pursue a career in the arts even while expecting and raising a family.

An Uruguayan American artist based in Philadelphia, Ana Vizcarra Rankin has exhibited extensively throughout the US and received various awards. A.V. Rankin holds an MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and a BA in art history from Temple University. Her work resides in international, public, corporate and private collections, including the Brandywine River Museum of Art permanent collection and the Uruguayan Foundation for the Arts.

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Honoré Daumier. The Painter in Front of His Painting (Le Peintre devant son tableau). BF1184


Bhavisha Patel. Elephant in Urban Jungle. #1189
Bhavisha Patel
It is a good painting day, when instead of objectifying my subject, I notice the harmony that exists in the different elements in nature, and remember that I too am a part of that nature. When this happens I try capturing the emotion as best I can. It is a good painting day, when I paint what I love to paint, like snow, whether it is falling, on the ground, on the trees, melting or sitting on bicycles. I especially love the structure and dark metal of the bicycle with the gentle snow. It is always a good painting day, when I paint elephants, because I love elephants for too many reasons to note here. In fact I paint elephants when I feel I have a painter’s block. At the moment I am enjoying painting African elephants in urban scenes. It carries many different interpretations. It could be the unspoken but known thing. Maybe it is the symbol of a major political party. Or, it’s a subject that makes someone smile and laugh and think of circus animals. For me, it is a part of nature, the same way we are part of nature, and so we need to protect them, especially when some of us covet their tusks. As much as people are in and a part of the luscious and exotic forests in Henri Rousseau’s paintings, so are the animals that we do not see everyday, part of our world.

Bhavisha transitions from nature to urban scenes creating paintings that carry a romantic, nostalgic feel. Her work aims to evoke feelings of peace and tranquility, paintings that a viewer can walk into and feel the calm offered in everyday ordinary views. Her subject matter and style carry influences of several continents. Indian by ethnicity, born and brought up in Kenya, educated in England, and now living in Philadelphia, her art spans from landscapes of the African Savannah, to Urban Cityscapes, and Design Art with Indian motifs. A self–taught artist, she paints in a representational style, primarily using oil paints and often creates a body of work on a specific theme. Bicycles in snowy cityscapes, African grey elephants, Buddhas on

Website

Henri Rousseau. Woman Walking in an Exotic Forest (Femme se promenant dans une forêt exotique). BF388


Shana Roberts. Mustafah. #1104
Shana Roberts


Shana-Adina Roberts is an artist from West Philadelphia. She is a multi-disciplined artist who continuously explores and discovers new ways to express herself. Her work moves from the figurative to the avant-garde. For Shana, creating is naturally who she is, and has always been. Her anxiety and paranoia influences her work. She is an artist who is interested in creating art that speaks to her experience and can speak for her.

Website

Unidentified artist. Mask: Portrait of a Bearded Man (Mblo). A141


SKOVeS (Sammy Kovnat). Reclining Nude (I Paid Him In Chicken). #1075
SKOVeS (Sammy Kovnat)
The piece that I have created responds to Van Gogh's painting Reclining Nude (Jan-Mar 1887) through subject, color, and backstory. I initially fell in love with the piece because it was my first time seeing a woman with armpit hair shown proudly in a gallery of impressionist works (and so many soft nudes). This piece inspired me to create a reclining nude of a friend who navigates the world with a style and aesthetic charm unto his own. Similarly to the rumored prostitute that Van Gogh had paid to sit for him because it was all that he could afford, my friend is not the kind of person represented on gallery walls and I paid my friend in chicken, a due that is referenced by the inclusion of his red "wing king" necklace around his neck. I feel that Van Gogh's work represented a person working with what little they had (and fighting through mental health problems) in order to create beauty, and I find that to be something that resonates deeply among myself and so many of my peers trying our best to navigate within today's turbulent political and socio economic landscape. I also utilized the technique of painting on the back of glass (plexiglass), one used by a handful of artists within the Barnes collection that truly blew me away and pushed me outside of my creative comfort zone.

SKOVeS is a multimedia art experimentalist, navigating materials and subjects with empathy, integrity, and earnest. She is passionate about breaking plates, beeswax, and all things warm.

Website

Vincent van Gogh. Reclining Nude (Femme nue étendue sur un lit). BF720


Carrieanne Shimborski. Peske Pete’s Portrait. #1106
Carrieanne Shimborski


Carrie Anne Shimborski is a Philadelphia native, abstract painter, Master doodler, and an emerging photographer. Inspired by the loss of her brother to a herion overdose in 2015, Carrie Anne focuses on the "forgotten in Philadelphia" with special attention given to those suffering from addiction and to the city's homeless. Throughout her work, Carrie Anne seeks to capture the "raw, real, and present emotion" of the individual so that they can remember what they were going through at that very moment in their life. As a self-taught artist, Carrie Anne has created numerous pieces of artwork, however, one of her greatest creations thus far, is the light of her life, Luca!


Corneille de Lyon. Portrait of a Man. BF774


Jeremy Saltry. Break Table, Mid-Day. #1116
Jeremy Saltry
Dr. Albert Barnes was known for more than just art. His invention of Argyrol, a silver based antiseptic, was produced at his factory which at the time was eight rooms rented within the Hotel Powelton on 40th and Filbert Street in Philadelphia, Pennnsylvania. This is where Dr. Barnes harbored a progressive and racially diverse work environment not only allowing employees to learn about art while still on the company's clock, essentially paying for their education, but also created an integrated factory more than 50 years ahead of the civil rights movement. He was known for helping people from low income backgrounds such as factory workers and starving artists. Much like the work that Dr. Barnes collected, this submission will be part of a larger series, focusing on a post-impressionistic view of manufacturing in Philadelphia and was partly inspired by Vincent van Gogh's The Factory within The Barnes Foundations Collection. With this residency I intend to explore the relationship between Dr. Barnes, manufacturing and Post-Impressionism with the use of natural light and 35mm film. This submission is self-developed with chemistry sourced and mixed by hand. Several of the components within this film and development process share components with Argyrol, which Dr. Barnes created in 1899.

Jeremy Saltry is originally from Northeastern Pennsylvania. His experiences growing up in an area based on industry have inspired much of his work which involves creating a perspective from within blue collar life on analog formats, focusing on color in otherwise grey areas. His background as a documentary filmmaker has given him a unique multi-disciplinary approach to fine art combining social commentaries with the use of natural lighting and color within art forward 35mm film photography. Within his search between the relationship of light and film, Jeremy creates his own color development chemicals and processes all of his photographs by hand.

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Vincent van Gogh. The Factory. BF303


Carole Loeffler. expectations. #1113
Carole Loeffler
"Expectations" is a part of my ongoing text and vintage textile series that are a reaction to the post-election, toxic political environment that is enveloping the United States and the world. The series of works are an attempt to creatively process what it means to be a woman, be married to a family of immigrants and try to raise kind, thoughtful children in a world that feels upside down and inside out. My response to Mildred Murphy Dillon's "Yes! Madame" is one of "getting into" the mind of the models and artist. I am interested in using text that is dialectical - that can refer to the subject, the artist and the viewer with opposing viewpoints and concepts. The word "expectations" is meant to bring forth the idea that we each have expectations for ourselves and for others based on a variety of gender and class based assumptions (among others). The use of vintage domestic textiles help place the word "expectations" in context and offer additional layers of meaning. The hand-cut felt lettering offers a hint of my hand. It is important to me that the work feel handmade because the act of using these materials is considered traditional "womens work". I want viewers to know that there is a human behind the creation of this work, not a machine. In addition to the use of material, the text is placed in a composition that mimics the contours of the women in the original piece. The "P" is the woman all the way on the left, the "O" is the woman 2nd from right and the "S" is the woman standing up on the right side of the original composition.

Carole Loeffler is a native of New Jersey and received her B.F.A. from Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University and her M.F.A. from University of South Florida in Tampa. She is the Chair of the Department of Visual and Performing Arts at Arcadia University in Glenside, PA and teaches Sculpture and coordinates the Foundations program. Carole has had numerous solo and group exhibitions in Philadelphia, New York, the Midwest, Northeast and the Southern United States. She spent over 10 years investigating the color red through a variety of abstract sculptural approaches. She is now utilizing found vintage textiles with text to examine what it means to be a woman in our culture.

Website

Mildred Murphy Dillon. Yes! Madame. BF2088


Elissa Glassgold. The Ancestors. #1098
Elissa Glassgold
I have a strong interest in portraiture, though my own works in that mode are invented, imagined characters. To me, these artworks allow a form of travel to that hour or day when the work of art is being created. The people in these images are in tandem with sensations that are peculiar to their own times, and I wonder at the high collars or the voluminous dresses that decorate or encase their figures. It is always curious to me, how different human cultures rearrange themselves to be seen by others, though ultimately they all seem to fall into one pattern of "belonging" in a particular way. The pattern I call "new child" as the archetype of hope, ubiquitously stands at the center of many group portraits. The infant or child in these pictures absorbs most of the attention, might be a future saint, or the one who is expected to carry familial recollections forward...to the next new child, and the next. The mystery of what happened next, as the stories of the characters unfolded beyond that day of being set down on canvas is fascinating to me. Renoir's paintings, celebratory and sympathetic to women and children, is my inspiration for the work I am proposing. I would like to create a large tiled work that incorporates the basic characters in this work, while exploring the clothing/design significance of women and children in family portraits. It will be made of paper clay, painted, and sealed with cold wax. I would create a large tile mural, with the intention of adding invented, perhaps symbolic figures added as my own narrative unfolds.

Education: The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, BFA from The University of the Arts, MFA from UNC at Chapel Hill in 1980. I have exhibited my work in group and solo shows. (The Philadelphia Art Alliance,Philadelphia Museum of Art/Fleisher Art Memorial,Delaware Art Museum, Rosemont College, New Jersey State College, Noyes Museum, and was represented by The Charles More Gallery. I was an early founder of Nexus Gallery, Philadelphia. I taught Life Drawing and Painting from 1981 until 2010. I was a full time adjunct instructor of Art and Art History at Temple and Rutgers Universities. I taught elementary art, and concurrently was a designer for the Toy Industry... 1993-2014, exhibiting these works internationally.

Website

Pierre-Auguste Renoir. The Artist's Family (La Famille de l'artiste). BF819


Michael Morgan. Living Brick. #1177
Michael Morgan
As I said in my Bio, I am a brick sculptor. I use the humble everyday brick, an object more commonly associated with utilitarian structures, to make art. The Barnes Museum has always fascinated me because of the way Barnes chose to exhibit utilitarian objects to point to features in what would normally be classed as "High Art". I have chosen "The Ruffian" by Matisse, because although this is a still portrait of a seated man, Matisse has endowed it with a menacing liveliness through his use of brush strokes and color. In my piece, "Living Brick" I have presented this figure within the still framework of the brick, yet its lively nature is interpreted sculpturally. The head is separated from the body, emphasizing Barnes' addition of the 17th century hinge above the painting, which relates strongly to the head of the figure. Ultimately, I am melding the two defining features of the Barnes collection, Fine Art and Craft.

I am a brick sculptor. For me, using this humble everyday material to create public art can be a good vehicle for metaphor, mainly because of its accessibility to a wide audience. Functional and semi-functional elements are an integral part of my sculpture, I don’t view them as an impediment to the artistic form, rather they drive it to become more when human involvement is present. I have received grants and awards from the Clay Studio, University of Nebraska, Nebraska Arts Council and The Bader Fund. Although I have taken part in a number of exhibitions, my work is mainly commission based. My work has been featured in American Craft, Ceramics Monthly, Landscape Architecture and Rockland Magazine. Some of my major commissions are; “

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Henri Matisse. Seated Riffian (Le Rifain assis). BF264


Tash Billington. Three Brothers . #1105
Tash Billington


Tash Billington is a Philadelphia native who uses art as a way to heal, motivate and give back to under served communities. Tash specializes in visual art, spoken word and community engagement. She is best known for assisting on large-scale public mural projects. She can often be seen operating boom lifts or maintaining a smooth flow during community paint days. Her motto is to enlighten, inspire and elevate. She is currently doing an apprenticeship with the Women's Mobile Museum at Phila Photo Arts.


Henri Matisse. Three Sisters with an African Sculpture (Les Trois sœurs à la sculpture africaine). BF363


Constance Brady. Horsepower. #1281
Constance Brady
With this artwork I am addressing the controversial departures from two of Dr. Barnes’ bylaws. In his rigorous charter, Dr. Barnes stipulated that the artworks never be moved from the Merion galleries and he forbade color reproduction of his collection. I have effectively “destroyed” a color photograph of one Barnes’ signature ensembles now housed in Philadelphia, appreciating an aesthetic philosophy of an imperfect and transient beauty that values roughness, economy, and simplicity. The centerpiece of my image/artwork is a lidded round box from Ancient Greece. This Attic pyxis, an archaeological remain excavated from a grave dating back to 750 B.C., is arguably the most storied artifact in gallery number 17 and perhaps the entire Barnes collection. So why does it remain without an accession number? As the story goes, and so one of the helpful and informed docents will tell you- in 1952, one year after Barnes’ death, this artifact and the glass cabinet in which it was displayed, mysteriously shattered. It was taken off view and lost to storage for over 50 years only to be introduced in 2013 at the Barnes Philadelphia location. Do the four awkward horses bedecking the pyxis symbolize its original owners social standing or the imminence of destruction? Could these harbingers of doom possibly portend the polarizing debate that would eventually embroil the Barnes Foundation?

Constance (b. Wilmington, DE) moved to Brooklyn, New York in 1997 where she earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Pratt Institute and at Columbia University studied Advanced Clinical Social Work. For two years Constance trained as a member of a multi-disciplinary ambulatory treatment team in a community-based outpatient acute services unit as a Behavioral Health Fellow in the Department of Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine. Her pursuit of painting has been lauded as "constant and profound" by Curator Ernesto Pujol who describes Constance's approach ”she pushes her painting medium, sampling from its rich historical archive". Recognized as one of the world's top graffiti writers by Publisher's Weekly, Ms. Brady's works have been exhibited

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Henri Matisse. Figure with Bouquet. BF980


Astia . Green Screen Queen of Dreams. #1194
Astia





Karl Priebe. Miss Chalfont. BF1144


Geeta N. Ahya. Two Trees in the City. #1230
Geeta N. Ahya
I am a self-taught artist. I do abstract art using computer software Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. Often I don't set out to create an image about a subject or theme in my mind. MY image constantly evolves as I create new images and also manipulate already created images. Adobe Photoshop provides many tools to create shapes, patterns, styles etc. I create new colors mixing layers of different colors, gradients. I create new brushes to use with the beautiful colors. I enjoy creating new shapes using tools like transform and filter. Then I fill the shapes with patterns and colors . I use vibrant contrasting colors as they complement each other. Post-impressionist painter Paul Cezanne's landscape pictures are most beautiful with tones of greens and beautiful bright blues. The picture that inspired me "Rocks and Trees" shows many tones of green and blue with some shades of orange/mustard in the center around the two trees elevates the value of the trees. The trees are "live", contrasted by surrounding rocks which are inanimate objects. The picture is set in rural area of France. Cezanne painted pictures with patchworks of colors and strong brushstrokes. Emergence of cubist style is visible in the picture. Unlike Cezanne, I have used many different bright colors in my image of "Two Trees in the City". The trees here (in the city) are surrounded by many man-made things like blocks, fences, walls, buildings, cemented steps, monuments. The two beautiful trees bring nature to the city.

Geeta is a self-taught artist. She was exposed to Adobe software in her profession of designing websites. Geeta has many years of experience in Information Technology field and have strong passion to learn something new. So naturally She has many hobbies. Working with yarn and experimenting with spices and ingredients in the kitchen are two of them. She has lived in Philadelphia over ten years.


Paul Cézanne. Rocks and Trees (Rochers et arbres). BF286


Ryne Fuller. Her Long Back Stare. #1215
Ryne Fuller
I chose Angelo Pinto’s oil painting “Two Figures” as the point of reference for creating my work. In Pinto’s painting I felt a sense of distance and silence in the figures and overall composition. Even though the colors are bright and there is a musician present, the looseness of the painting evokes a sense of stillness to me. The facial and body expressions of the figures are blurred and therefore don’t convey an exact sense of emotion to the viewer. I took that feeling of distance and stillness and created a more literal sense of space in my composition. The face of the figure in the foreground is defined yet still ambiguous. That figure, paired with the woman in the window with her back to the viewer, allows for a narrative to unfold that can be interpreted in several ways. Additionally, I couldn’t resist picking from the colors of Angelo’s work. In my work I used the brightness and energy of the colors to balance an otherwise open and silent painting. Lastly, I didn’t feel that there was strong source of light in Pinto’s work. In contrast to this with I used a singular and direct light source, creating more dramatic effect in the narrative.

Ryne Fuller was born in Illinois in 1985. He currently works and lives in Philadelphia, PA. Painting is his primary focus now. In 2015 Ryne finished his undergraduate with a BFA in Illustration at the University of the Arts but he has since set course upon a career in the contemporary art world. Through his work Ryne is able to connect with both himself and the outside world. He moves to go full on into the gamut of our lives and experiences as human beings past, present, and future. Ultimately Ryne wants to share stories and feelings that can connect and link up into the greater world.  There are unseen things and unseen places. It is Ryne’s desire to make these things and places seen.

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Angelo Pinto. Two Figures. BF1147


Michelle Brown. Madras . #1035
Michelle Brown
I have always been a Creative spirit, I came to the Earth that way. I was very inspired by my mother, a very eccentric and Creative free spirit. I was drawn to my magic ability to create something out or nothing. My desire to make art my career led me to Philadelphia where I briefly attended Moore Coolege of Art and The Academy of Arts. I created MellonHeadDesigns my line of hand painted Home Decor and Children specialty clothing.In 1995 I was featured in The Philadelphia Inquire magazine section "Finding Furnishings" 1997 "A matter of aesthetic standards, 2003 "A Brush That's Brash". In November of 2017 I participated in BMWs Supports Sustainable Designers at Citi Field in New York City. I continue to find new ways to play and create. My newest creation MMichelle Sustainable Ethical Fashion allows me to educate and create Fashion consciously. My love of antique textiles from around the world are put to good use in combination wth Vintage Redesigned and Original Designs. I believe Sustainable Fashion is the Future educating the public on how much damage Fast fashion is doing to our environment is important. Raising awareness on the subject mass production vs locally hand made.

In 1992 I began my professional career as a multi medium artist.I say multi medium because there are so many mediums I can't resist, I absolutely love to paint and sew on just about every surface, from hand painted pottery, painted furniture, painted shoes, paintings, interior decorative painting,painted bodies, painted clothing, painted home accessories and Sustainable Fashion. After leaving Moore College of Art, I created MellonHeadDesigns my line of home Decor. Mellon Head Is all about Bright happy colors and quality craftsmanship. My Coloful brightly painted ceramic dishes. Eight years ago my love of designing clothing became my new canvas, MMichelle Sustainable Ethical Fashion was born. I have created a Lifestyle out of my creativi.


Henri Matisse. Red Madras Headdress (Le Madras rouge). BF448


Liz Rosenberg . Two Friends. #1240
Liz Rosenberg
This painting is a response to Tintoretto’s wonderful painting “Two Apostles” in which two men, their heads almost touching, are engaged in an earnest and private discussion. The mood is established with color, composition, their serious expressions and their body language. They are beautifully rendered. My painting isn’t an imitation but an homage. These two modern friends are just as serious as Tintoretto’s apostles. Their body language is similar, their eyes look down, one grips his beer bottle and the other ignores his glass of wine. Tintoretto famously said, “You can never do too much drawing.” My painting, like the original, demonstrates drawing in paint, although not the drafting skill or the magnificent brushwork of Tintoretto’s original.

I live and paint in the West Mount Airy section of Philadelphia. I settled here while studying literature at Temple University. Just in the last few years I’ve been able to return to making art, after years in the corporate world. I’ve been fortunate to be able to study with and learn from wonderful and gifted artists at local schools including PAFA and Fleisher. I look for the beauty in small things and try to capture what is visible and what is not. I paint mostly in oils and pastels. Every painting is a unique look at the world of light and color. Finding beauty in lines, patterns, colors, nature, the human form, light and paint is exciting. I try to convey that excitement through my art.

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Tintoretto (Jacopo Robusti). Two Apostles. BF807


Amy Wilson. Studio with Books. #1212
Amy Wilson
I was drawn to Matisse’s Studio with Goldfish for its dramatic contrast of light and dark, and for its luminescent color, since these are the elements that fuel my work as a photographer. With his goldfish and studio setting, Matisse’s work references the artist’s toolbox of light, color, and imagination, along with the introspective life of the mind. This painting prompted me to think about my own artistic process and to contemplate my sources of inspiration. As a nod to Matisse, I photographed my workspace in order to show how my digital darkroom parallels his twentieth century studio and how our love of artistic creation unites us across time.

Amy Wilson is a photographer and children's book author.

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Henri Matisse. Studio with Goldfish (L'Atelier aux poissons rouges). BF569


Robyn Kweon. Soutine’s Flayed Rabbit. #1227
Robyn Kweon
Oil on Canvas 2018 Soutine’s Flayed Rabbit is an iconic part of the Barnes collection. So, I decided to juxtapose the jarring visual of the rabbit carcass with a bright blue ambience to inspire a pop art-esque impression. Barnes wanted his collection to be an educational institution; to reach even ordinary people with little schooling. Similarly, pop art reaches a wide audience by utilizing popular, eccentric images, as opposed to indulging the complex sensibilities of highly educated art historians. This work responds to Barnes’ commitment to accessibility by evoking the spirit of pop art though one of the quirkiest pieces in his collection.

Robyn Kweon is a student artist studying art and biology at the University of Pennsylvania.

Website

Chaim Soutine. Flayed Rabbit (Le Lapin écorché). BF333


Conley Easter. Red Madras Headdress Color Study. #1107
Conley Easter
At their most basic level paintings are just colors strategically arranged on a canvas. I have always been fascinated by elements of paintings, particularly the color choices. The piece I have done examines and explores the colors Henri Matisse picked and displays them as a color study instead of as a defined portrait.

Conley Easter is an emerging artist, originally from Birmingham, Alabama. He has called Philadelphia home for almost five years. He is preparing to study architecture at Temple University in the fall.


Henri Matisse. Red Madras Headdress (Le Madras rouge). BF448


Maria R Schneider. Poems by the Sea. #1072
Maria R Schneider
I was deeply drawn by the huges of “Amalfi: Moonlight Pattern.” I wanted to copy the range of colors, but discard the lines and the pattern repetitions, to express a visceral reaction to Morgan’s painting. The poetry of the painting is literally expressed by Antonio Machado’s verses printed and arranged as diffused lines. I use gauze cloth dipped in oil paint to create translucent brushstrokes to start a dialogue with the original work.

Schneider’s work is about the physical layering of images and the figurative layering of place, religion, history and economic divisions. A native of Madrid, Spain, Schneider studied at The Art Student League of New York and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Drawing and experimentation have always been central to her artistic practice. From the early bull paintings and the newspaper and cloth clippings to the LED drawings, Schneider is always searching and moving forward in her artistic practice. Her work is part of the collections of CubeSmart, AIMCO, and PwC as well as private collections in the United States and Europe. Her work has been exhibited in Philadeplhia, Harrisburg, Houston, and Madrid, Spain.

Website

Randall Morgan. Amalfi: Moonlight Pattern. BF2538


Frank Sung. i was definitely a lake. #1128
Frank Sung
My experience growing up as a Taiwanese-American influences the underlying theme of my work, which is identity or lack thereof. I explore the idea of recontextualization and the line between reality and the sublime. 'i was definitely a lake' is a response to 'Girl Asleep' by William James Glackens. I was so taken and comforted by the image of the sleeping girl and I wanted to produce a similar feeling with a collage. I also wondered what she was dreaming so I added this sense of a dream to the piece. I hope you are comforted in the same way Glackens' piece comforted me.

Frank Sung grew up in New Jersey and is now a Philly-based artist after some traveling in Europe. His journey of crossing border to border, trying to find a sense of home, can be felt in his work. This is his first time exhibiting in Philadelphia.

Website

William James Glackens. Girl Asleep. BF642


monsters & molotovs. What are you really hungry for?. #1241
monsters & molotovs
When I saw "Interior: Jim" by Harry Sefarbi, I had a strong emotional reaction and decided almost immediately that this was the piece for me to respond to. The image of a young person, sitting alone and desolate at a kitchen table, brought me back to a difficult time in my life, when I was deep in my struggle with anorexia nervosa. I remember vividly the feeling of sitting alone at tables. Whether I was eating or not, with people or alone, I experienced a pervasive feeling of isolation. In my painting, I have depicted three past versions of myself sitting at table in the dining room of the seafoam-green-and-coral residential treatment center I spent time in while attempting to recover from my eating disorder. Confronting my demons was excruciating. Furthermore, despite being surrounded by people who presumably related to my experiences having — and trying to recover from — an eating disorder, I felt unable to truly connect. Nevertheless, in the body language of the figures I’ve painted here, I see a progressive unfolding, not planned or intended, but produced as I mirrored elements of Sefarbi’s composition. Once I recognized this, I repeatedly asked myself: is the person on the far right a staff member observing patients? or me? In the spirit of Dr. Albert C. Barnes, I’ll leave that for the viewer to decide.

monsters & molotovs is an artist and writer based in Philadelphia. Originally from Houston, Texas, they graduated from the American University in Washington, DC with a bachelor's degree in political science. They have since taken a series of art classes at the Glassell School of Art in Houston and at Fleisher Art Memorial in Philadelphia. Their work focuses on the use of imaginary characters, bright colors, patterns, and obsessive detail as a means of self-expression and healing.

Website

Harry Sefarbi. Interior: Jim. BF2540


David J. Lawrence. Cosmic Woman III. #1101
David J. Lawrence
The sign of a genuine work of art is that it can stir our unconsciousness feelings, and past emotional experiences, while also inspiring self awareness, and cultural intergrity.Utlizing ancient indigious art as a reference guide helps to enchance my knowledge of traditional African art and gives me a better understanding of cultural history, which allows me to teach other through my paintings. Living out my passion and spiritual purpose is the ultimate dream job.

I am a multi media two-dimensional artist who works in many mediums such as oils, acrylics, watercolors, collage, and composition leafings; bringing together a collage of techniques. I intergrate them into styles such as cubism, figurative, abstract, and my own styles of "Pyramidism" and "Metamorphosis".


Amedeo Modigliani. Beatrice (Portrait de Béatrice Hastings). BF361


Ashley Turner. Ashley Turner Sampler. #1293
Ashley Turner
This illustration pays homage to a 19th century Pennsylvania German sampler created by an unidentified maker. In early America, samplers were often made by young girls to demonstrate skill in needlework. Interested in the history and tradition of sampler-making, I chose to focus on the Barnes Foundation’s theme of “a story behind every object” as opposed to the formalist Barnes methodology. I am especially intrigued by the idea of young girls using domestic arts to defy anonymity. In “American Needlework in the Eighteenth Century,” Amelia Peck writes, “Girls usually signed their samplers, stitching their name, age, and the date the sampler was completed. These small bits of embroidered cloth are often all that remains to testify to the otherwise unrecorded lives of their makers” (Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000 - http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/need/hd_need.htm, October 2003). These samplers survive as evidence not only of these girls’ existence, but often of their interests. Using the Barnes collection’s sampler as inspiration for composition and design, I created an illustration with a Philadelphia heritage theme, highlighting the Municipal Flag of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania's coat of arms, the Liberty Bell, and Independence Hall. American folk art motifs are seen in the border. And true to sampler tradition, my illustration includes name, age, place of residence, and the year it was made.

Ashley Turner, originally from Nashville, Tennessee, is painter/illustrator who specializes in highly detailed designs that often incorporate flora and fauna. She does commissioned portraits of people, houses, and pets; she creates custom wedding paper suites, illustrated maps, and brand designs; and she is currently writing and illustrating her first book. A history-lover, Ashley has recently begun work in heritage illustration, including projects in Boston and in the UK. Ashley recently relocated to Philadelphia where she was excited to find a house built in the mid-nineteenth century. Ashley works from her home studio in the company of her red dog, Scarlett.

Website

Unidentified maker. Sampler. 01.13.02


Krista Svalbonas. A Long Drive in the Country. #1124
Krista Svalbonas
Ideas of home have always been compelling to me as the child of immigrant parents who arrived in the United States as refugees. My work explores architecture’s relationship to cultural identity, social hierarchy, and psychological space. Exploring the Barnes, I was immediately drawn to Demuth's painting "Piano Mover’s Holiday". This work immediately brought me back to my childhood, growing up near the abandoned Bethlehem Steel Plant. Much like Demuth, in my own work, I often document my surroundings, exploring ideas of home and identity. Demuth spent most of his life in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, a city in his time, much like Bethlehem, that was brimming with the activity of the industrial revolution. While Demuth painted his surroundings, the air was filled with steam and the sounds of clanking metal. I, however, was surrounded by a ghost of Demuth's past, left to rust and decay. For this piece I returned to my roots to photograph the former Steel Plant in Bethlehem. I cut and collaged the photographs together, paying attention to the sharp industrial angles of the structures much like a “Precisionist” of Demuth’s era. To push the cubist reference within this work, I painted areas of the collaged images, masking segments of the photographs, thus creating intriguing sense of space, while also referencing my own personal history.

Krista Svalbonas ( b.1977, USA ) holds a BFA Photography (Syracuse University) and an MFA Interdisciplinary (SUNY New Paltz). Her work has been exhibited in a number of exhibitions including at the Klompching Gallery and ISE Cultural Foundation in New York. Her work has been collected in a number of private collections, as well as the Cesis Art Museum in Latvia. Recent awards include the Rhonda Wilson Award (2017), Puffin Foundation Grant (2016) and a Bemis Fellowship (2015) among others. In 2015 Svalbonas exhibited a solo installation at the Spartanburg Art Museum in South Carolina. She is an assistant professor of photography at St. Joseph’s University. She lives and works in Philadelphia.

Website

Charles Demuth. Piano Mover's Holiday. BF339


Naomi Orwin. Covered / Uncovered. #1166
Naomi Orwin
Looking at the art in the Barnes for this project led to asking questions I don’t usually ask. Then, having found a picture that resonated, I started asking new questions, discovering parts I liked and parts I didn’t. What I had initially set out to do changed as I looked at the work and assembled materials for my own creation. Words are my usual medium and finding a way to translate a verbal response into a visual one has been part of the challenge. As a teacher of screenwriting, i appreciate how the visual can be used to tell a story that transcends narrative. I have tried to do that here.

Naomi Orwin is a writer and teacher of writing. A lover of travel, she has settled in Philly and tries to participate in the opportunities her new found home offers to not only observe but participate in its vibrant art and culture scene. Her writing about the arts is enhanced by being a creator as well as an audience member.


Gustave Courbet. Woman with White Stockings (La Femme aux bas blancs). BF810


Morgan Thomas Shankweiler. Sacrilege/Through her eyes. #1217
Morgan Thomas Shankweiler
In "Sacrilege/Through her eyes", a young mother nurses a daughter on a public bench. The man walking by scowls at the sight of an exposed breast. An older daughter nestles into her mom, but meets the eye of the rubbernecker. The composition of this opaque watercolor painting mimics Madonna and Child by Hans Baldung Grien in form and in secondary subject. A Madonna is a religious painting representing Mary, mother of Jesus Christ. A Madonna is a representation of the perfect mother and woman in the Christian religion; pure, virginal, devoted. In Hans Baldung Grien's Madonna, Mary is nursing her son as an angel hovers over her left shoulder. The warm colors of mother and child form a triangle against the cool blue background. In the contemporary version of this scene, the devoted mother, not the Madonna, feeds her child but is threatened by scorn rather than angelic worship. The "sacrilege" is for the viewer to decide. Is it sacrilege to breastfeed in public? Is it sacrilege to look? Is this painting sacrilege for mimicking a painting of the Virgin Mary, literally a religious painting? And, looking further, what message is the older daughter receiving? How does she see the situation through her eyes?

Morgan Thomas Shankweiler was born and raised in the suburbs of Philadelphia. She currently lives in Swarthmore, PA with her husband, three stepsons, twin daughters and standard poodle. Shankweiler's work finds inspiration in societal and historical expectations for women, mothers and daughters and the ways in which these expectations shape our contemporary experience.


Hans Baldung Grien (Hans Baldung). Madonna and Child. BF316


Parker Jackson . Darling on Point. #1233
Parker Jackson
Georges Seurat's work can be read as very political in nature. My response to his piece entitled "models (Poseuses)" keeps some of his ideas and techniques alive while bringing in contemporary political themes.

Parker Jackson is a queer, non binary working artist in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They have a Bachelors of Fine Arts degree from Pennsylvania College of Art and Design, and over 13 years of experience working in the arts field. You can often find them working and volunteering with non profits around Philadelphia teaching art to youth. Their work primarily focuses on political themes, environmentalism and most recently, mental health advocacy.

Website

Georges Seurat. Models (Poseuses). BF811


Miranda Blas. Dragon Spit. #1076
Miranda Blas
Every time I walk through the permanent collection at the Barnes Foundation I am fascinated by the masterpieces in the museum. Usually I’m drawn to the solid, luminous Cezannes, and other times I am taken by the whimsical Matisses. Recently the work that I found myself dreaming of wasn’t a painting but a simple iron spit. The 18th century Spanish metalwork occupies space masterfully. I have never seen a sculpture use line, volume and movement so powerfully. As one moves around it, the piece changes; every angle is different. I’ve tried to capture these qualities in the spirit of Matisse and Cezanne.

Miranda has a Master’s Degree of Fine Arts from the Marchutz School of Fine Art in Aix-en-Provence, France. Miranda believes in the importance of fusing the liberal arts, art criticism, art history and plein air painting with studio practice. She emphasizes a continual study of the masterworks of all eras — from ancient Islamic ceramics to the works of El Greco to the paintings of Berthe Morisot. She is committed to the flummoxing, difficult and ultimately pleasurable pursuit of grasping and rendering her unique vision of nature. In her work Miranda tries to transcend the real while remaining informed by the realm of the senses. She currently teaches art to people of all ages in Philadelphia, PA and Annapolis, MD.

Website

Unidentified maker. Spit. 01.21.57


A. Dean Harris. The Baptism of Trump (The Trials of Paul Ryan) . #1260
A. Dean Harris
After taking several trips to admire the collection of the Barnes Foundation, I found myself drawn to Paolo Veronese's Baptism of Christ. When I first began studying art history, I found myself deeply admiring the techniques, and specifically the color, of the Venetian School. Originating with Giorgione's short and innovative career, Titian and his subsequent students, Veronese and Tintoretto developed the vibrant color sense, and the soft, sfumato paint application that would come to define Venetian art and late Renaissance period over all. Any opportunity I have to further my knowledge and experience with any of these masters in person is a welcome and invigorating chance for me to deconstruct, in this case, Veronese's techniques, sensibilities, and attempt to gain an intimate experience with what he saw as necessary for creating life in art. My overwhelming dismay with the current state of politics in America will push me to the point of anger and frustration, that will then lead to a dull numbness if left unchallenged by any other approach. Recently I was able to see John Waters give a talk in which he mentioned "Embarrassment Terrorism" where artist, filmmakers, and writers seek to embarrass those in power who fragrantly flaunt their deceptive, self-serving, agenda. The Republican party, by means of its association with Christianity, had assumed the roll of America's moral conscience. But then a man with a history of serial misogyny blew past every other Republican candidate, and the GOP was forced to baptize him as their new savior. I am trying to point out this hypocrisy with my painting.

Allen Dean Harris was born in Columbia Maryland, and moved to Philadelphia in 2003 to attend the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. After completing three years at PAFA, he transferred to the University of Pennsylvania to finish his Bachelors of Fine Arts, and also obtained an Art History Minor. After graduating in 2008, Allen has had numerous shows in Philadelphia, New York City and Virginia exhibiting his oil paintings, as well as teaching abroad in South Korea, and teaching at charter schools in Philadelphia. Allen's work often addresses political and social issues, globalization, and considers the plight of urban, post-industrial life in 21st century America.

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Veronese (Paolo Caliari). Baptism of Christ. BF800


Margo. Victorious. #1059
Margo
Picasso's "The Ascetic (L' Ascete)" captured my attention with its stark portrayal of loneliness and sorrow. It contrasts sharply with the figurative painting, "Woman on a Red Sofa (Femme sur on conape rouge)" located directly above it. "The Ascetic"'s tight brush strokes and mournful appearance are completely opposite the "Woman on a Red Sofa"'s loose strokes and relaxed posture. Both of these paintings influenced "Victorious." I hope to portray another way of looking at the world than Picasso's piece. In "Victorious" joy and hope come into play as the figure looks towards the light.

Margaret Muench is a 23-year-old artist from the Philadelphia area. She specializes in the areas of painting and drawing. The artist has been making work since she was a young child and loves making use of her wide imagination and diverse color palette. “I like to draw viewers into my art pieces and make them come to their own conclusions about what is going on within them. Leaving the punchline up to the discretion of the public is very important to me,” Margaret says of her work. The artist is known for her emotional portrayal of the human figure and her night landscapes which beckon onlookers to delve into her world.

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Pablo Picasso. The Ascetic (L' Ascète). BF115


V Melching. The White Dress. #1138
V Melching
What is beauty? Who gets to express it, be it, take it, keep it, paint it? And where does power come into play at each stage? I find myself bothered by the typical themes assigned to genders present in many of the works on display. Women and girls are often given the roles of submissive, sad, hysterical, vacant, vain or sexualized (or oh yes, mother). Whereas the men that are depicted represent the more general scope of humanity in all its successes and failures. Essentially, allowed a fuller spectrum of being (minus some of the attributes assigned to the female). For my submission I combined the likeness of two paintings from the Barnes collection (Honore' Daumier, The Hypochondriac, BF75 and also Jules Pascin, Seated Girl in Chemise, BF483) as an invitation to a new story line. Done in perhaps some interpreted spirit of Daumier's caricaturing, my commentary became a focus on Pascin and other painters of the time and style when the focus was strictly on painting nudes or near nudes of young women and small girls. My mind could only wonder on the behind the scenes and the questions rose again of power and value. I tried to see through the minds of the painted, then the painters, the collector, and the eventual imagined viewers. In this traveling, I asked the men to see themselves in the work. What is it you are after? You obsess to achieve? To connect to? To decipher and depict? To hold and display? And how do you feel in the chair with your skirt pulled up? I'd be curious to know the answers.

Philadelphia native and current resider. In an ideal scenario, found deep in a forrest. Fond of soul expressive outlets for survival, exploration, conversation, community, and heart/mind maintenance. Not usually a self-proclaimed artist. However, has always enjoyed partaking in the outpour. "When I'm creating art it is most commonly either play or working something out, such as a conflict, a memory, a dream or an idea. 'The White Dress' painting in particular is a combination of those things."


Honoré Daumier. The Hypochondriac (Le Malade imaginaire). BF75


Fred Henzel. Six Legged Rabbit. #1084
Fred Henzel
The painting "Flayed Rabbit" appealed to me because of Chaim Soutine's expressive approach to an ordinary object. In his depiction of the carcass of a rabbit, I find myself contemplating the fact that it was once living and also its potential to provide nourishment and support life beyond its own. As an example to go by, the artist's work gave me liberty to explore similar ideas with the same vivacity in my handling of paint. I often see city environments in the same light as Soutine's painting of the cut-open body of a rabbit. They can seem dysfunctional and claustrophobic, but they are steadfastly a part of life and thus a reflection of it. They are also full of unexplained phenomenon, such as a six-legged rabbit. Freakish though he is, this is his dwelling place. While the walls seem to close in and limit things, there is hope in the fact that he thrives here.

I moved to Philadelphia from Chicago in August 2017 in order to find new contacts and generally expand my art practice. My work is about unusual imagined scenes that either lack narrative or have ambiguous narrative. It is more about action or force from one person or object to another, in a space that is convincing but unreal. This reflects the way I view the world, which, to me, is full of surprising and unexplained phenomenon. I do not seek to explain these phenomenon as supernatural, for example, but merely marvel at the complexity of it all, and accept humility at not being able to grasp it in its entirety. I also sometimes work from photographs but aim to distort things or emphasize unusual elements.

Website

Chaim Soutine. Flayed Rabbit (Le Lapin écorché). BF333


Risa Sato. Youth. #1167
Risa Sato
I think that the timelessness of Van Gogh's "The Postman" lies in his expression. Joseph Etienne Roulin can objectively be described as a middle aged man, but as I sat in the gallery staring into his eyes, I only saw youthfulness. Something about his rosy cheeks or peering eyes felt young and full of life. Youth is something we idolize as a form of urban deity and is what felt like was being honored in this portrait. I wanted my painting to have the same sense of vibrancy with flowers and the green background to honor what it feels like to be young. The subject is up to interpretation, but its playfulness and its muses are a collage of my youth as a college student who moved to Philadelphia alone from half way across the globe. The people we meet and the moments we share with them are what I think keeps us all young. This certainly is what feels like is behind The Postman's expression. My version of these memories are what makes up this portrait of a sculpture and cherry blossoms.

Risa is currently a business major at the University of Pennsylvania from Tokyo, Japan. Because of her interest in entrepreneurship, she is taking both engineering and art courses to understand innovation as the intersection of both. This serves as the inspiration for most of her art that she produces from her tiny dorm room when she is not working on problem sets or essays. As a self-taught artist, Risa's art experience comes from two classes she took in high school and a lot of exploration in her free time.


Vincent van Gogh. The Postman (Joseph-Étienne Roulin). BF37


Stevie French. The Wondrous Tale of Abigail. #1232
Stevie French
Come for the Matisse, stay for the horse doodle. I unexpectedly stumbled upon the charming “Horse,” by an unknown 19th century artist, and was immediately captivated. I imagined the story behind the drawing, particularly what it says about the artist. Perhaps the anonymous creator was an older woman without much practice. Maybe she started the drawing as a doodle between chores. Taking her cue, I let my mind wander and began to compose a poem about the little horse. I wrote a fantasy to give the animal—“Abigail”--something to aspire to, a story where she encounters a mystical spirit who transforms her. As an illustrator, this is how I begin conceptualizing my work: stream-of-consciousness, then letting the words inspire characters who begin to add layers to my story. I favor pen, but have recently been experimenting with mixed media, as in this submission. In my other roles as an art therapist and non-profit administrator, I feel privileged to hear stories of hope, hardship and strength from people every day. My love of people and their stories influence my artwork as well, where I focus on developing strong characters who drive the narrative and visuals. I am inspired by modern masters such as Matisse and Picasso, as well as Edward Gorey, Tim Burton, Dr. Seuss, Shel Silverstein, and folk art. If I won the artist residency, I would use it to finish my third children’s book, a surreal, prehistoric fantasy. I am already dreaming of the wondrous adventures that await!

Stevie French, MA, is an art therapist, illustrator and the Assistant Director BuildaBridge International. Stevie’s published books include Lizzie Fox-Top and Cousin Ann’s Stories for Children. Stevie has worked in community arts, psychiatric, forensic, and outpatient settings with children and adults experiencing trauma, depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and other mental health issues. Stevie has presented at Jefferson University, Temple University, and Community College of Philadelphia, and previously served on the Board of Directors for the Pennsylvania Art Therapy Association (formerly DVATA). Stevie earned her MA from Drexel University and BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University. Contact: steviefrench59@gmail.com.

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Unidentified artist. Horse. BF1166


Phyllis Gorsen. The Girls. #1203
Phyllis Gorsen
My painting, “The Girls” is inspired by Matisse’s painting, “The Three Sisters with Grey Background”. I have always loved Matisse, inspired by his use explosive use of color and expressive lines while portraying the quiet passages of everyday life. His paintings felt like love letters to those instances that are easily unnoticed. That is what inspires me when I paint. I want to portray my affection for those overlooked pieces of daily life with the color and vibrancy that I feel towards them. “The Three Sisters with Grey Background” show three females posing for the artist. I was drawn to this painting because I found myself trying to interpret the relationship between the sisters. What did their body positioning reveal? How close were they?, etc. The more I examined it, the more I read into the familial relationships I thought it described. It had me thinking that there is something undeniable about the bonds between women. Women tend to seek out the camaraderie they can only attain with other women. My painting, “The Girls” describes that camaraderie. It shows only the bottom half of three women, all wearing skirts. They are posing, just as in Matisse’s painting. Although unseen, the viewer can surmise that the women are arm in arm, pulled together through some connection. It is a very common picture, one that most women can relate to. It is meant to expose the affinity that women feel in the presence of other women with whom they have a bond.

Phyllis Gorsen, born in Philadelphia, PA, predominantly works in the medium of painting. In 2014, Gorsen received her MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Her work has been exhibited nationally, including galleries in New York, Philadelphia, Delaware, and California. Gorsen recently had a solo show at Chris White Gallery. She has also curated shows at ARTSPACE 1241. Over the last couple of years, Gorsen has been featured in many publications including: The Philadelphia Inquirer, ArtBlog, Create! Magazine, Not Random Art, Fresh Paint Magazine, the Courier Post and Glassworks Magazine. Many of her paintings are in collections throughout the United States. Gorsen currently works out of her studio located in Philadelphia.

Website

Henri Matisse. Three Sisters with Grey Background (Les Trois sœurs sur fond gris). BF888


Kimberlee Traub. Tribal Dancer. #1078
Kimberlee Traub
My muses are often tribal dancers and fire/flow artists. These women appear to me as fierce Goddess figures empowered by the spells cast by their beauty, movement, and imagination. Matisse's "Moorish Woman (Knee Raised)" caught my eye because she reminds me of a dancer friend, especially the green hair. In the context and history of the Barnes Museum, I began thinking about how the Orientalism of the 1920s could now be perceived as an insensitive stereotype by a colonizer. Where is the line between celebrating culture versus appropriation? Is that line getting blurred? My odalisque is not a harem slave as fantasized by a male painter. My reclining woman is a modern witch gathering energy to raise consciousness and creativity in her ritualistic dance ornamented by the nature around her.

Kimberlee Traub creates her unique, illustrative art in her Fishtown, Philadelphia studio and shows in gallery spaces to the streets. Past lives include Kensington Kinetic Sculpture Derby pilot, clothing company visual artist, gallery assistant, body painter, production artist for a puppet theater, volunteer art teacher, and creator for local Halloween attractions as an actress, stage manager and crafter of haunted houses. She also placed several murals around Center Camp in Black Rock City/Burning Man and and helped lead art installations to the desert. Kimberlee completed the Philadelphia Mural Arts Training Program in 2017 and is looking forward to a summer 2018 apprenticeship.

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Henri Matisse. Moorish Woman (The Raised Knee) [Femme mauresque (Le Genou levé)]. BF890


Ellen Tiberino. War Mask. #1130
Ellen Tiberino
Artist Statement Since birth I was involved in the visual arts and the spirit of creativity. My parents Ellen Powell Tiberino and Joe Tiberino, both had distinguished visual art careers. As a child, I always worked at home as an artist and attended classes at Fleisher Art Memorial. In my youth, I shied away from becoming an artist not wanting to be a part of the family business. Over the past fifteen years I have been inspired and I’ve developed a prominent artist. The largest part of my inspiration was in finding my medium. I truly enjoy working with glass and the entire process is a very soothing, almost religious experience for me. From choosing the different rich colors of glass panes, then cutting and moving the glass pieces around until they work just right, to seeing the finished product emerge after grouting. I work with the stained glass in a method of mosaic that I would equate to painting with glass. It is very thought out and precise. I like the colors of the stained glass to flow. Nature is one of my biggest inspirations, in which I am constantly amazed and astounded by the natural world around me, and I seek to glorify it in my artwork. AS a concerned environmentalist, I am deeply affected and traumatized by the massive destruction of our natural world by man. I hope my work will convey some of the earth’s precious natural beauty. As an Artist, I like to take my pain and inner turmoil and turn it into something beautiful for the world to see.

ELLEN TIBERINO 3819 Hamilton Street Philadelphia, PA 19104 267-721-5181 ellentiberino@gmail.com Professional Summary Dynamic problem solver with fifteen years in customer service expertise including: event planning, logistical coordination and bookkeeping. A strong leader with excellent communication skills and proven organizational abilities, who passionately brings creative vision to project management. Over ten years’ experience in specialty education including afterschool lead teacher, curriculum development and artist workshop development and execution. Lola 38 at the Arts Bank Art Commission 2017- 2017 Ellen Powell Tiberino Memorial Museum Philadelphia, PA Director of Cultural Events

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Unidentified artist. Mask (Gunyege). A128


Soku Massimo(Michael Rowe). Layers Of Consciousness. #1206
Soku Massimo(Michael Rowe)
Going through the Barnes so many pieces inspired me and I incorporated them into this piece through shapes, styles, and colors.There was one piece that truly intrigued me that I kept coming back to; Henri Edmond Cross' Two Women by the Shore. I was most drawn to the use of color and purposeful looseness of the piece. I incorporated a newly discovered technique to mimic the brightness of those breathtaking colors in my geometric shaped brightly colored piece. I wanted to recreate the emotions I felt when taking in all those color working on their own and in harmony with each other to create one scene. I have always loved geometric shapes and I was also inspired by furniture that was in the collection as well and it inspired the forms around these loose colors. I looked at each portion of this painting as a work of art in itself that all came together to create this one piece.

My name is Soku Massimo; as an Artist I am always looking for new ways to create and experience art. I do not limit the types of art I do or the materials I use. I do what I feel. In this approach to art I am always learning and never static. It helps me to be limitless in the the creation of my art and in my growth as an artist. This year I celebrate 10 years as an artist and everyday I am still learning, growing, and creating.

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Henri Edmond Cross. Two Women by the Shore, Mediterranean. BF436


Liliana Perez. Humanity. #1298
Liliana Perez
2018 Artist statement My intention is to work from observation/perception as I hunt for images that live deep inside me, inside that space where I feel time stands’ still. Working from perception by nature it is rattled with tension. I like to describe the feeling similar to when you are in moving fast and feel very present in space. At that moment an image comes to mind. The image scurries away and I have to wait patiently to see it again. Looking at the plants, figure and landscape, takes on a cat and mouse game. It’s like facing two mirrors towards each other, with a very narrow band of view, to look in the mirror. The work is seeded in rhythm, enfolding as the model and landscape constantly shifts, subtle or dramatic. The color and line moves to the right, the left, above or below, scurrying its way across the surface. I create a strategy to create a mark. The same way a hunter waits for it’s prey to be caught, knowing all along it’s about me being still. I imagine sitting at the edge of a lake and staring into a pool of water. I see myself breathing underwater, startled by the image, I gasped for air. The work has to contain a breath of life. Liliana Perez

Liliana Perez www.LilianaPerez.com Born in Havana, Cuba, While in Cuba, at the age six I decided to make a drawing from the balcony of our family’s second floor apartment in Central Havana. I showed the drawing of a car, to my father and uncle. My dad was impressed but my uncle proceeded to show me how a car ought to be drawn. I notice his symbolic interpretation of the geometric shapes, the simplification of forms is not what a car looks like when its drawn from observation, beside that is not how I saw it. I took his drawing and instructions back to the balcony. I told myself to never make a drawing from general information. I sat down to make the most earnest intentionally clear drawing ever. That childhood experience has informed

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Paul Cézanne. Bathers at Rest (Baigneurs au repos). BF906


Sue Patterson. Reading Terminal. #1185
Sue Patterson
Artwork is a way of processing, of testing my assumptions, and an ongoing experiment with how meaning is crafted, or found. I find pleasure in investigation, and enjoy work that is generous without being easy. My studio life is not the navel of my universe but rather the editing room and the kitchen; part anthropology, part chemistry. I have a habit of spending a lot of time outside the art world, for economic reasons, to maximize my own capacity, and out of curiosity, but also to be reminded that creative thinking can be exercised anywhere, not just the art world. I believe that there is no one fulcrum upon which perception rests. I often use language as part of my visual vocabulary. The writing works as another built or found journey, acknowledging yet another level of complexity. Sometimes it is mortar, sometimes it is brick. I like the density of poems, their particular accuracy, and the absence of rules that insist on meaning that must accumulate in a straight line. I do not expect that the writing exists separate from the work and in most cases the two are developed side by side. One act is the measure of the others.

Sue Patterson has been a resident of Philadelphia since 1983. She in an alum of the Tyler School of Art graduate program, and was a Project Manager and Construction Technician at the Fabric Workshop and Museum for 15 years. She currently works an an engineer for the Philadelphia Water Department.

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Pablo Picasso. Letter with Blind Man and Dog. BF714


Eliza Leighton. The Teacher. #1198
Eliza Leighton
Upon seeing Milton Avery’s work, The Nursemaid, for the first time, I was struck by the realization that the racial dynamic in Avery’s painting (a black woman caring for a young white girl) has flipped. In the Philadelphia charter school where I worked, most teachers were white women while the student body was majority African-American and Latino. White teachers were thrown into the classroom with minimal training and limited understanding of the complexities of race and class. The little girl in my work, The Teacher, shares the same expression as the Nursemaid in Avery’s painting. Although the racial roles have been reversed over eighty years later, the relationship between black and white folks has remained almost exactly the same. The direct and childlike manner of collage used to create this work echoes Avery’s simplistic style, and highlights the emotions of the Teacher and her young student.

Eliza Leighton rediscovered art at age twenty-four, when she began the difficult process of confronting her past traumatic experiences. Collaging and embroidering allowed her to cope and give voice to experiences she could not put into words. Eliza's current work is primarily installation-based. She occupies entire spaces with color, texture, and found objects. She is interested in the tension of holding seemingly opposite ideas within the same space: comfort and fear, touch as pleasure and touch as invasion. She focuses on themes of intimacy and violence, femininity, and racial identity. Eliza Leighton was born in South Florida and currently resides in West Philadelphia.

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Milton Avery. The Nursemaid. BF961


Melissa Joseph. Found Wanting. #1136
Melissa Joseph
I am concerned with weight. I often feel detached from my body, and as a result, I continually search for ways to tether myself to moments and places in time. I do this, at times, by collecting heavy objects and keeping them nearby--even wearing them as jewelry. These touchstones act as a comforting and grounding wire. I find old rusted metal objects to be particularly beautiful because of the history they carry. The objects embody hidden narratives while inviting me to participate in their stories. The first thing I noticed about the Barnes Collection and its exhibition model was the way Dr. Barnes mixed images and objects. It is so natural how the artifacts engage with the masterpieces around them. While I prefer to view fewer objects at a time than he did, I am enchanted by the intriguing combinations of the Barnes Collection.

Melissa Joseph is an artist and educator from Northwest Pennsylvania. She is completing her MFA at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts this spring. For ten years she taught K-12 art around the United States and in Europe. Before teaching, she worked as an industrial and fashion textile designer. Melissa has art and education degrees from NYU, FIT, and RISD. Her work has been exhibited in shows at the PAFA Museum as well as the Woodmere Museum, Tyler School of Art, and Rider University.

Website

Unidentified maker. Thumbpiece. 01.07.12


Lydia Smith . Historical Ground (for klee) . #1224
Lydia Smith
I was immediately drawn to Klee's drawing "Historical Ground" because its material is difficult to decipher. It presents itself as a print or embossment, but upon further inspection it is watercolor. This is due to investment covering layered underpainting, or groundwork. In my piece I also try to achieve the uncanny, by painting Tyvek from the back and warping it with heat. The information and history of the painting is the color, which is buried underneath the surface of the painting in multiple layers. The surface of each work therefore becomes a mask or veil.

Lydia Smith is an interdisciplinary artist working in South Philadelphia. Her heavily based in material exploration and mapping cultural information from research gathered on cemeteries, with particular emphasis on how these landscapes can reflect cultural attitudes towards death across the world. She is also interested in memorial, the romance of destruction, the human attraction to the uncanny, and the preservation of decay. Lydia received her BA from Rice University in 2015. Her work has been exhibited in Philadelphia PA, Houston TX, Chicago IL, Portland MN, Prague, and Cairo.

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Paul Klee. Historic Ground (Historischer Boden). BF2532


Grace . Come closer , come closer please. . #1162
Grace
This piece started from my sketch book- sitting- looking —painting on the balcony of the monument valley hotel we could not afford. I was captured ... drawn into this magical- landscape - like many of those who came before- As if taking communion together...—connecting —to that same ‘something extraordinary’ out there... But It is through seeing Matisse’s “Joy of life,” that I realized what I wanted to create, was also an Arcadian landscape but —one of my own. As Matisse wanted us to feel bliss in distraught times, I want my viewers to feel a longing for closeness in this time of distance and over connection.

During the day- I am a menswear designer- I create polos, joggers, hoodies— which I love. There is something about creating garments for others that is intimate and exciting— as if I’m making contact & passing along a bit myself to the world. For the remaining hours, I am a painter, a writer, a wanderer—interested in crossing borders, crossing lines—Experimental in nature, I paint in various mediums and thrive on the mixing of ‘things.’ Though I love my dual life —I struggle - and struggle often to figure out how the joggers and the painting, the words and the polos can come together and if products and objects is the final end. I suppose time will answer, until then I will continue to create.

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Henri Matisse. Le Bonheur de vivre, also called The Joy of Life. BF719


Alan Smith. Natural Beauty. #1094
Alan Smith
Renoir's use of brush strokes and capturing of light and motion has always inspired me. I am drawn to this piece because of the connection between people and nature. I painted a male figure from the Omo Valley in Ethiopia. The people in this valley use vegetation and the colored mud there to adorn themselves. I chose to respond this way because I am black and gay, and art that represents me is often absent from traditional collections. I titled it "Natural Beauty" because I wish to promote idea that people with darker skins are naturally beautiful and don't need to conform to standards of whiteness. I also chose this title because of the deep connection and respect these people have with nature, something I wish all of us could nurture.

Artist, philosopher, and peacemaker, Alan Smith draws, paints and assembles art that reflects his passion for life. Whether it's pastel portraits, acrylic paintings, or photography, or an abstract collage, he seeks to express his unique connection with each subject.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Girls in the Grass Arranging a Bouquet (Fillette couchée sur l'herbe et jeune fille arrangeant un bouquet). BF155


Michelle E. Haberl. Picassoidal Variations. #1118
Michelle E. Haberl
Primarily figurative in nature, my more recent work clings to the expressive eccentricities of the human form. Convinced that the naked human body is among the most exquisite phenomena naturally occurring, universally relatable yet radically diverse, I am wholly absorbed by its unique facets. My errand is one that deconstructs preconceived notions of the body as a fixed, unyielding unit and reconstructs it—corporis animati—through a visual understanding of its loosely-bound, fluid masses, and free-flowing physicality. While my latest piece “Picassoidal Variations” may seem unrelated, it – like my other works – finds its origin in figuration, celebrating the blithe pastel hues, fluid contouring, and sculptural modeling of Picasso’s chief subjects (his motley crew of circus performers, Harlequins, and clowns!) that is pervasive throughout his Rose Period. Smitten also with the geometries of form associated with Picasso’s later Cubist pieces, I am focused on the more abstract qualities of his work (sharp angles, raking lines, flat planes of color) in a non-objective divergence from representation. Yet – while flirting with a departure from the third dimension – Picasso never truly did, so too do I take a volumetric approach, in fact making it my cornerstone. “Picassoidal Variations” embraces a sculpturally minimalist style, fascinated mainly with the same world of color, shape, and texture in which the Maestro throve. Warm, pulsating light radiates from an orb of glowing gelatinous beads, reminiscent of specters found in the mind of Mariko Mori, provoking a visceral response from viewers and construing organic overtones.

Michelle Haberl is a painter and draftsperson from Texas, currently residing in (not always sunny) Philadelphia, PA. In 2015, she graduated with an MFA in Studio Art from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. She also holds a BA in Studio Art from Southwestern University and has spent a number of semesters at the Texas Academy of Figurative Art, Studio Incamminati, and the Pont-Aven School of Contemporary Art. Michelle has taught at a variety of art centers, camps, and venues throughout the region and continues to share her passion for art with students at several universities & community colleges in southern NJ. When not drawing, painting, or instructing, Michelle enjoys assisting and volunteering at the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program.

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Pablo Picasso. Young Acrobat. BF72


Michael Keane. Still Life With Marijuana. #1092
Michael Keane
The concept of a still life is one which intrigued me. I wanted to jam off of the early Matisse still life in a way which preserved the simplicity of the scene, but which also presented a milieu which was more relatable to my actual lived experience.

Michael Keane is a self-taught artist, writer, acupuncturist, and herbalist in Philadelphia, PA. His art mostly deals with concepts of the Self, consciousness, color, and psychedelia.


Henri Matisse. Still Life with Lemon (Nature morte au citron). BF460


James Matusheski. Young Ed Sandell. #1218
James Matusheski
My piece "Young Ed Sandell" is a portrait of my grandfather and references Claude Monet's "Portrait de Monsieur Coqueret, (Pére)" in composition and palette. When I originally viewed his portrait, I knew very little about it, but I had an immediate and strong reaction to his father's strength of expression. In my portrait of Young Ed Sandell, I painted my grandfather, and tried to capture a sensitivity in his expression.

James Matusheski was born and raised in the outskirts of Philadelphia, PA. He received a BFA from the University of the Arts in 2011. Matusheski's work is figurative and subversively realistic. He builds tension in the visual field by challenging pictorial expectations. Through paint, he investigates psychological conditions and experiences. Matusheski primarily works in acrylic paint but often experiments with other mediums. He currently lives and paints in South Philadelphia.

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Claude Monet. Monsieur Coqueret (Father) (Portrait de Monsieur Coqueret [Père]). BF725


Leah Mackin. Temporarily Removed from Display. #1111
Leah Mackin
Temporarily Removed from Display is in response to the currently off-view painting by Paul Cézanne, River Bend (Coin de rivière). The breadth and variety of the Barnes collection is unparalleled, dizzying, undeniably incredible. With each visit to the collection, rather than focusing on particular artworks, I found myself drawn the many unique qualities and history of the Barnes Foundation in physicality, lore, and representation. While I noticed a handful of other works throughout the collection that are not currently on display, this particular ghost had a curious stand-in. The burlap, tidily wrapped around stretcher bars, is seen and unseen, with a careful seam running the height of the picture plane. Aesthetic decisions were made to carefully compose this monochrome work that could fall squarely into the canon of minimalist painting. By re-creating this gesture, my piece Temporarily Removed from Display recognizes the construct of the museum-within-a-museum and the ongoing labor devoted to preserving the collection.

Leah Mackin is a visual artist who explores reflection, response, and re-creation utilizing digital and analog reproduction technologies through publishing, photography, sculpture, and performance. After years preserving archival materials as a conservation technician, Mackin utilizes the methods of library documentation and the aesthetics of research in her practice. She holds an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BFA from The University of the Arts.

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Paul Cézanne. River Bend (Coin de rivière). BF973


Doah Lee. The last fresh cake . #1157
Doah Lee
In my work I have explored how children speak and listen, or see and draw, and how images influence the way that a person’s identity is formed. The ambiguous nature and multiplicity of meanings within my complicated cultural and aesthetic influences drive my work and inform its layered quality. My recent investigations, focusing more specifically on issues of self-identification, are a continuation of my practice. I have been living in America as a foreigner since 2008. Since my displacement in a different cultural world, I had to confront the fact that I am an Asian female artist in America now. My biological identity always combats within cultural constructed mind. The work “The last fresh cake” is inspired by the Christmas cake idiom, commonly used in Asia around 90s and also Henri Matisse’s work; Chinese Casket. He depicted two women on the side and back, but the flowers, fruits and jewel box on the table is in the center of the composition surrounded by decorative flower pattern background. I was interested how these objects represent the characters of women. When I was little, I saw my older cousin worried about her age turning 25 without getting marriage and talking about the Christmas cake. The Christmas cake theory expresses women’s marriage and dating value by comparing it to stages of popularity a Christmas cakes before and after Christmas Day. Someone says 35 is check out time for women today. I replaced a woman’s boy to a cake with decorating fruits as usual. The work confronts the violation point of view toward women and opens up conversations to today’s world. It’s ready to celebrate and serve to viewers.

Doah Lee is a visual artist living and working in Philadelphia, PA. She was born and raised in Seoul, South Korea. She is a graduate of School of Art Institute of Chicago with a degree in Painting and Printing making and holds an MFA from University of Pennsylvania. She is the recipient of the Oakley Medal of Achievement and Christopher Leland Lyon Memorial Fund Award. Her work delivers diverse aspects of print, fabric and installation into the format of painting through layering. The works has been featured in various exhibitions. Currently, she is in the residency of Cheltenham center of art, 2017-2018 and a member of artist-run space, FJORD gallery.

Website

Henri Matisse. Chinese Casket (Le Coffret chinois). BF916


Daniel Lipschutz. unidentified maker. #1178
Daniel Lipschutz
Dr. Barnes' ensemble approach brings many added layers of meaning to his collection, quietly revealing the whole to be greater than the sum of it's parts. The careful attention paid to the arrangement of the Barnes collection creates a symphonic celebration of symmetry. This piece, 'unidentified maker' is an homage to the mysteries of perception and the beauty of patterns found in the natural world. The painting represents an exploration into the delicate dance of light, line, color, and space, which Barnes described as "the universal language of art". The anonymous nature of this double-handed porringer, shared with so many other pieces in the Barnes collection, adds to its intrigue. The names and stories of the makers behind these pieces are lost to time, leaving the objects to speak for themselves. Suddenly, otherwise ordinary household objects shine with renewed significance, transforming into sacred relics celebrating form, material, and craftsmanship.

Daniel Lipschutz is an artist and designer living in South Philadelphia. He is honored to work with Mural Arts as an Assistant teaching Artist, learning and growing with youth across the city. Through his paintings and illustrations, he hopes to call attention to the extraordinary details of the natural world, as well as celebrate the sacred process of creation.

Website

Unidentified maker. Double-handled Porringer. 01.08.25ab


Charles Cushing. "Branch and Cherry Blossoms". #1168
Charles Cushing
Amongst he thousands of works in its great collection, the Barnes houses several paintings by Vincent Van Gogh, and I have chosen his small painting "The Factory" as the inspiration and pint of departure for my submission. this painting is note-worthy for solid composition, vibrant color, and strongly marked calligraphy. Along with his impressionist and post-impressionist peers, Van Gogh "rescued" painting from the morass of moribund "academic painting." The Academics (represented by Gerome and the arbiters of the Salon) were reducing painting to a mere competition with photography, in a losing race for complexity illustrational detail. Inspired by Japanese prints, van Gogh, reasserted the primacy of line and calligraphy in painting, ignoring the deadly academic "saw" that "there are no lines in nature, and therefore none in art." He revived strongly marked calligraphic line as well as loaded color and "Japanese" perspective. In so doing, he became one of the greatest communicators in the history of art. While not seeking to mimic Van Gogh specifically, I find that I am very influenced by his use of line, color, texture, composition, and also compositional devices, for example the insertion of figures in environments to add a psychological element to the painting. This painting "The Factory" is a great example of Van Gogh at his highest level of command of painterly devices, effectively employed to realize a vision. In my submitted oil painting, I am responding to his lead with a similar emphasis on bold line, charged color, and loaded paint. Not only "formal" influence, but also to convey "feeling."

Charles Cushing is a graduate of PAFA (1988) and has been living and working in Philadelphia for over 30 years. He has exhibited widely in the region and has sold over 600 paintings that are in public and private collections, mostly in the Philadelphia area. Notable collections that his work is displayed in include The Union League of Philadelphia, and the private collection of Leon Levy. In addition to working from life outdoors, he also paints in classic genres of portrait, nude, still life, and imagination. In recent years, Cushing has made numerous trips to various places such as Newfoundland, Finland, Argentina, and Italy, as well as divers locations in the United States, to paint landscapes and cityscapes.

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Vincent van Gogh. The Factory. BF303


Chenlin Cai. Moonlight Pattern. #1209
Chenlin Cai
The Moonlight Pattern shows me a beautiful imagination and observation of landscape. The abstractive division inspires me the organic pattern in microcosmic scope. I made a series of works by manipulating oil paint texture to mimic the cellular structure. I use this organic pattern to reinterpret landscape in a different visual expression.

Chenlin Cai 蔡陈林, Born in Fujian in 1984, now lives in Beijing and Philadelphia. Cai received his MFA from two of the renowned universities in fine arts. The Tsinghua University in Beijing, China and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Art in Philadelphia, PA, USA Many Chinese artists studying & living aboard believe that western abstracts dominate the contemporary landscape, they must abandon their tradition to cater to the art markets, and the result is often disappointing. Cai immerses in the conflict of these two different art cultures, and art environments did the opposite. He did no compromise, following only his instinct and vision, combining the best of his traditional training as a classical artist and his unorthodox use of p

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Randall Morgan. Amalfi: Moonlight Pattern. BF2538


Bessie Bridges. 21st Century Pedicure. #1099
Bessie Bridges
I was inspired by Horace Pippin because he painted from real life and with a few lines of color painted a poetic scene. Barnes selected works of art that responded to life as the artists experienced.

Artist and teacher who has for more than thirty years helped other artists to become recognized in the art world. She paints a poetic view of her experiences and things that interest her. She states that color as well as line is very important because it is the means she used to give an impression of what she is trying to express. She is the originator of 'Abstract Realism' which is the style she taught to her former student Barkley Hendricks.


Horace Pippin. Supper Time. BF985


G. Farrel Kellum. Shimmy Shimmy Ya. #1102
G. Farrel Kellum
My objective is to question the nature of my subject, to transform what is perceived to be uncomfortable, or even ugly into something else, that challenges the mental phenomena to make a radical interrogation of the work and to bring the viewer into harmony with my work.

A graduate of the University of the Arts, Glenn was drawn to architecture and illustration for its discipline and structure. Eventually, Glenn was confronted with the fact that architecture was ten percent drawing and 80 percent mathematics. Abandoning architecture, illustration became G's focal point giving him enough grounding to give him a clear perspective to where he wanted to go.

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Unidentified artist. Mask: Portrait of a Man with Weaving Shuttles (Mblo). A281


Natalia Cabalceta. Quietude. #1257
Natalia Cabalceta
What struck me about this painting was how lovely and peaceful the environment is. It was my first time ever seeing it, and it made me experience a similar wholeness I have felt on quiet days where I am simply passing the time doing something I love - no rushing, just being. In my piece, I wanted to express the painting and feeling in sculpture form. I pulled elements that were bold to me such as the fabric and color of Madame Monet's dress, the embroidery I imagined on it, stipple brush strokes, the embroidering table canvas, the lush greenery and even the hexagon I can see within the tops of the curtains and the frame of the painting down to the angle Madame Monet is sitting. I wanted a combination of structure and organic form as it is in Monet’s piece - the balance of these forms being truly lovely.

Natalia Cabalceta is a mixed media and digital artist currently attending the University of Pennsylvania obtaining her Bachelor's in Fine Arts. She derives her work from her experiences whether it’s remembering how it felt to be a curious child exploring the great outdoors or documenting what it’s like growing up multiracial. Her work has been shown in the Stella Elkins Gallery at Tyler School of Art and she has had the opportunity to work at Printfresh Studio, an internationally recognized textile design studio. Her goal is to create meaningful, relatable, and thought provoking work that brings people closer together.

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Claude Monet. Madame Monet Embroidering (Camille au métier). BF197


Clare Connell Fentress. Sampler. #1204
Clare Connell Fentress
Looking through the lens of Renoir's "Embroiders" (1902), "Sampler" investigates the nature of "women's work" and whether such activity inhibits existential reflection. In "Embroiders," an arrestingly colorful oil painting, three white women leisurely perform handiwork in a comfortable domestic space. They are far from the factory, the plantation, the crowded market stall—conditions other humans must endure to allow this scene of luxury; as in many of the Barnes Foundation's modernist European works, colonialism is hidden in plain sight. Yet these women, too, exist in a world of gendered labor and opportunity. Would they still be pushing their needles in and out, over and over, accumulating stitches one by one, if their sensitivity to existence were more developed? Hand crafts, like domestic work, remain gendered and are consequently undervalued both by historical narratives and the current labor market. Building on precedents such as North American colonial samplers, Ree Morton, and Louise Bourgeois, "Sampler" engages materiality, visual reference, and language to ask whether "women's work" is inherently stifling to perception or if its repetitive and physical nature, long eschewed by male structures of power, can yield space for meditative thought. Through its delicate objecthood, curious presence, and the ambiguity of its speaker, "Sampler" avoids simple commentary or confession, opening up space for both, neither, or something in between.

Clare Fentress is an artist working in Philadelphia. Her interdisciplinary practice asks questions about how perception—both individual and collective—is shaped, changed, and remade. In 2017, she was a resident at Andrea Zittel's A-Z West, Joshua Tree, California, and a Traveling Artist at Nuuk Kunstmuseum, Nuuk, Greenland. She graduated from the University of Chicago in 2012.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Embroiderers (Les Brodeuses). BF239


Kathleen Person. Cherry blossoms along the Schuykill. #1248
Kathleen Person
I chose 'Along the Susquehanna ' because I believe I have a lot in common with the artist John Kane. He was a self-taught American painter from Pennsylvania. when I saw his painting ' Along the Susquehanna ', it reminded me of one on my favorite places, walking along Kelly drive.




John Kane. Along the Susquehanna. BF946


Robert Platt. The ghost of a scissors past. #1126
Robert Platt
The object I chose from the collection is a metal pair of scissors. I am attracted to the beauty of shapes in this object. It also takes the viewer back to a time of creating by hand. My paternal grandfather worked in a suit factory in Philadelphia cutting out patterns. I'm hoping to abstract the scissors into an image that can connect with the viewer in different ways. The history that each viewer brings with them will cause a different interpretation and dialog with the collage. I hope that the piece will create communication.

I am an artist. I've been reticent to say these words. I'm also a father, son, brother, art teacher, and Lyft driver. I have always loved making and building objects and art but I have not identified myself publicly as an artist. I'm not sure why. Recently, since my teaching position was eliminated, I have been spending more time in my studio at home. My work of the last few years has incorporated special papers and the collage technique. I have a fascination with texture and surface. I think a connection with my past in working with clay and slip and glazes. I have an undergraduate degree in Geology and my master's degree in Ceramics. I have a reference for nature and the hand building of things.


Unidentified maker. Scissors. 01.19.53


i am intisar. black.female.jesus. #1137
i am intisar
i am intisar explores what it means to be black, female and free in this space and time.

Intisar Hamilton is a self-taught artist who explores the notions of place, the divine, femaleness, nature and blackness in its contemporary context. Utilizing all manner of materials, Intisar creates works based on her life experiences and encounters. North Philadelphia born, raised and current resident, Intisar hopes to positively impact the lives of children through her work as a teaching artist, “I love the look on a child’s face when you tell them their art is great, because it is” she says. Intisar believes that everyone is an artist because everyone has something to say. For her, art is not the mastery of prescribed techniques. Rather, the art is made when we truly and freely express ourselves to the world.


Unidentified artist. Corpus Christi. 01.04.59


parris stancell. no title. #1152
parris stancell
my art is inspired by soutine"s "woman in blue". working with those confronting opiod addiction the issue of deformity, gender, mental state is always in question.. what is considered "terrifying" and why? why are we so enamored with the "edgy"? what makes us uncomfortable but can't seem to look away? these are just some of the questions i come away with reflected in the work i am presenting to the barnes.. these are some of the questions i had while looking at and knowing much about soutine's life and work.

my name is parris stancell.. i have been painting and drawing in some form since coming to philadelphia in 1963 and my mother sent me to saturday school at the fleisher art memorial. in 1969 i was drafted into the service getting out in 1972. from there i lived and wroked in new york city until 1979. coming back to philly i applied to the philadelphia college of the arts.. after hardships i dropped out a yr later.in 1998 i was given an opportunity to work for the philadelphia mural arts program.. i worked as a full time artist until retiring in august of 2016.. i know work with the mural arts program as a contracting artist..


Chaim Soutine. Woman in Blue (La Femme en bleu). BF886


Ben T. Leech. Granary (after Utrillo). #1291
Ben T. Leech
This sketch of the Granary, a reinforced concrete grain elevator built by the Reading Railroad Company in 1925 on land directly behind the Barnes, is inspired by the colors and playful geometries of Maurice Utrillo’s Church of Saint-Aignan. This view is also one of the first things in the “outside world” a Barnes visitor sees after leaving the galleries, since the building is framed beautifully (and I believe consciously) by the museum’s front portal. I have long been enamored by the weirdly cubist crown of this industrial relic; it is exactly the kind of unexpected and idiosyncratic architecture that I’m most drawn to as both an artist and a preservationist. It is the kind of building that, like Utrillo’s slightly skewed church, looms overhead with an almost anthropomorphic presence. I love the idea that one might see this building in a different light after spending an afternoon at the Barnes.

Ben T. Leech is an illustrator, writer, and historic preservationist. He has taught architectural history, archival research, and building documentation at the University of Pennsylvania, Franklin & Marshall College, Temple University, and Philadelphia University, and is a regular contributor to Hidden City Daily. From 2010 to 2015, he was advocacy director for the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia. He recently founded Archivolt Press and published 36 Views of Philadelphia, a postcard book of his architectural sketches. His first solo exhibition, a cycle of works on paper inspired by the architecture of Paul Cret, opened at the Woodlands Cemetery in November 2017.

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Maurice Utrillo. Church of Saint-Aignan. BF598


B Douglas Smith. The Dance Alive. #1238
B Douglas Smith
Aside from, "The Dance II", being an awe inspiring creation, my artwork is drawn from the collaboration between Barnes and Matisse to create a large custom mural and the techniques the artist was fond of. Being that this exhibition is created from a partnership between Philadelphia Mural Arts and The Barnes Foundation, I aimed to celebrate the connection between these amazing men and their passion for form and color. "The Dance Alive", is meant to capture a moment in time when art makes us feel free to explore, reflect and come together.

I am a modern artist and Army veteran living and working in South Philly. For the past 15 years I have exhibited my abstract expressionist and urban art influenced paintings in my home city, NYC, NJ, and parts of Germany and Italy. My inspiration is born from a love of color and connecting with others. I love sharing and interpreting art, having put hundreds of paintings and sculptures into private collections. Highlights include three sculptures accepted into the Philadelphia Sculptors Juried Exhibition: Pinned, an abstract video projected at the MOMA for Abstract Currents, and most recently touring my painting of M. John Miller in "Souls Shot: Portraits Of Victims Of Gun Violence throughout the Philadelphia area. ​

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Henri Matisse. The Dance. 2001.25.50a,b,c


Debbie Lerman. Twisted Nude. #1236
Debbie Lerman
Imagine if the Barnes collection had been amassed by a women, featuring the work of women artists. This is, of course, a purely hypothetical thought experiment. There were no hugely wealthy or influential female art buyers and very few famous female artists when Barnes was collecting. Yet it's an experiment worth pursuing, especially in this #MeToo moment, as we look for new ways to define and express masculinity that do not involve stereotypical male dominance and aggression. One way, I believe, is to direct our gaze at a primary source of men’s power and their vulnerability: the male body. According to my count, there are 86 paintings and drawings of female nudes and just 9 of male nudes in the collection. That’s about a 1:9 ratio. As a Barnes resident artist I would reimagine the collection from a female perspective, with a focus on rectifying this, and other imbalances.

Debbie Lerman is an art photographer in Philadelphia, PA. She graduated from Harvard with a degree in English in 1991, and worked as a freelance writer for 20+ years. She has been studying and working in photography since 2009. From 2010 to 2015, she exhibited work at multiple venues in and around Philadelphia, and her work was featured in a group performance piece in the 2012 Philly Fringe Festival. Juried shows and awards include “Embracing Our Differences” in Sarasota, Florida, the 2016 Berlin Foto Biennale, and the 2017 Fleisher Wind Challenge Award and Exhibition.

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Amedeo Modigliani. Reclining Nude from the Back (Nu couché de dos). BF576


Edwina Brennan. After Wols. #1141
Edwina Brennan


I start with a mark, simple and straightforward, but then there is another and another, a splotch of color and some scraping. The tools are uncomplicated, but, as in any interaction, it is the relationship, that is where the intricacy begins. The drawing itself is the experience. Although my artwork is relatively large in scale, some of my drawings are quite subtle and minimal, while others are bold and expansive. The artwork unfolds, inviting the viewer to share in the conversation, looking at and responding to marks and layers as they move over the surface.

Website

Wols (Alfred Otto Wolfgang Schulze). Light Focus. BF2523


Kay Healy. Cezanne's Enamel Jug. #1193
Kay Healy
Over the last decade I have created fiber objects and installations addressing home, loss, displacement, and the relationship between people and their domestic environments. Many of these pieces are stuffed fabric screen prints of furniture from my own childhood, or based on another person’s description of objects from their past. I am interested in how objects and domestic spaces can tell stories, and that something as mundane as an armchair can embody vivid memories of people, places, and events from one’s life. I strive to make visually accessible work with a handmade aesthetic, using observational drawing to create screen printed, painted, and sewn fiber works. I have always admired Cezanne's Terracotta Pots and Flowers, not only for his exemplary use of color, but also because of the tiny white jug snugly tucked into the middle of the composition. As someone interested in objects, I immediately attributed an anthropomorphic bashfulness to this little jug and its curious placement. In this piece I chose to replicate Cezanne's enamel jug in my own painted and trapunto quilted style and force it out of the shadows and into the spotlight.

Through her life-sized drawn, screen printed, and stuffed fabric installations, Kay Healy investigates themes of home, memory, and loss. Healy is an artist and educator originally from Staten Island, NY and received a BA from Oberlin College, and a MFA from the University of the Arts. Her 350 square foot screen printed installation Coming Home, was purchased by the Pennsylvania Convention Center in 2016. She completed a 1,000 square foot installation for the Central Library of Philadelphia supported by the Independence Foundation’s Fellowship in the Arts. This project was based on stories of lost objects from interviews of over forty people from Philadelphia and the surrounding area. Healy lives and works in South Philadelphia.

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Paul Cézanne. Terracotta Pots and Flowers (Pots en terre cuite et fleurs). BF235


Wade Gregory Clark. Observation 23: The Last Cig. #1222
Wade Gregory Clark
My artwork is a response to Renoir’s pastel artwork ‘Two Nudes, c. 1897 (BF154)’. This small, simple but fascinating artwork left me wondering… What were these two nude women actually doing? Dancing, making love, wrestling…? The ambiguity set my mind racing and the image continued to linger in my mind well after leaving the gallery. Later that evening, walking in the city past the Board Game Park or “The Pit” as the local Philly skaters call it, I witnessed an argument between two women whom appeared to be suffering from a substance abuse disorder as their argument quickly turned violent over who would get to smoke the last cigarette they had in their possession. This quickly resulted with the pair wrestling to the ground and mirroring with uncanny accuracy the rolling pose in Renoir’s artwork. This juxtaposition of Renoir’s nudes and the coincidental link to “smoking a cigarette”, a theme found within many Barnes Foundation artworks, helped culminate my final painting titled ‘Observation 23: The Last Cig’.

Born in Melbourne, Australia in 1977, Wade graduated in 1999 from Monash University with a Bachelor of Fine Art where he was awarded the prize 'Most Prominent 3rd Year Painter’. In 2001 he completed a Post Graduate Dip at RMIT Uni where his final animated-work “The 5:19” was invited to debut at the Melbourne International Film Festival. From 2004 - 2012 Wade worked professionally as a commercial illustrator/Art Director but returned to painting in 2014. Over the years Wade has exhibited in both Sydney & Melbourne. In 2018 he moved to Philadelphia, USA to focus on furthering his art practice. Wade's work has been shown at the National Gallery of Victoria and is included in the collections of prominent Australian Universities RMIT and Monash.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Two Nudes. BF154


Robyn Miller. Character Ensemble - In The Garden. #1287
Robyn Miller
Character Ensemble: In the Garden Woman Walking in an Exotic Forest, painted by Henri Rousseau, spoke to me because of the subject matter and the size relationships in this painting. I am a plant lover and often include flowers and foliage in my mosaic creations. I start with a figure in the middle and create a balanced and symmetrical theme using my hand made ceramic pieces. I call my works Character Ensembles in homage to Dr. Barnes because of the symmetry. Character Ensembles bring together all my passions: mosaics, color, patterns, beads, flea market finds and my own sense of aesthetics. I relate to the height of the woman in Rousseau’s painting compared to the background of tall plants. For me, Rousseau emphasizes her importance using the size and color contrasts. I connect to this woman because of my own stature, never reaching five feet. Often I experience feeling tiny when surrounded by most people being taller than me. I have learned to transform these feelings with concentrating on my inner strength and the realization that size stature doesn’t really matter. In my interpretation I make the woman large in relation to the entire picture plane to express my view.

I create my mosaics starting with my own ceramic tiles that are in inspired from nature and reflect my passion for color, texture, shapes and patterns. I merge my clay pieces with repurposed shards of dishes, vintage knick-knacks, beads, buttons, and found objects. My goal is to create a bas-relief mosaic using aligned fragments that bring joy to the viewer and me, and expresses my personal aesthetics.

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Henri Rousseau. Woman Walking in an Exotic Forest (Femme se promenant dans une forêt exotique). BF388


Liz Krick. Muse in Revolt. #1259
Liz Krick
I have taken the Let's Connect project as an opportunity to confront the male dominated history of Western art by running it through the lens of a contemporary feminist artist. I choose the work of Renoir because it so perfectly depicts the concept of the male gaze, which has become increasingly repulsive to me as I have become more confident and experienced as both a woman and an artist. The female subject in Renoir’s "Nude in a Landscape" is the embodiment to me, of the mythological muse. The traditionally and historically female character that is the personification of the force from which male artists draw their inspiration and passion. From my perspective, the traditional depiction of the muse portrays women as submissive, one-dimensional, sexual objects that only exist to surrender their feminine powers to a great male creator. Through re-imagining Renoir's "Nude in a Landscape", I sought to give the muse both agency and ownership over her feminine power. in my interpretation of "Nude in a Landscape", we find the muse in a state of revolt, tearing pins out of her heart that represent each of her passions stolen. Although she looks away from the viewer, her engagement in this intense and symbolic gesture suggests that she has neither shame for her femininity or concern for those who would seek to possess her. She is confident in her sexuality and unafraid of owning her own power. She is the muse in revolt.

Liz Krick is a Philadelphia based artist and the current President of the Philadelphia Chapter of the Women's Caucus for Art. She studied painting at the Tyler School of Art and has been active in the local art community as both an artist and organizer for over 10 years. Her work explores themes based around female identity, loss, anger, redemption and revolution through the use of surreal characters, visceral mark making and loud color. Krick's work seeks to bring to light the depths of the female experience and to celebrate the power and potential of the feminine unleashed.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Nude in a Landscape (Nu dans un paysage). BF975


Mathilde Pateau. "The Cloth Mother". #1264
Mathilde Pateau


Mathilde Pateau is a graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Atrs. She grew up in the suburbs of West Palm Beach and much of her drawings, paintings, and installations revolve around her childhood in this area. Pateau makes images from objects that have personal value and draws inspiration from the memories attached to those belongings. Her process involves layering and erasing as a means of communicating how memory fades and resurfaces. The drawings are mostly done with a mixture of charcoal and graphite, but her most important drawing tool by far,is an eraser.


Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. A Montrouge–Rosa La Rouge. BF263


Nancy Shell. Le Jardin L'amour de ma Gramere (The Garden of Love of my Grandmother). #1180
Nancy Shell
Rousseau work places you at another place and time as if somehow you are in the past, present and future all at once. When I saw his work at the Barnes Past and Present or Philosophical thought I was immediately drawn to a photograph of my grandmother Nannie Lu. She was born late 1800's in the post civil war segregated south. Nannie Lu dressed in black dresses with lace collars just like the people Rousseau painted . Grandma kept a wonderful exotic garden in her city backyard where she grew vegetables and flowers. i painted her garden to mimic Rousseau's handiwork. Being with her was like being from another time and place. But her past was so frightful she rarely spoke of it. I learned about it one day because I was studying my French lesson. "Granny", I asked. Why do you keep repeating what I am saying", I asked annoyed. Because you keep asking me how am I doing and I told you I'm okay. Then the story came out how she was the biracial daughter of the plantation owner and her mother. The plantation owner wife hated her and would beat her if she did not speak French in the house to keep the pretense going that she was merely a ladies maid and not his daughter. She was not bitter though, you always felt her love and care by the wonderful food she prepared with her magic apron from her garden. She was a saint to me.

I am a Leeway Foundation award winning artist, Transformation Award 2015-2016 and Art and Change Award 2012-2013. I am a senior, minority, disabled ,female artist. My work centers on the themes of women, history and freedom. I am drawn to stories from the unseen and unheard . I work across disciplines including textiles painting. One work the Freedom Quilt Project Produced a 50 ft quilt to celebrated the 150th the signing of the 13th amendment to outlaw slavery in United States using the comments of 800 participants. I recently won at first prize Fleischer Art Memorial Adult Student Art Show.


Henri Rousseau. The Past and the Present, or Philosophical Thought (Le Passé et le présent, ou Pensée philosophique). BF582


Erik James Montgomery. American Teenager. #1304
Erik James Montgomery
The name of my piece is American Teenager. It corresponds with Jacques Lipchitz’s Reader II (Barnes-A205) due to my personal opinion that both pieces demonstrate the viewer's perception of personal ambiguity. The statue and the photograph are both focused on individuals we know nothing about and is difficult to figure out. In life, it seems that people more concerned with one’s exterior as opposed to the innermost workings of that person. So both of these pieces speak to the blending of the internal complexities of an individual and the exterior anonymity from outside sources.

Erik James Montgomery is a self-taught, fine art photographer who creates relevant, thought-provoking, visually unique imagery. His viewpoint is from a photojournalistic standpoint where his imagery tells a complete story in one photograph. In 2011, Erik founded The Erik James Montgomery Foundation. The EJM Foundation is dedicated to instructing at-risk youth in the artistic development of professional photography. His students learn the fundamentals of the craft as well as being introduced to entrepreneurship. The Foundation also creates public works of art for impoverished neighborhoods in order to transform blight into beauty.

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Jacques Lipchitz. Reader II. A205


raymond michael ercoli. dear georgia o'keeffe "don't worry about the matter of the refund.". #1186
raymond michael ercoli
This piece is about the power an art collector can wield over artist. Mr. Barnes purchased two Georgia O’Keeffe paintings from Alfred Stieglitz's gallery .paying with a check written out to Georgia O’Keeffe. Unfortunately for O’Keeffe, Barnes claimed he couldn’t make either painting fit in his home- museum-school collection and had to return them for a refund. Imagine you are the artist,(even more remarkable, a female artist!) selling work to Mr. Barnes, (the thrill ,validation and better still, money) only to have both of your paintings rejected and returned for refund. Look at the work Mr. Barnes collected, more specifically the work depicting women. Are women being objectified, as they hang among the hinges and bric-a-brac? It's been said that Barnes and O’Keeffe remained "friends" in spite of the return of her work. Is the artist/ collector relationship ever really friendship? The story of powerful men abusing their position is current daily news, but it is not a new story.

Raymond Ercoli is an artist, designer and arts instructor. He lives, works and continues to be inspired by Philadelphia.

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Gustave Courbet. Woman with White Stockings (La Femme aux bas blancs). BF810


Scott Schultheis . Bather Feeding Under Private Boughs. #1196
Scott Schultheis
The emotional texture that distortion can produce is a powerfully motivating factor for me as I build images. I would not have initially guessed that Cezanne would be a kindred spirit in this regard. I suspected more intimate connections to Picasso, Pippin, Rousseau, or Soutine, perhaps because I identified tendencies of their work in mine. After a couple trips to the Barnes and still feeling unsatisfied with my fruitless attachments to other paintings, I reopened a book containing some of the highlights and started to get stuck in Cezanne's Large Bathers. I was caught in just the left-most bather, whose knobby head ambiguously disappears into the trees. The curiosity of that faceless, disproportioned egg head, left that way in a large and finished work was enough of an oddity to paint from it. The author of the passage about it says that a 1904 photograph shows a different, fully resolved face and head. Evidently it evolved into something much different. Its discomfiting abruptness invokes Francis Bacon's deformed portraits as well as Caravaggio's actors, starkly cloaked or lit by shadow and light. The allusions that arise out of a fairly minor episode in the composition were a crucial point of departure. The playfulness of the aberration can grow: if you eliminate all but that figure and the reddest haired one, it is as if the latter is looking back at them, kind of stunned. Obviously this is imagined (I think?), but it made me a much more active participant in the painting. My painting posits other tactile narrative in the mystery, and blends my technical language with Cezanne's and others in the collection who I love.

Scott Schultheis is a Philadelphia based artist working predominately in painting. He holds a B.A. in Art and Art History from the University of Rochester and an MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. He has shown his work in collaborative and individual projects at alternative and traditional spaces in Philadelphia, New York, and beyond. Here in Philly, he develops community arts programming and teaches painting and drawing.

Website

Paul Cézanne. The Large Bathers (Les Grandes baigneuses). BF934


Ash Limés Castellana. Skewed Sunset. #1258
Ash Limés Castellana
Mist and light in "Fan-Mountainous Landscape," attributed to artist Wang Shimin, both obscures and emphasizes portions of the landscape. The obscurity abstracts the land, creating softly broken fields of color and form. The fields undulate, and space is warped. This piece paired along with the works of Demuth and Cezanne creates an ensemble that serves to push and pull at our physical realm, while giving hints of the natural forms observed.

Limés Castellana’s artistic practice seeks to promote a connection with ourselves and the natural world by encouraging focused attention on a limited landscape. When experiencing a natural expanse, she begins by reducing it into components. Forest, river, form, line, pattern. Looking at something so vast becomes more manageable when broken down into these parts, fading out the activity around it. Through the process of drawing and printmaking she hopes to record these observations and provide a tool for reflection.

Website

Wang Shimin. Fan - Mountainous Landscape. BF2508


Muffy Ashley Torres. Sunflower . #1226
Muffy Ashley Torres
The belief in black girl magic is necessary for all. Representation is necessary, especially when it comes to defining who and what is beautiful. The Western standard of beauty must be obliterated and replaced. This is how I choose to do so.

Born in and repping Philadelphia while having their heart on the U.S./Mexico border, Muffy Ashley Torres is a multifaceted and self taught artist with abilities focused on painting, photography, painting, poetry, and videography. When she is not covered in paint or dirt, she is a STEM educator to 4th and 5th graders. With a diagnosis of a chronic illness at a young age, Muffy found art as an extreme breakthrough to communicate and get through the physical pain she often endures. Through photography, she/they is given the opportunity to freeze moments to make a statement against the current socio-political climate. She believes visual arts have the ability to strike emotions that can pave the way for a revolution and capture the beauty wit


Unidentified artist. Peasant Girl with Hat in Landscape. BF131


H. Mcmullen. S. Teery RD and Kelly Dr. #1253
H. Mcmullen





Paul Cézanne. Gardanne (Horizontal View) (Gardanne [vue horizontale]). BF917


Michael Evans. Mang. #1243
Michael Evans


Michael Evans was born in Orlando, FL in 1985. He graduated from Southern Methodist University with a BA in Cinema/Television in 2009. In 2015 he received an MFA in painting from Maryland Institute College of Art. He currently lives and works in Philadelphia.

Website

Chaim Soutine. Landscape of Gourdon (Paysage du Gourdon). BF357


Patrice Poor. Fallen Horse. #1244
Patrice Poor
Degas' freely painted "Jockeys and Race Horses" compels me for its sense of spatial and temporal motion. It is an ephemeral moment that endures for the artist's carefully considered recording of the event.The subject of those particular jockeys and horses are otherwise no longer with us, and horses on a larger scale have been replaced by technology in the once important role that they held. I've responded to this in my painting, "Fallen Horse", painted from observation of a toy reproduction. I've painted it using encaustic wax medium to represent the fleetingness of all things, and the important act of bearing witness to the present.

Patrice Poor is a painter living and working in Philadelphia since receiving her Master of the Fine Arts degree from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Prior to that she received her Bachelor of the Fine Arts from Indiana University in Bloomington. She has been the recipient of many awards including The Dove Family Scholarship Award, the Edward L. Hutton International Experiences Program Grant, The Friends of Art Bookstore Award, Pygmalion’s Award for Excellence in Painting, Pennsylvania Academy of the Arts Merit Scholarship, and Award for Best Narrative Figure painting from Wayne Center for the Arts. She has taught workshops in portrait painting and coordinates with a weekly portrait painting session that is free to the public.

Website

Edgar Degas. Jockeys and Race Horses. BF572


BEiNG!. Art Board. #1179
BEiNG!
The artist Pedro Antonio Fresquis uses graphic shapes and linework to create a simplistic yet symbolically significant image of Mary, which has faded with time but can be imagined to have once been very bright and colorful. I identified with this piece because this style of work is very reminiscent of my own, and I thought that I could create a copy of this composition that would highlight the interesting stylistic choices made by the original artist and bring back the feeling it may have once had with bright, primary colors. I added in hints of the symbolic visual language of BEiNG! to add a personal twist to the image, but otherwise attempted to stay true to the original line work and layout. The only other significant change I made was the softening of the eye shapes in an effort to convey more compassion than sadness in the virgin Mary's eyes, which is the way i've always preferred to see her depicted.

BEiNG! is the daemon of the artist Mackenzie Merrick, expanding upon their symbolic and visual language with every piece of artwork they produce.

Website

Pedro Antonio Fresquis. Our Lady of Sorrows (Nuestra Señora de los Dolores). BF1010


J. Kas. Grandbébé II. #1263
J. Kas
“One day I was in my old studio having my meager lunch, a desperate day. I didn’t know how to get out of my difficulties. When down in my studio I heard a little bell,” Lipchitz said of Dr. Albert C. Barnes arriving at his door in Paris in 1922. Lipchitz was 31 (as am I), and in order to communicate with Barnes, he spoke Yiddish and Barnes, German. I can imagine the conversation as fragments of sentences, expressive, partially understood. Barnes bought several sculptures that day and commissioned Lipchitz to create bas-reliefs for the Foundation in Merion, changing the course of the artist’s work and life. Lipchitz made Reader II in 1919, following a crisis of creating in his 20’s. Searching for new forms, he looked to what he felt he knew intuitively from his father, a house builder in Lithuania—taking a brick and trying to make a house. He cut out and fitted together flat wooden boards, “like pre-fabricated toys”, and began to transfer the forms to stone, “where they at once acquired weight, solidity and a clean, geometric rhythm” (Henry R. Hope, The Sculpture of Jacques Lipchitz). In Grandbébé II, styrofoam pieces replace a mass of stone. There’s a flexibility, a wide-eyed lightness foregrounds traces of history, no assertion against mortality; without the subordination of parts to a whole there’s a suggestion of deconstructability. Grandbébé II is a child playing with blocks, testing their intuition about the construction of bonds.

J. Kas is an interdisciplinary performing artist and teacher living in Philadelphia.

Website
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Jacques Lipchitz. Reader II. A205


Sarah Prasuhn, SarahP.Studio, IndyHall Arts. Millenial and Child. #1270
Sarah Prasuhn, SarahP.Studio, IndyHall Arts
When I go to the Barnes I feel as if I'm flowing through multiple timelines. All while being inside someones very specific brain. Each piece connects with those around it in surprising ways. It changes our brains, these kinds of experiences that push, pull, and surprise us. And this is exactly what the Madonna and Child did for me. Madonna and Child is this glowing contrast of the darkness illuminated by the holy mother and child. I love how the lightness and strength of her contrasted with my own internal reality of motherhood. She seemed to say, I'm here doing the THING and I'm bored. And I felt so connected to this woman from 600yrs ago. In my piece, the light in the halo comes from being honest with the struggles that humans are facing today. My weariness is much more human than that of the spiritual Madonna. The busyness of my thoughts represents the added pressure on mothers in this age to do everything and still be light. The handmaiden represents women from the past protecting me by sharing their stories and strategies to guide me safely on this journey of motherhood. The colors draw from some of the more modern pieces at the Barnes that show a sense of weight and feeling vs. realism. To me this is my brain on the Barnes, I always leave with colors and stories from many ages blending into a new story to be told.

Sarah P has been a filmmaker and web-application creator for ten years, first in LA then Portland, and now in Philly. But before that she loved art. And after showing with IndyHallArts since 2015, she's ready to learn more and allow her art to grow into a bigger piece of the puzzle. She believes everyone needs to see their story told, feel the freedom of changing all the narratives, and laugh as much as they can even while crying.

Website

Hans Baldung Grien (Hans Baldung). Madonna and Child. BF316


Ronah Harris. The morning after. #1274
Ronah Harris
This is a response to the image of the painter. What would ahppen if they were together? The painter and this young girl, nude together.

I was born in New York City in 1977. I am a primarily a self taught artist. I have worked in costumes and television. I won two emmys for my work on Sesame Street. I am also an educator. I earned my doctorate in Education from Columbia University. I love to tell stories and I sculpt character and emotion from the most simple fabrics and materials. I have some privately commisioned pieces at the Princeton Museum and in personal collections.

Website

Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Henriot Family (La Famille Henriot). BF949


Georgia de Chirico. The Mysterious Stagecoach. #1289
Georgia de Chirico
My great uncle Georgio de Chirico is best known for the metaphysical paintings of deserted classical plazas he made as a young artist in the 1910’s. He later disowned not only this style but also modernism as a whole and declared himself a classicist, turning his attention to Titian-inspired scenes of horses and gladiators. (See other works in the Barnes collection, such as ‘Alexandros’ and 'Horses of Tragedy,’ both from 1935.) My great uncle also forged work in his earlier style, producing ‘neo-metaphysical’ canvases that he dated inaccurately to the 1910’s. Perhaps he did this in retaliation to the unfavorable reception of his later style by his contemporaries; perhaps he did it because the market value for work from the 1910's was higher. In my painting, I have replaced the swan in Georgio's 'The Mysterious Swan' with a stagecoach pulled by three horses, referencing the Wells Fargo logo used by the company until 2008. Wells Fargo, one of the corporate sponsors of the Barnes Collection, is responsible for opening 3.5 million fake retail banking accounts without customers’ knowledge. Wells Fargo has also drawn criticism for its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline and discriminatory lending practices against minority home loan borrowers. With this piece, I hope to draw attention to the inspiration that my great uncle has been for Wells Fargo and other banks around the world in the fine art of fraud.




Giorgio de Chirico. The Mysterious Swan. BF410


Angela Arrey-Wastavino. Pendulum Key. #1220
Angela Arrey-Wastavino
The linear balanced distribution of the artwork at Barnes Foundation, seems to melodiously intertwine to evoke patchwork or quilting in its traditional American form. Based on that concept, I designed the background of my piece, Pendulum Key. Furthermore, exploring non-traditional forms of collections, Locksmith 01.06.28 was an inspirational object. The piece, a key, whose intricate exquisite design, is presented as the main element of the composition. Symbolically, keys embody freedom or captivity; hence the perpetual motion of a pendulum as it swings back and forth without friction was the third element to convey the feeling of dynamism in this piece.

I'm a multi-disciplinary international artist, whose exploratory style covers a wide range of experimental work with traditional and unconventional materials. My multi-ethnic background has motivated me to extensively participate in multicultural art community based projects with vast diverse populations to develop their creativity, particularly enjoying working with young prospective artists. I focus on examining the creative process to project insightful images inviting the viewer to become part of the composition. In my opinion, creativity is a philosophical enigma in which the arts play a fundamental role to exteriorize feelings. Thus, I identify myself as a teaching artist.

Website

Unidentified maker. Sign for a Locksmith. 01.06.28


Jon Weary. inch by inch. #1187
Jon Weary
It is my goal to describe space in my paintings as a culmination of events that continue to unfold. In this drawing I aim to one segment in time, specifically the length of a life, represented in a fragmented "image" borrowed from Johann Adam Eyer (1784). His composition is broken down into a number of layers which perforate the linear sequence in the composition. Color, in this painting, does not describe the objects represented in the drawing. Color rather represents the sequence in which the painting was constructed: yellow=1st green=2nd red=3rd blue=4th and so on. I have always had an affinity American crafts in the 1700 & 1800's but didn't actually realize it until I was a young adult. sparked a curiosity in my own families activities. gift drawings, birth certificates, and prayer drawings by Shakers.

Born and raised in Pennsylvania, Weary lives and works in Philadelphia and graduated from Tyler School of Art in 2010. He has been a resident artist at Vermont Studio Center in Johnson, VT and at Arquetopia Foundation for Development in Puebla City, Mexico. In February He was a finalist in the 2018 Miami University Young Painters Competition juried by Michelle Grabner.

Website

Johann Adam Eyer. Cover for a Book of Copy Models (Vorschriften-Büchlein). BF936


Malik Davis,. Monsieur Davis. #1221
Malik Davis,
For the most part, I am drawn to the stories and histories of my artistic African American family heritage. My collection of African sculpture and textiles juxtaposed with the daily sensibilities of urban life provides me with artistic inspiration. I use multiple mediums such as acrylic paint and markers. This gives me more control, and mixing textures give my work more dimension. When reviewing my art, look deeper to reveal the hidden aspects, which will help you understand the true meaning. Abstract and figurative art helps me transcribe my creative life. I stepped out of my comfort zone to create this work and was drawn to the piercing eyes and movement of Renoir's, Portrait of a Man (Monsieur Charpentier).

Philadelphia native Malik Davis could have been content to rest on his laurels as a certified carpenter and auto inspection mechanic, but art has always been an integral part of his life. He went on to Wyncote Academy where it was noted that he was a gifted artist. As a child, his parents enrolled Malik and his brother at Samuel S. Fleisher Art Memorial for a few summers and on weekends. Malik comes from a creative family of artists, sculptors, musicians, and authors. He has always been in tune to the Philadelphia, New York, and Washington DC art scene. Family trips always included an art opening or museum visit. . It took a few years for Malik to develop his signature style of geometric abstract patterns which he does on paper and canvas.


Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Portrait of a Man (Monsieur Charpentier). BF987


Robert Bohne´. Daumier at Dirty Franks. #1282
Robert Bohne´
I'm very passionate about drawing everyday scenes from my favorite hangouts in the city of Philadelphia. Because of my subject matter, style and palette, I've always felt a connection to the works of Daumier. The "Lets connect" event gave me the opportunity to place the Daumier's "two drinkers" in a contemporary environment while retaining the strength of the original composition.

Robert Daniel Bohne b:1953 - Brookhaven, Pa.; Painter; PAFA, Violette de Mazia/ Barnes Foundation, Fleisher Art Memorial. Grumbacher Award, Multiple Phila. Sketch Club awards, multiple Phila. Plastic Club awards, MBNA collection, multiple Delco. Community College purchase prizes, 2015 Wayne Mid East Plein Air award, 2015 best in show Audubon Plein Air. His works are in numerous private and public collections. He is the founder of Landscape Painting Phila., a Plein Air Organization with over 400 members, runs a workshop at the Phila. Sketch Club, and he is best known for his landscapes of Phila. And the surrounding area.

Website

Honoré Daumier. Two Drinkers (Les Deux buveurs). BF1197


Olivia Rodriguez. Family Totem (after Writing Lesson (Renoir). #1247
Olivia Rodriguez
Artist Statement/Barnes Mother and child This piece was made in response to Renoir’s Mother and Child specifically, I chose it because it resonates with my current working method in which my 5 year old (Griffen) and I collaborate. The Barnes has many mother and children), paintings and sculptures. Some of the oldest portray mary and jesus. I spent my time at the Barnes with my son, when i asked him about the mother and child compositions his response was that they looked “happy”, one of his biggest questions was “what are they doing”. Until my son was born I worked alone, I started school (PAFA) when my son was 3 but never really worked with him until this past year. As a single mother/ full time student, art teacher making work can be frustrating. Our collaboration this year has resulted in a large installation greenhouse/project space which we built and numerous small projects based on exploration of philadelphia and the schuylkill watershed. I chose to sculpt the figures in to mirror work in process, as with many of the works in the Barnes Collection I am very interested in process. The shape of the work came from playing with the two figures, Griffen sculpted me and I him. The opportunity of time and space to work would be the dream of a lifetime. If selected as a resident I would love to offer workshops for families in the philadelphia community, art should be available for all people.

Olivia Rodriguez investigates cycles of decay and birth within territories, both natural and man-made. Nature is violent and so is man, exquisitely beautiful or profoundly grotesque, works that engage the viewer and promote discourse. Current projects include a Field Project (with Griffen Young), large island "Island of man", “ Hunt and Gather” concerning the culture of convenient sustenance and "Burnout" a field of meteorites (lit ceramic lamps). All work is hand fabricated, no molds or found objects. Exhibited spaces include Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Goucher College, Addison Ripley Fine Arts, Curator's Office, Automat, Heiner Contemporary, and Samson Projects.

Website

Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Writing Lesson (La Leçon d'écriture). BF150


Julia D’Alo Place. Moves & Grooves. #1239
Julia D’Alo Place


My name is Julia D’Alo Place, I grew up in Carlisle, PA. I went to Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario. I have been living in Philadelphia for 8 years.


Pablo Picasso. Angles and Curves. BF558


Stephan Dobosh. YOU TAST LIKE CITRAS . #1172
Stephan Dobosh
Symbolist methods of engaging in the “derangement of the senses” and making the unseen seen is at the core of my practice. I investigate “escapist” themes within American culture and the identity of the Artist. Using the vernacular of painting, I blur the distinction between sculpture, installation, painting, and performance by employing domestic objects, spray paint, glitter, and fabric to compose “extended paintings” and construct spaces. My work reflects my personal and artistic identity, eliciting a sensual experience that acts as an escape while making social and artistic critique.

Stephan Dobosh is a Philadelphia painter and installation artist whose studio practice employs a careful consideration of Symbolist literary devices, automatic writing, and visual free association. He uses art-making as a physical documentation of his own past experiences and state of mind. Through the subconscious psychological connections between color, sound, text, and implied imagery, he wants to provide an entrance for the viewer to be able to free associate, transforming these elements from static objects to dynamic associations. Dobosh has been selected to exhibit at Goldilocks Gallery and Kitchen Table Gallery, is a member of the Plastic Club, and holds a BFA in Interdisciplinary Fine Art from the University of the Arts.

Website

Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Lemons and Orange (Citrons et orange). BF974


Lauren Karstens, Rebecca Ebner, Allison Tirrell. Shed. #1262
Lauren Karstens, Rebecca Ebner, Allison Tirrell
The artists present a work to reinvent time and dimension, and reimagine Renoir's world, in a place where his/our character transcends into a parallel existence. Exit luscious boudoir, enter dystopian time void. Vegetation is extinct and a purpose for production and consumption are lost beyond daily survival. The character abandons silk night robes for crystal scales and a shimmering evening gown. Glamour is a forbidden comfort. The piece is a visual reaction and investigation to the character within Renoir's "Rising (Le Lever)." The artists asked themselves: Is she rising from sleep? Or is she going to bed? Is she in a hurry? Is the hurry due to something forbidden? Who could she be to Renoir? About The Artists: The three Philadelphia based artists frequently collaborate on photo projects using photography, fashion, and experimental make up design to create conceptually focused compositions and editorials. Their work dreams in a world beyond era and individualism, placing importance on collective creation.

Lauren Karstens is an artist, producer and events curator. Currently, she is fascinated with self portraiture practiced through team production- by enacting characters visually designed to empower and celebrate the human figure. Rebecca Ebner is a textiles and garments artist specializing in experimental fashion. Her designs playfully investigate the use of fur and plastics and she is currently working on a initiatory collection for The Likes of You, her independent fashion brand. Allison Tirrell is a photographer and Chemical Engineer. She works in 35mm and medium format film photography and produces gracefully composed images created with depth and reason.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Rising (Le Lever). BF232


Sophie Hinkle. The Socks. #1158
Sophie Hinkle
This piece was inspired by "The Venetian Blinds" and other works by Matisse that portray women sitting and reading alone. I tried to recreate the sense of feminine solitude and freedom that these paintings convey through my own existence and artistic spirit.

Sophie has been experimenting with various art forms throughout her life and has recently found a connection to painting. She tries to demonstrate her individual nature in all of her work.


Henri Matisse. The Venetian Blinds (Les Persiennes). BF897


Jas M. Morris. Untitled (Collaged Figure Drawing on Wood). #1225
Jas M. Morris
Untitled (Collaged Figure Drawing on Wood), 2018 Conte Crayon, Charcoal, New Print and Magazine clippings My piece was inspired by Picasso's earlier works (mostly quick figure drawings) created in Barcelona; many of which reminded me of gesture drawings I created during my fashion drawing courses. Using two pieces (BF207, BF558) as the basis for my work; I wanted merge both Picasso's figure drawings with his cubist work that he is most known for.

Philadelphia based fashion and mixed media artist. Currently a member of the Barnes Foundation's Visitor Services team; and has freelanced with local designers, assisting with garment construction and fashion show production. Moore College of Art Alumnae, class of 2012 with BFA in Fashion Design with a minor textile and business.


Pablo Picasso. Nude in Profile (Femme nue de profil). BF207


Jinie Park. Phrase . #1242
Jinie Park


Jinie Park was born in 1987 in Seoul, South Korea. She lives and works in Philadelphia. She received her MFA in 2015 from the Maryland Institute College of Art and BFA from Seoul National University in Seoul, South Korea. She had solo shows including Little House at Elizabeth Leach Gallery (Portland, OR); Observation in Paints at Scott Center (Westminster, MD); Reap/Sow Hamilton gallery (Baltimore, MD); Mobility at Elizabeth Leach gallery (Portland, OR); and From a Number at Great White Wall gallery (Baltimore, MD). Recent exhibitions include 2017 Jeju Biennale, (Jeju Island, South Korea); Inverse Variants at Lazy Susan Gallery (New York, NY); Back to School Season at Steven Harvey Fine Art Project (New York, NY).

Website

Henri Matisse. Le Bonheur de vivre, also called The Joy of Life. BF719


Sam Binder. untitled 52. #1269
Sam Binder
My process uses epoxy resin as a binder with pigments to create a durable paint that allows layering and luminescent effects. This piece is inspired by the work of Soutine, in particular, Group of Trees, in gallery 11. Using complementary colors with traces of light and dark, this work strives for the expressionistic qualities that permeate his works. Using a vertical format with shapes arranged to mimic the outline of trees, I am presenting an organic arrangement that to me expresses the beauty and vividness of a forest. Though not as foreboding or ominous as Soutine's work, I have striven to represent a more harmonious image that is less jarring and more meditative, while retaining the feeling of movement and mystery.

Studied sculpture, painting at PCA, 1979-1980. Graduate PAFA 1986- printmaking and sculpture. Studied at Barnes Foundation, 2015-2017.


Chaim Soutine. Group of Trees (Groupe d'arbres). BF331


Alec Rogers. Other. #1223
Alec Rogers
cyanotype on archival watercolor paper



Website

Pablo Picasso. The Ascetic (L' Ascète). BF115


Kelly McQuain. Mind, Heart, Soul (après Vincent). #1295
Kelly McQuain
Albert C. Barnes didn’t collect work based on historical or social context; he assembled his works as a testament to the pleasure of form. Barnes’ method, however, poses a dilemma for contemporary artists: in this Age of (overwhelming) Information, is it possible to create work apart from the context from which it rises? I’m drawn to a painting like Van Gogh’s The Postman not only because of its virtuoso brushwork but also because of its unintentional commentary on so many things: the bearded hipsters of my Philly neighborhood; the fact that few people write letters anymore; the way internet businesses have staved off the Postal Service’s obsolescence; that Philadelphia has offered massive tax incentives to lure Amazon.com’s new headquarters here—a bid that could turn life here on its head. I like art that talks to me and keeps the conversation moving forward. The Barnes Collection does this, whether its founder intended it to or not. When Albert Barnes paired paintings with old hinges and primitive sculptures, he created a series of “eye rhymes”--visual pairings that call to each other and echo back. In doing so he created a living conversation about art, one that surmounts time. I’m inspired by the collection’s interplay of forms as well as its interplay of ideas. I believe that Barnes’ singular arrangement is a conceptual artwork itself. It teaches me to see the times I’m living through in new ways and to curate my life carefully. Barnes’ collection teaches me to honor the old, reflect my now, and imagine a future. That feels like a fragile message, but it’s one that needs delivering.

Kelly McQuain is an artist and poet who combines words and pictures in poems, essays, book covers, comics, and large-scale canvases. His collection, Velvet Rodeo, won the Bloom Poetry Prize, and his work appears in numerous journals. He has twice held Fellowships from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. Recent projects include a series of Poetry Portraits that have appeared on the cover of Fjords Review. The painting series was inspired by Barnes artist Charles Demuth, whose watercolor poster portraits of famous contemporaries included the likes of Georgia O’Keeffe and William Carlos Williams. When he’s not painting, McQuain teaches creative writing, literature, and film studies at Community College of Philadelphia.

Website

Vincent van Gogh. The Postman (Joseph-Étienne Roulin). BF37


Benjamin Gordon. Patrice painting. #1284
Benjamin Gordon
I was immediately struck by the sanguine warmth of Renoir's 'Girl Darning'. It seems to invite the viewer to huddle to another's creative efforts as if to a hearth. However, skeptical of Renoir's pleasant sensual invitation, I wanted to privilege the privacy of the subject's activity so that the purpose of her efforts remain undisclosed and solitary-to emphasize the quiet and unknowable detachment of a mind at work rather than its participative radiance.

Chicago born Philadelphia residing


Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Girl Darning (Femme reprisant). BF114


Anita J. Brodsky. Still Life (in shades of umber). #1191
Anita J. Brodsky
When I visited the Barnes Collection (2 times), I determined to find which piece would stand out to me in each room without preconceived notions. A fascinating journey. Each time the various still lifes drew me in and in particular the George Braque Still Life (BF547) It's shape, it's creative simplicity, and it's use of color were all at once beautiful to me...is it gold, is it tans...? The enormity of how each one can express the same object; an apple, a vase, a dish,...inspires the opportunity. Art as a means of vision has always drawn me. "...to see as the artist sees." (Dr. Albert C. Barnes). The irony of "still life" to me is that they are so alive, and moving, and each one can find a story of their own behind the settings. And so out to prepare a work in shades of one color to have the work I self tell it's own story.

I was born and raised in Philadelphia, PA; the 13th of 15 children. I attended John W. Hallahan Catholic High School For Girls and Chestnut Hill College where I studied Art and Liberal Arts. I am Veteran of the U.S. Air Force and am honored to serve Veterans for the last 30 years at the Department of Veterans Affairs.


Georges Braque. Still Life - Tans. BF547


Jenn Warpole. After Picasso. #1183
Jenn Warpole
Picasso is still my favorite painter. His paint handling is deliberate, nuanced and yet still somehow easy. I think if it is possible to make a perfect painting, Picasso has achieved it. Sometimes when I am struggling with a painting, I come to the Barnes and compare a black and white photo my piece to a black and white photo of a painting in the collection and in this way I am able to see again. Acrobat and Young Harlequin is one I return to often.

Jenn Warpole is an artist whose paintings combine the qualities of both abstract and representational art. She is a graduate of The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, receiving her Certificate in 2007 and her MFA in 2009. Her awards and residencies include the J. Henry Scheidt Travel Scholarship, The Coverly-Smith Prize awarded by the Woodmere Museum of Art and a 2015 residency with the Vermont Studio Center. Her work has been selected for solo exhibition at B. Sakata Garo in Sacramento, CA and Church Street Gallery in Westchester, Pa. Her group exhibitions include, The Woodmere Art Museum, Avery Galleries and Gross McCleaf Gallery.

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Pablo Picasso. Acrobat and Young Harlequin (Acrobate et jeune Arlequin). BF382


ElReco Ramon. Ex-Factor. #1265
ElReco Ramon
Communicating an illusion out of thin air is oxygen and spirituality.

Painting is oxygen I went through a lot regarding mental challenges. Creativity is a major part of my foundation as an over comer. I have a romance with painting that allows me to express and release who I am, what I've become, and how I feel. My work consist of many narratives that expose the truths of audio frequencies, my current identity, and past trials. I work mostly with acrylics and my own personal photos recycled as an added intrinsic effect. I see in art parallels of surrealism at times regarding the spiritual realm and subconscious. I also create art that circles around my other passions. Radio broadcasting, audio, music, kings, dogs, spirituality, and nature.

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Joan Miró. Group of Women (Groupe de femmes). BF1188


Athena Panton. Empty Shore. #1160
Athena Panton
I was fascinated by the brush strokes in Marblehead Harbor. I wanted to emulate the gloppiness of the piece while inserting colors that are atypical to the scene.

I am very new to art. I mostly make abstract pieces, but I wanted to push myself for this competition. Most of my artistic focus is on developing the skill to do intricate landscapes in abnormal colors.

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Maurice Brazil Prendergast. Marblehead Harbor. BF216


K. Warhaus. The Apparition (You are a Queen but let me Say Something). #1288
K. Warhaus
I found it difficult to stick to just one piece for inspiration when painting this submission. Both the Apparition of the Virgin and Child to Saint Hyacinth by El Greco and the Confessional Cage (01.03.32) situated on the same wall in 3 East vibed with each other form-wise (a la Barnes method) and I wanted to emphasis that with a reboot of Apparition based off of pure memory of the piece. I think pure memory in the case of creating this submission was important because it forced me to really be mindful of what forms and shapes stood out to me. Form, form, form!!

K. Warhaus is a recent transplant from the tight knit and growing St. Louis, MO art scene. Influenced heavily by zine culture, low brow humor, and animation- she has to create something or she'll surely die. Erratic lines and stupid, relatable themes are the norm for this artist. She's looking to expand into film production and turn her ideas into silver screen monsters.

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El Greco (Domenikos Theotokopoulos). Apparition of the Virgin and Child to Saint Hyacinth. BF876


shari tobias. Amphora. #1302
shari tobias
The specific item that inspired me: Geometric Amphora, c. 770–750 BCE. Ceramic, Overall: 16 5/8 x 10 1/8 in. (42.2 x 25.7 cm). A59. Utilitarian Amphora were widely used for storage and then routinely discarded, just as plastic containers are today. I chose to create an experimental sculpture in the Craft tradition using a modern synthetic material (woven recycled caution tape) coiled into the shape of an amphora, as both a representation of an ancient functional form and post modern critique. It is predicted that soon there will be more plastic floating in our oceans than aquatic life. The caution tape is a plea for awareness, specifically the prolific use of plastics and polymers that are polluting the world's oceans and serves as an admonition to our casual environmental destruction. The juxtaposition further references the Barnes collection as a whole and how one is encouraged to view the connection of multiple artifacts of various media from different time periods.

Philadelphia artist educator, Shari Tobias, concentrates in murals, installation spaces, paste-up street art( #tagyourblock ), and screen printed soft sculptures. A Fine Arts graduate of UArts and an Art Education graduate of Moore College of Art and Design, she presently teaches in the School District of Philadelphia.

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Unidentified artist. Geometric Amphora. A59


Isabel Uria. Philadelphia Skyline (Limited View). #1231
Isabel Uria
Cezanne painted beautiful pictures of the landscapes that surrounded him. In turn, I wanted to utilize my medium of choice, paper, to depict the place I am surrounded by every day. I recently moved to Philadelphia, and have been living here for a little over a year. I find this city to be full of energy. There is something to explore around every corner, and a vibrancy in the urban landscape. There are things that fit the mold and things that break the mold. There is a sense of great pride from the people living here, and love for the place they live in. It’s a beautiful thing to be a part of! Almost every day I walk outside, I find myself looking up, always looking up. I observe the geometry and shapes the buildings make in correlation to one another, the interaction of straight lines and jagged lines and subtle curves, and all the things that are pointing to the sky: aiming to reach for the highest clouds. This is the beauty I find in this landscape of concrete and steel. I draw inspiration from this city, like Cezanne drew from the Village of Gardanne.

Isabel Uria loves paper! And she loves design, too! These two passions are conveyed in her dimensional paper works and pop-ups. She holds a BFA in Visual Communication Design from the Art Academy of Cincinnati (2008) and an MFA in Graphic Design form the Maryland Institute College of Art (2011)./Originally from Ecuador, Isabel has also lived in Bolivia and France. She likes to travel and believes her life and work have been heavily influenced by her multicultural experiences./Most recently, she was the 2017 recipient of a Louie Award under the ‘General Invitations’ Category for one of her pop-up card designs./Currently, Isabel freelances full-time and teaches workshops on paper engineering. She resides in Philadelphia, PA, with her husband.

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Paul Cézanne. Gardanne (Horizontal View) (Gardanne [vue horizontale]). BF917


Oluwafemi. The Pilot. #1272
Oluwafemi
"Il Novici" speaks to my love of abstraction and of lines. In it I see a person leaving some type of home to experience the outside. It inspired me to think of the many ways in which one might try to leave the comforts of their regular lives to attain a higher level of being. The subject in "The Pilot" is leaving the confines of rigidity, growing new wings and flying forward towards the future.

I am a music and visual artist based in Philadelphia, by way of Central New Jersey, by way of Lagos, Nigeria. Art, to me, is a necessary super-language. It communicates our thoughts when common conversation cannot. I have been making visual art for over 8 years, using ink, computer and sometimes photographs, most times a combination of the two former. Rhythm and repetition are my biggest influences, I am heavily attracted to the ubiquity and necessity of patterns. Every single part of our world could not exist without some form of repeated action. My work is a continuous exploration of the various ways in which patterns can communicate. My mission is to inspire that same wonder in others.

Website

Afro. The Novice (Il novizio). BF2548


Inga Kimberly Brown . Young Woman Holding Calm . #1250
Inga Kimberly Brown
Inga Kimberly Brown Artist Statement www.ingakimberlybrown.com My submission " Young Woman Holding Calm" is my direct response and dialog to and with Pablo Picasso's " Young Woman Holding a Cigarette". I felt the need to dialog with Picasso about time and era and the idea that a forward, independant woman of his time has evolved even further today in 2018. The cigarette is deemed unhealthy today and is replaces my the calming effect of cannibas sativa. The young woman's breast are bare in my painting, relating to my own bouts with breast cancer. In the painting her independence in note worthy, in the manner and forwardness of a young woman today. I also chose a different perspective, up close and personal, which is a total different perspective than Picasso's. I painted my piece with oil paint on a space blanket mounted on canvas. The material which mirrors alumnimum foil mounted on the canvas. This talks of the painters reflection, which is now myself, a woman. I feel that would make Picasso warm inside, being that he has been called a womanizer of his time. My recent works are oil paintings on sewn canvas panels and un sewn canvases on which a hybridization takes place through the implementation of three-dimensional objects that are either sewn on or attached with adhesive, threads, and paint, along with organic materials such as eggshells and holy water. I combine seed beads, faux grass, and 24-karat gold leaf, as well as oil on wooden extensions of the canvas. The work shows elements of ritual and tradition. This piece shows reflection.

I was born Inga Kimberly Brown in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the year 1970. I grew up in West Mt. Airy. I came to love painting as a child, beginning with water colors. At the age of 13 I graduated from water colors to oil paint while attending the Creative and Perfoming Arts High School. After living in New York and attending the School of Visual Arts and The Fashion Institute of Technology I did not finish because I had breast cancer but fought it twice and won. After cancer I live in Florence and Milan, Italy for 7 years. I then came back and attended The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and recieved my Bachelors of Fine Art . I then went to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for my Masters of Fine Art.

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Pablo Picasso. Young Woman Holding a Cigarette (Jeune femme tenant une cigarette). BF318


Katherine Parker. Proof of Existance. #1205
Katherine Parker
The painting I chose by Henri Matisse depicts two people appearing bored seated intimately around a table. It is hard to recognize the boundary between the outside and the inside and the two characters stare at the viewer, acknowledging them. The two elements simultaneously take the painting and its vitality (the table has fruit, water and flowers on it) beyond the canvas. And yet, at the same time, there is much about it that reminds us of what it is: paint on a canvas. The painting is aware of its own medium due to the drips of paint coming down off the leaves of the flowers, the abstract colors, and the noticeable paint stokes. With the characters expressions there is maybe indifference but also oneness with their surrounding and a certain surrendering to it, seemingly a lack of worry and constraint: freedom. The cognizance of Matisse’s painting inspired me to make a response about my own work that incorporates themes I currently deal with in my practice: trauma and femininity. My piece, titled “Proof of Existence”, addresses why I make art. To conclude if I could say one thing to Albert Barnes it would be, “after all is said and done, there are many directions to take when learning but first one must accept their humanity to really be able to see”.

Katherine is 23 years old and moved to Philadelphia last December upon graduating from Bennington College. During college she studied percussion and songwriting as well as animation/video and anthropology. Before college attended Fiorella H. LaGuardia HS of Music, Art and Performing Arts in NYC and majored in visuals and computer graphics. She is interested in creating artwork that tells accurate stories of characters living within society intersectionaly and working on continuing to claim her own story of growing up in the face of hardship. Her art takes on a realistic and intimate nature and is most successful when it explores the medium within itself.

Website

Henri Matisse. Two Young Girls in a Red and Yellow Interior (Deux fillettes, fond jaune et rouge). BF2075


Allison Zito. 7.25 and Other Crimes; a Cry for Help. #1286
Allison Zito
The Bosch painting spoke to me. It seems as relevant today, as it was 500 years ago. The national minimum wage devalues labor and is disintegrating our society. I feel strongly that we must provide employment with a living wage to all people. It will encourage more people to join the working community. It will create a sense of pride in our workforce and ensure workers are able to support local businesses. A living wage will discourage illegal activity and a proud workforce creates a stronger community. 7.25 shows the de-evolution of our society. The Emperor’s new clothes are imaginary as he tweets from the comfort of his vehicle (a rat). His leadership has brought us closer to Johnathan Swifts satiric essay as he serves up the children of the poor. St. Anthony points to the writing on the wall; there are bodies on the ground from the latest school shooting, farming in a hazmat suit and nuclear fall out. This is my cry for help. By Allison Zito

Allison Zito received a Bachelors of Fine Arts Degree from the University of the Arts. Her artwork has been exhibited in numerous museums including The Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield MA, The Delaware Art Museum, The Pennsylvania State Museum in Harrisburg, and The Philadelphia Museum of Art. “I want to make a statement with my art. I would like this beautiful planet to remain so; for all our children and all the generations to come. I’d like my work to create a dialog for change, for a sustainable society and planet.”


Hieronymus Bosch. Temptation of Saint Anthony. BF962


Rebecca Ledbetter. Incandescence. #1213
Rebecca Ledbetter




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Paul Cézanne. Young Man and Skull (Jeune homme à la tête de mort). BF929


Rashidah Salam. Kain. #1200
Rashidah Salam
I've always been intrigued working with vibrant colors, patterns and layering techniques. I react to the events, to the people, good and bad things that had happened in my life and in the life that is surrounding me through an intense layers of images and motifs and vivid colors in my work. This is my way of recording and re-telling the events that has touched me.

My name is Rashidah Salam. I was born and raised in Malaysia and am now residing in Philadelphia. I teach at Drexel University and Philadelphia University. I have participated in local and international art exhibits and have won a few major awards in art competitions. My interest is in painting, sculpture and mixed media. Throughout my artistic career, I have won several majors awards nationally and internationally. I have won Emerging Artist titles from Malaysia Special Jury Award, Malaysia Young Contemporary Art Show, competition and exhibition, National Art Gallery, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 19 and USA, Richard Nixon Memorial Award, 77th Annual CCA, Members Show, Cheltenham Center for the Arts, Cheltenham, Philadelphia, PA, 2018.


Édouard Manet. Laundry (Le Linge). BF957


Dot Vile. found object study #1. #1207
Dot Vile
While walking through the collection, I was drawn to the found objects accompanying the paintings. I did not know much about Albert C. Barnes but learned about his way of placing these objects based on their aesthetic rather than their function. I admired that. In my art practice, much of my material is found in thrift stores or trash picked. I began to think of my own collection of found objects, from bricks to birds nests, and considered any visual relationships they have with each other. While mentally picturing two particular objects, I came to a stop when I saw Washerwoman and Child. The home and femininity are major themes in my work and, as such, I was already drawn to the subject matter of Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s paintings. I was struck by the visual harmony in this piece, between the warm and cool colors and the interaction of woman and child, and their faces turned toward and away from the viewer. In response, I borrowed the color palette as I paired two objects found while walking through my North Philadelphia neighborhood. A shell is a dwelling place which opens and shuts. A traffic cone cautions. Their gentle concave and convex forms are both inviting and protective, like this woman and child.

Dot Vile is a visual artist who works with textiles and found objects to create sculptural forms referencing the home, the body and femininity. She earned her BFA in Fiber from The University of the Arts in 2013. Her work has shown nationally and internationally, namely in Philadelphia, Chicago, New York and Seoul. She was an Emerging Artist in Residence in the Sculpture Department at Millersville University and a received a full scholarship to Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. Most recently, she was featured in the International Fiber Art Fair at the Hangaram Art Museum and GoggleWorks Center for the Arts. Dot has been published in Surface Design Journal, Broadly by Vice, A Women's Thing and The Art Blog.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Washerwoman and Child (La Blanchisseuse et son enfant). BF219


Carly Reed Scott. Hatchling Garden. #1251
Carly Reed Scott
My inspiration was the Navajo jewelry collection at the Barnes. I was imagining each necklace as a living creatures with crescent mouths and turquoise eyes. Hatchling Garden is an idea of origin, the first stages of their lifecycle. Each little bead is carrying a silver insect waiting for the perfect moment to pop.

Born in Lincoln Nebraska, and an inhabiter of many states afterwards, Carly now lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She received her Associates Degree from Burlington County Community College, and her Bachelors of Fine Arts from Tyler School of Art at Temple University. Carly works with multiple materials but has recently been working exclusively with yarn and fabrics. She refers to her work as "textile paintings", using scale, detail, and image to translate ideas of anxiety and restlessness in relation to the body.

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Unidentified Maker. Bracelet. A55


zachary. Shoreline: Dawn. #1252
zachary
For the last 3 years my work has focused on shorelines as liminal spaces full of possibility and surprise. If we move beyond conventional American colloquialisms to say that the island is a beautiful metaphor for the individual, then the shoreline stands in for the major point of contact that our bodies/selves have. The shore is where I can simultaneously feel the most alone, and the most connected to the world. Georges Seurat's painting "Four Boats at Grandcamp" makes me feel that same optimistic loneliness...so I have used this beautiful painting as a departure point to continue my explorations of shorelines while exploring this wonderful feeling of lonely connection.

zachary is a multi-disciplinary artist from Puerto Rico who holds an MFA in Studio Art from Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and a BFA in Printmaking from Pacific Northwest College of Art. As a teaching artist, community engagement is a large part of his practice, and he has taught workshops throughout the U.S., as well as in Germany and Bangladesh. In 2016 he founded the Institute for Abstract Savagery in Philadelphia, PA; the institute fosters dialogue about where we find ourselves currently as Americans, hosts readings and artist discussions, and shows works of art. zachary has called Philadelphia home since 2014, and he is currently working as a teaching artist with PAEP.

Website

Georges Seurat. Four Boats at Grandcamp (Quatre bateaux à Grandcamp). BF1185


Asiana Kani Lei Ouk. On Display. #1234
Asiana Kani Lei Ouk
The woman portrayed in the original Haere Pape, by Paul Gauguin, is the focal point of the piece. Although she is in her homeland he eyes are downcast as she goes about her day. Just by being painted she is subjected to the male gaze, and as viewers we project our own gaze as well. She is on display, hence the title. Aside from the initial inspiration for the piece, reclaiming the gaze as a woman of color, I wanted to also work with the hint of surrealism that Gauguin had in the bottom left section of the painting. the twig that stands upright, and the shadow that is cast as a result. Both are very otherworldly, and to continue that I put the objects of the Barnes Foundation that are with the painting in the landscape rooms space. I was working with three ideas, first;bringing the original landscape to the foreground while also preserving the original look and the new contemporary space that it lives in today. Second: Confusing the viewer using surrealism by making them question what is reality, and what isn't. Third: Redrawing a woman of color as a woman of color to show how the narrative of the piece changes, or if it does at all. Does it? It's all about perspective.



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Paul Gauguin. Haere Pape. BF109


Christopher T Wood. Haere Here. #1246
Christopher T Wood
Haere Here is a speculative study questioning how issues confronting people of Tahiti now compare with those of Gauguin's time. Consider this work though a lens of colonialism, capitalism, tourism, or climate change, for instance.

Interests flavoring current studio research include Hyperobjects, 'Pataphysics, and Zen Buddhism. Christopher is currently working on a drawing as hyperobject - a work that is massively distributed in time and space through a daily drawing practice. He has traveled for residencies in Iceland, Ireland, and Maryland, and in the last few years has presented talks at numerous institutions, including Cornell University, James Oliver Gallery, DaVinci Art Alliance, Jefferson University, and Rowan University. Christopher has a BFA in Illustration from University of Dayton, an MFA in Painting from Northern Illinois University, and is a member of the College of 'Pataphysics.

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Paul Gauguin. Haere Pape. BF109


Frank Abbott. "From the Palm of Our Hands, Nourishment". #1308
Frank Abbott
Community and vulnerability; in my career as an educator, my practice as an artist, and my navigation of social identity, these themes remain constant. Art itself is transient–causing and creating connections & relationships, always subjectively defined and consumed. In my work, I recognize the importance of the role my works are positioned to play. It's a necessarily responsible practice, through which I take my personal spaces–my tragedy, my blackness, my masculinity, my fragility, my love, and my personhood–and present it for public consumption. In art and in education, I attempt to reach a public audience and give seeds of ideas for growth, health, and good condition. It is shared with the intent to create community, inspire relationships, and give strength to action. With hope, and with love, my art is presented to an audience with intent and openness, so that through their consumption and interaction with my work, community and vulnerability can be made manifest.



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Horace Pippin. Giving Thanks. BF990


Joe Stephens . New Season . #1296
Joe Stephens
Colorfield Lyricalabstraction post painterly abstraction 3D shaped formats nature painting all fit within the last 50 years of my artist life.you might call it an Artist addiction.more work has been lost then saved with circumstances beyond my control such as a 2003 Tornado that ripped the roof off my Northern Catskill Mountain Studio,and removed my life's work while I was wintering in NYC. We always have today, and that's all that matters.

Born in Brooklyn NY 1949 Attended School of Visual Arts Lived in Soho district running a theater,and art studio.lived in the Yale Forest in Connecticut for 15 years,showed at The Aldridge Museum, Paul Melton Arts Center,Wadsworth Atheneum, was an artist in residence for the Connecticut Commission on the Arts,also received artist Grant from Conn Commission, and was a state Rep for the National Endowment for the Arts.was Technical Director at Annhurst College, Woodstock Conn.The artist in the Barnes Foundation named Howard Rackliffe accession BF523 lived at my farm when ever he needed housing, which was often.I also hired him as an artist in residence at Annhurst College.He introduced me to many art connections IE:shows and collectors.

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Paul Cézanne. The Spring House (La Conduite d'eau). BF129


Afaq. guardian. #1276
Afaq
I am a Sudanese woman and former refugee. When I go to museums and galleries in search of what is me or mine, I can only find artifacts that were stolen from me and mine. I often find that the only Africans represented in major museums come in the form of floating heads we call masks. In this self portrait, I too am a floating african head that was plucked from its country and brought to this one. Like the mask, I am put on display and consumed by those who don’t understand me. Like the mask, I was displaced without consent.

Afaq is a Philly based daughter, with grandmother tendencies. Assembled in Yemen (from Sudanese parts), Afaq considers herself a global citizen of her own country. She is an artist, activist, and educator who seeks to love the world until it loves her back.


Unidentified artist. Reliquary Guardian Head (Añgokh-Nlô-Byeri). A150


Marianne Coots. Visceral Ribbon. #1266
Marianne Coots
I found myself drawn to Susan Cray's Cut Out during my trips to the Barnes. Her piece stood out to me for several reasons. I love how her choice of medium distinguishes her from the rest of the collection yet evokes similar feelings of some of the other artists. It reminds me of finding connection or vibrational alignment in unexpected places. I felt comfort, beauty, love and a sense of otherworldliness in her idyllic piece. I chose to work outside of my usual mediums...twice. My initial submission had an accident (oil painting) so I was forced to start over last night (5/4). My piece is an illustration done in gold leaf over acrylic paint. In some ways I feel this final piece evokes similar feelings to Susan Cray's Cut Out because of the connection in unexpected places. Let's Connect is an exciting opportunity for everyone involved to honor Mr. Barnes and his legacy. As a person who has worked steps from the original location of the Barnes Foundation for over ten years...this project has a special place in my heart.



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Susan Cray. New Jersey Cut-Out. BF1182


Barbara K. Smolen. First Lady. #1299
Barbara K. Smolen
Modigliani's dark, differently colored or blank eyes have always haunted me in his otherwise beautiful and sensuous images of women. The eyes of his women are non-seeing representations of the idea of vision, without the capability to see. No iris, no pupil. I find that Melania, our current First Lady, has the same contradictory appealing sensuality combined with a threatening vacancy in the eyes. The window into the soul of our first lady is shut and no one, except perhaps her benefactor (Putin?) can see into that void.

I have been a muralist in Philadelphia for the past 20 years. My artistic practice has centered on social justice. My art has touched on gun violence, immigration, food insecurity and religious intolerance. Surprisingly, the current administration in the White House seems to exacerbate all these problems rather than solve them. I find Modigliani and put in to a new con


Amedeo Modigliani. Reclining Nude from the Back (Nu couché de dos). BF576


Gina Lee. The United One. #1307
Gina Lee
In the Seated Couple (Room 22, A197), the role of a man and a woman in Dogon society is complementary. The Dogon offers a view of cosmos ideas that belong to reproductive biology. The Dogon’s myth explains the creation of the universe how life is created in the womb of the world; we have images of the egg and the sperm. The four-legged bench and the four legs of the couple creates the number eight, which relates to Dogon cosmology and the four Nommo pairs. One part of woman’s face is a side view looking at the man and the other half that looks at us, thus allowing viewers to approach the woman from different perspectives. For me, lines not only define contours but also convey solidity to the volume, enclosed between the contours. An example of this is the male’s forearms and hands as a unit to touch the female breast and his penis and form connections. The pearls represent the eggs and fertility, and the lines illustrate the endless life that expands from the beginning to the eternity. The stones and glass are all elements that symbolize the glory of our human existence and the enlightenment of our future. The stone’s color is perceived as part of the structure of the stone, the grayness and the solidity are felt as a single reality. The frame, the arm strokes, the Hematite line, the pink neon penis etc. are the lines and space-compositions are the intervals, the relations of distance as a unit. There is a duality between the male and female; the beauty and the tension between them, mirror yet distinct from each other. We need to be in harmony with one another, the unity one. An installation.

Gina Lee is a multidisciplinary artist who has worked in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, and installation. Her practice involves extensive research, in projects guided by an interest in systems of classification and site-specific. Her medium involves acrylic, oil, semi-precious, precious and natural stones, ink, glass beads, pearls, electronics materials, wood, and metal. She enjoys combines in different form languages into her own. Gina Lee received her M.F. A. In 2017 from Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia. She had studied in New York Studio School and graduated from Brandies University, Waltham, Massachusetts.

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Inagaki. Seated Couple. A197


Diane Pepe. Vitality of color and mark. #1297
Diane Pepe
Cezanne's joy of the color and mark is inspirational. His intermix of warm colors surrounded by cool colors is what interested me. His abstraction of the energy of the flowers and the abstract quality of his mark is vital to his work.

Diane Pepe has exhibited in various venues such as The Woodmere Art Museum, Chestnut Hill, PA; Brindle Gallery, Camden, ME; Marian Locks Gallery and Dolan-Maxwell Gallery in Philadelphia, PA; The Houston North Gallery, Lunenburgh, Nova Scotia, The Palmer Museum, State College, PA; The Delaware Center For Contemporary Art, Wilmington, De. and The Philadelphia Art Alliance, Philadelphia, PA. Pepe is the recipient of numerous grants including the Arts In Education Fellowship funded by the NEA with support by The Getty Center in the Arts, Washington D.C.; The PA Council on the Arts Special Projects Grant; The National Science Foundation and The Ford Foundation Research grants from PSU.

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Paul Cézanne. The Flowered Vase (Le Vase Fleuri). BF44


Juan Bustamante. Al Principio. #1301
Juan Bustamante
Employing lines and organic forms with organic medium. Organic material consists of leftovers from tea or coffee making. Turmeric, elderberries, hibiscus, and ginger for tea making. Inspired by Afro, The Novice because of the design of the composition and the subtle color usage which I’ve tried to emulate in a concise way.

Lines and design.


Afro. The Novice (Il novizio). BF2548


Chris Bell. Study of Mask-Portrait of Man with a beard. #1294
Chris Bell
This acrylic painting refers to Mask- Portrait of a Bearded Man. Since much of modern art was inspired by African art I decided to take an African mask and paint it in a modern style by simplifying and flattening the form and using complementary colors to transform the mask.

I am a writer who has returned to studying art. I was previously in an exhibition at the Castle-Fitzgerald Gallery in New York. I wrote an illustrated a children's book.


Unidentified artist. Mask: Portrait of a Bearded Man (Mblo). A141